Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


23 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 11501
Author(s): Halevi, Leor.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wailing for the Dead: The Role of Women in Early Islamic Funerals [This article concerns Muslim reactions to a woman's ritual, wailing for the dead. Halevi contrasts the approach to the ritual of eighth-century Islamic religious authorities of Medina, a city in Arabia, with those of Kufa, a garrison city in Mesopotamia. He argues that the Sunni pietists of Kufa, prompted by an acute anxiety about women mixing with men, found new ways to restrict women's sphere of action. Their restrictions differed from the prevailing traditions about women's participation in Jewish, Christian, and Zoroastrian funerals, and thus formed part of a new ideology of gender dominance. Abstract submitted to Feminae by the author.].
Source: Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 3 - 39.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 10455
Author(s): Levy, Allison.
Contributor(s):
Title : Augustine's Concessions and Other Failures: Mourning and Masculinity in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany [The author examines paintings of St. Augustine mourning his mother along with excerpts from his "Confessions," and humanist funeral orations. Levy argues that female mourning in public was suppressed in favor of controlled, masculine commemorations in Latin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 81 - 94.
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 10451
Author(s): Ingham, Patricia Clare.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Kinship to Kingship: Mourning, Gender, and Anglo-Saxon Community [The author examines the characters Wealthow and Hildeburh in "Beowulf" and, to a lesser degree, the poems, "The Wife's Lament" and "Wulf and Eadwacer." Ingham argues that the women do important cultural work as the ones responsible for hopeless loss. In the larger historical moment they uphold the ties of kinship as society comes to accept the personal loyalty owed to a centralizing sovereign. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 17 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2003.

4. Record Number: 10453
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Disordered Grief and Fashionable Afflictions in Chaucer's "Franklin's Tale" and the "Clerk's Tale" [The author examines the gendered treatment of grief. Dorigen's expressions are extremely anguished and disordered, while the male characters experience grief more "rationally" in connection with honor and the loss of power over women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 51 - 63.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 10454
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Grief in Avalon: Sir Palomydes' Psychic Pain [The author explores the failures and grief of Sir Palomydes, a Saracen, who eventually converts to Christianity, in Malory's "Morte Darthur." He is always second-best in tournaments and adventures. His friendship with Sir Tristram emphasizes the unequal competitions at the heart of chivalry. Even his lady love will not return his passion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 65 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 10452
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Death Rituals and Manhood in the Middle High German Poems "The Lament," Johannes von Tepl's "The Plowman," and Heinrich Wittenwiler's "Ring" [The author exmaines the grief exhibited by male characters in these three German texts. Title note supplied by Feminae. ]. pp 33-47
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Past and Present , 183., (May 2004):  Pages 33 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 4677
Author(s): Callahan, Leslie Abend.
Contributor(s):
Title : En Remembrance e en memoire: Grief, Memory, and Memorialization in the "Lais" of Marie de France ["My aim here is twofold: to explore how grief- the raw material of one kind of memory- is represented in the 'Lais,' and what those representations might tell us about attitudes toward death and commemoration at the time of Marie's transcription/transformation of the material of the "lais;" and then to demonstrate that in the "Lais" an object- the tomb- functions as a repository of grief and memory, and to suggest that the building of the tomb can be viewed as a metaphor for the construction of the "lai." Page 260].
Source: Romance Notes , 40., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 259 - 270.
Year of Publication: 2000.

8. Record Number: 4279
Author(s): Callahan, Leslie Abend.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Widow's Tears: The Pedagogy of Grief in Medieval France and the Image of the Grieving Widow
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 245 - 263.
Year of Publication: 1999.

9. Record Number: 5548
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mourning and Magic Words in the "Tragicomedia" [The speaker concentrates on laments in the female voice from the characters Elicia, Areúsa, and Melibea].
Source: Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 156 - 157.
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 769
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lament for a Lost Queen: The Sarcophagus of Doña Blanca in Nájera
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 78, 2 (June 1996): 311-333. Link Info Later published in Memory and the Medieval Tomb. Edited by Elizabeth Valdez del Alamo with Carol Stamatis Pendergast. Ashgate, 2000. Pages 43-79.
Year of Publication: 1996.

11. Record Number: 2541
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ploratus et Ululatus: The Mothers in the Massacre of the Innocents at Chartres Cathedral [argues that female viewers of the Frieze cared about the welfare of their children, saw the Virgin at Chartres as a protector of children, and recognized mourning as a particularly female responsibility ; also surveys twelfth-century representations of the Massacre in manuscript illuminations and sculpture].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 17., ( 1996):  Pages 95 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1996.

