Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


39 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 7442
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Maternal Performance of the Virgin Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 38 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2002.

2. Record Number: 8089
Author(s): Price, Merrall Llewelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imperial Violence and the Monstrous Mother: Cannibalism at the Siege of Jerusalem [The author explores the popular tale of Maria of Jerusalem who ate her own infant during a siege of Jerusalem. The author is interested in her as both a double and opposite of the Virgin Mary whose son was also sacrificed. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 272 - 298.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 7271
Author(s): McCracken, Peggy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Engendering Sacrifice: Blood, Lineage, and Infanticide in Old French Literature [The author analyzes the theme of infanticide in Chretien de Troyes' "Philomena," "Ami et Amile," accounts of Abraham and Isaac, and "Jourdain de Blaye." The author argues that the child's death takes on a different meaning according to the gender of the sacrificer. When the father kills the child, the blood is paternal blood and represents a sacrifice for loyalty or for God. When the mother kills the child, the blood is maternal, associated with the impurities of childbirth, and is done only as an act of revenge. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 55 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 11037
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monstrous (M)othering: The Representation of the Sowdanesse in Chaucer's "Man of Law Tale"
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 196 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 6926
Author(s): Rasmussen, Ann Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers to Think Back Through: The Middle High German Mother-Daughter and Father-Son Advice Poems known as "Die Winsbeckin" and "Der Winsbecke" ["In particular, the essay examines the 'enabling' notions of authenticity, authorship, and paternal authority that shaped scholarship on the poems from 1845 to 1985. The trope of a father instructing his son furnished a productive framework for the overwhelmingly male professional caste of nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars to 'think back through,' I will argue, as they constructed notions of conduct literature that privileged a version of paternal, secular authority and that rested at times on a nostalgic belief that didactic literature was imbued with an authentic connection to lived medieval experience." p. 109].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 106 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2001.

6. Record Number: 11153
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maternity and Performance: Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

7. Record Number: 5784
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Men, Women, and Miracles in Normandy, 1050- 1150 [the author argues that the representation of women in Norman miracle reports is surprisingly positive; women's testimony is recorded (when men are unavailable) and their tender care of children is emphasized; the author suggests that the monk-authors of the "miracula" were not misogynists and had contact with women, both in the monastery and in the secular world].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 53 - 71.
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 6744
Author(s): Hodgson, Natasha
Contributor(s):
Title : The Role of Kerbogha's Mother in the "Gesta Francorum" and Selected Chronicles of the First Crusade [The author argues for more scholarly attention on Kerbogha's mother, presented as an educated, loving mother who warns her warrior son of the Christians' sure victory. This character in the "Gesta Francorum" presents evidence of the author's intentions and provides an interesting study of views on women and motherhood. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Crusades.   Edited by Susan B. Edgington and Sarah Lambert .   University of Wales Press, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 163 - 176.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 7907
Author(s): Burns, E. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Raping Men: What's Motherhood Got to Do with It?
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 127 - 160.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 4467
Author(s): Menuge, Noël James.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Few Home Truths: The Medieval Mother as Guardian in Romance and Law [The author examines the roles of mothers and step-mothers in legal treatises and wardship romances; both genres favor the interests of a patrilineal, primogenitive feudal society by showing family members as untrustworthy and only the lord as reliable].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000.  Pages 77 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 4498
Author(s): Gouma-Peterson, Thalia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Power: Passages to the Maternal in Anna Komnene's "Alexiad"
Source: Full-text of the Alexiad in English (from the Medieval Sourcebook)
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 4811
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fashioning the Puritan Gentry-Woman's Devotion and Dissent in "Book to a Mother" [The author argues that the son who wrote a devotional text for his mother was a priest or friar who was angry about the corruption in the Church; he joined the worlds of devotion and religious dissent together].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 169 - 184.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4368
Author(s): Edwards, Cyril.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mothers' Boys and Mothers' Girls in the Pastourelle: Oswald von Wolkenstein, "Frölich so wil Ich aber singen" (KL.79) [The author argues that the humor of Oswald's pastourelle comes from parody, social and gender role reversals, and the lady's snobbery].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 35., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 70 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 3612
Author(s): Lionarons, Joyce Tally.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cultural Syncretism and the Construction of Gender in Cynewulf's "Elene" [The author cites instances of gender category inversions; for example, Elene acts as a mother and spiritual mother while she takes on a masculine role using physical force to make Judas convert].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (Spring 1998):  Pages 51 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 2505
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Motherhood: The Book of Margery Kempe
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 23 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1997.

16. Record Number: 2503
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maternal Reflections on Gender and Medievalism
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 17 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 2507
Author(s): Stottlemyer, Ronald.
Contributor(s):
Title : Birgitta of Sweden and the Divine Mysteries of Motherhood [discussion of her theology of motherhood that was based on her vision of Mary giving birth to the baby Jesus].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 31 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1997.

18. Record Number: 2504
Author(s): Hovland, Deborah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mothers and Fathers in the Early French Farce
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 20 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 3589
Author(s): Grundy, Stephan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Viking's Mother: Relations Between Mothers and Their Grown Sons in Icelandic Sagas
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medium Aevum , 65., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 3581
Author(s): Newton, Allyson.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Occlusion of Maternity in Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale"
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 63 - 75.
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 3579
Author(s): Quattrin, Patricia Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Milk of Christ: Herzeloydë as Spiritual Symbol in Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival"
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 25 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 1582
Author(s): Marvin, Corey J.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Will Thee Not Forsake: The Kristevan Maternal Space in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale" and John of Garland's "Stella maris"
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 35 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 2995
Author(s): Cuesta, María Luzdivina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Notes on Family Relationships in Medieval Castilian Narrative
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 197 - 224.
Year of Publication: 1996.

24. Record Number: 1169
Author(s): Tasioulas, J.A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mother's Lament: "Wulf and Eadwacer" Reconsidered [suggests that the poem concerns a mother mourning the fate of her illegitimate infant, left to die in the woods].
Source: Medium Aevum , 65., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1996.

25. Record Number: 5133
Author(s): Brumlik, Joan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thoughts on Renaut's Use of Marie's "Fresne" in "Galeran de Bretagne"
Source: Florilegium , 14., ( 1995- 1996):  Pages 87 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1995- 1996.

26. Record Number: 421
Author(s): Rowe, Elizabeth Ashman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Body Politic and the Miscarriage of Justice in "Athelston" [political critique of Richard II in which society is represented as a family].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 17., ( 1995):  Pages 79 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 6778
Author(s): Cowgill, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Missing Children ["In the lyrics, the drama, and in Chaucer's religious tales, then, the sufferings of mothers and children are made analogous to those of Mary and Christ. Children are appropriate, even essential, to this genre because, in their relationships to their mothers, they embody one of the central mysteries of the faith. Conversely, the relationships between fathers and suffering children, while presented as significant in the tales of tragedy and morality, hint at but cannot carry the same spiritual valence. Further, to recapitulate my introductory remarks, children are largely absent from the romances and fabliaux because they would be a hindrance to the internal necessities of those forms. Children are depicted in 'The Canterbury Tales' not according to any principles of realism, but according to their appropriateness to particular literary genres." p. 5 of the electronic version available through Project Muse].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 12., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 5. and 1-2 (notes) [in the electronic version available through Project Muse]. Issue title: Children and the Family in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 6782
Author(s): Schwartz, Debora B.
Contributor(s):
Title : A la guise de Gales l'atorna: Maternal Influence in Chretien's "Conte du Graal" [the author argues that Perceval's mother's influence appears throughout the text and is the chief influence in guiding her son toward selfless Christian knighthood; the value of relationships with women is also underlined by Perceval's love for Blancheflor].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 12., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 8. and 1-2 (notes) [in the electronic version available through Project Muse]. Issue title: Children and the Family in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 2309
Author(s): O'Dell, Colman, O.C.S.O.
Contributor(s):
Title : On Eagles' Wings: Symbols of Spiritual Motherhood in the Writings of the Early Cistercian Fathers
Source: Hidden Springs: Cistercian Monastic Women. Book Two. Medieval Religious Women Volume Three.   Edited by John A. Nichols and Lillian Thomas Shank, O.S.C.O Cistercian Studies Series .   Cistercian Publications, 1995. Neophilologus , 79., ( 1995):  Pages 787 - 806.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 4870
Author(s): Bejczy, Istvan and Marie-José Heijkant
Contributor(s):
Title : Il Prete Gianni el le Amazzoni: Donne in un' utopia medievale (secondo la tradizione Italiana) [classical ideas of Amazons as women inverting the proper social order were included in the "Letter of Prester John;" they were described as living on the fringes of his well-ordered realm, in which women were subordinate childbearers; Amazons were described as a threat to chastity because they saw men only for sexual contact and reproduction; the "Letter of Prester John," however, unlike classical texts, depicts the Amazons as tolerated and difficult to defeat].
Source: Neophilologus , 79., ( 1995):  Pages 439 - 449.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 341
Author(s): Coletti, Theresa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ther Be But Women: Gender Conflict and Gender Identity in the Middle English Innocents Plays [role of mothers versus the male sphere of public authority]
Source: Mediaevalia , 18., ( 1995):  Pages 245 - 261. (1995 (for 1992)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1995.

32. Record Number: 5958
Author(s): McMahon, James V.
Contributor(s):
Title : Valkyries, Midwives, Weavers, and Shape-Changers: Atli's Mother the Snake
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 66., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 475 - 487.
Year of Publication: 1994.

33. Record Number: 1588
Author(s): Dobrov, Gregory W.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Dialogue with Death: Ritual Lament and the "Threnos Theotokou" of Romanos Melodos [a "kontakion," a dramatic and complex chanted dialogue, in this case, between Mary and Christ, exploring paradoxes of gender, body, and voice].
Source: Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies , 35., 4 (Winter 1994):  Pages 385 - 405.
Year of Publication: 1994.

34. Record Number: 10293
Author(s): Leland, Blake.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mothers of the Believers in the Hadith [The article discusses the medieval Hadith on the Prophet's wives within the context of historical responses to it. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Muslim World , 82., 40180 (January-April 1992):  Pages 1 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 9481
Author(s): Harding, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Women’s Unwritten Discourse on Motherhood: A Reading of Two Fifteenth-Century Texts [The author examines two late medieval texts, those of Margery Kempe and Margaret Paston, in order to consider the relationship between masculine, public discourses on motherhood and private, feminine ones. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Studies , 21., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 197 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 13056
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tradition et renouveau dans la "Ballade pour prier Notre Dame" de Villon [The author argues that the poet entreats his mother to recite his prayer because she is a humble believer. Villon's rhetoric and acrostic signature suggest that he puts his faith in the powers of literature. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Quarterly , 38., 4 (November 1991):  Pages 387 - 397.
Year of Publication: 1991.

37. Record Number: 11819
Author(s): Cestaro, Gary P.
Contributor(s):
Title : ...quanquam Sarnum biberimus ante dentes...: The Primal Scene of Suckling in Dante's De vulgari eloquentia [In his treatise on language, Dante foregrounds suckling imagery and the importance of the maternal body. This maternal imagery stems from a long tradition of representing the allegorical figure of Grammatica (grammar) as a nurse. According to psychoanalytic theory, the assumed natural primacy of the vernacular as a mother tongue (a native language acquired before Latin) evokes a primal scene of union with the mother (a state that precedes linguistic communication in human development). Nonetheless, the rationalistic male grammarian perpetually struggles to obscure the feminine origins of speech in order to maintain strict gender boundaries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 119 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1991.

38. Record Number: 12740
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin Mary, Daughter of Her Son [The “mater et filia” topos, or the notion of the Virgin Mary as being simultaneously the mother and daughter of Christ, originated in the writings of late Antiquity but the theme also appears in the early poetry of Ireland and Britain. The first known reference to the topos in Ireland occurs in the seventh century Latin poem; an eleventh century poem written in the Irish language is perhaps the oldest vernacular example of the topos. The earliest example of the topos in Welsh poetry probably dates from around 1400. In all these instances, poets borrow and adapt ideas about the Virgin Mary from Continental sources like sermons, Church teachings, or poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Études Celtiques , 27., ( 1990):  Pages 267 - 283.
Year of Publication: 1990.

39. Record Number: 5833
Author(s): Sinclair, Finn E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Suppression, Sacrifice, Subversion: Redefining the Feminine in the "Naissance du Chevalier au Cygne" [the author argues that the three female characters (the swan-maiden, her mother, and the evil mother-in-law) were changed or diminished from their initial roles in folk stories to the twelfth-century epics in order to support the importance of the male lineage].
Source: Olifant , 20., 40182 (Fall/Summer