12. Record Number: 1374
Author(s): Barolsky, Paul and Anne Barriault
Contributor(s):
Title : Botticelli's "Primavera" and the Origins of the Elegiac in Italian Renaissance Painting [traces the theme of bittersweet loss in the paintings of Botticelli, Signorelli, Piero di Cosimo, Sebastiano del Piombo, and Titian].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 128., 1532 (septembre 1996):  Pages 63 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1996.

13. Record Number: 1673
Author(s): Callahan, Leslie Abend.
Contributor(s):
Title : Grief, Memory, and Memorialization in Four "Lais" of Marie de France ["Chaitivel," "Deus amanz," "Eliduc," and "Yonec"; International Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, May 1996].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 15
Year of Publication: 1996.

14. Record Number: 1126
Author(s): Feiss, Hugh, O.S.B.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Poet Abbess from Notre-Dame de Saintes [verses on a mortuary roll are attributed to Sibille, fifth abbess of the monastery; in the poems she celebrates the deceased, Abbess Mathilda of Holy Trinity Monastery, Caen, and reflects on the inevitability of death].
Source: Magistra , 1., 1 (Summer 1995):  Pages 39 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1995.

15. Record Number: 3415
Author(s): Bray, Dorothy Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman's Loss and Lamentation: Heledd's Song and "The Wife's Lament" [comparison of the two poems in which heroic women lament their fate bereft of male protection and support].
Source: Neophilologus , 79., ( 1995):  Pages 147 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1995.

16. Record Number: 16624
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen
Contributor(s):
Title : Mourning Rites, Memory, and Civilization in Premodern Italy [Diane Owen-Hughes argues that women's active role in mourning was a longstanding tradition of the Mediterranean and was frequently accomodated by Church officials. In late medieval Italy civic authorities acted to marginalize women's involvement by legislating their behavior, the kinds of mourning garb they could wear, and, in many cases, preventing even close female relatives from attending the funeral mass and burial. A male commemoration was given preference instead with men's funerary oratory and the new movement torward constructing elaborate tombs. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994.  Pages 23 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1994.

17. Record Number: 2725
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body and the City in "Pearl" [argues that the narrator's loss of his infant daughter is the central issue in the poem and that the visions of the maiden, the city, and the Lamb are informed by the dreamer's work of mourning and quest for consolation].
Source: Representations (Full Text via JSTOR) 48 (Fall 1994): 30-47. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

18. Record Number: 8721
Author(s): Bennett, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Mourner at Beowulf's Funeral: Filling in the Blanks / Hearing the Spaces [The article discusses the incomplete funeral passage in "Beowulf," and critiques normative editing practices around that passage, which tend to "fill it in" with a particular kind of female mourner -- the passive female victim -- rather than to accept its silences and its holes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 35 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1992.

19. Record Number: 8585
Author(s): Arden, Heather M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Grief, Widowhood, and Women's Sexuality in Medieval French Literature [The author observes that widows in medieval French literature are often represented as the most lecherous of women, and argues that the texts in effect cautioned men to keep their wives under close watch. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 305 - 319.
Year of Publication: 1992.

20. Record Number: 11070
Author(s): Huot, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Daisy and the Laurel: Myths of Desire and Creativity in the Poetry of John Froissart [Froissart’s poetic persona fuses the identities of the cleric and the lover, and thus his poetry is both learned and secular. He adapts Ovidian myths (particularly those focusing on Apollo, a figure of both poetry and wisdom) to construct a mythographic basis for his intellectualized poetic identity and love psychology. At the same time, he adapts numerous mythic allusions to transform the daisy into a symbol of erotic desire, loss, and memory. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 240-251. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

21. Record Number: 10729
Author(s): Coldstream, Nicola.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Commissioning and Design of the Eleanor Crosses [The author argues that Edward I’s extravagant mourning of Eleanor, epitomized by the commissioning of the Eleanor Crosses, intended to demonstrate the splendor of royalty. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 55 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1991.

22. Record Number: 28836
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Massacre of the Innocents
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5a/Kerald_%28Meister_des_Codex_Egberti%29_001.jpg/250px-Kerald_%28Meister_des_Codex_Egberti%29_001.jpg
Year of Publication:

23. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tomb of Don Sancho Saiz de Carillo (detail)
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8f/13th-century_unknown_painters_-_Tomb_of_Don_Sancho_Saiz_de_Carillo_%28detail%29_-_WGA23530.jpg/250px-13th-century_unknown_painters_-_Tomb_of_Don_Sancho_Saiz_de_Carillo_%28detail%29_-_WGA23530.jpg
Year of Publication: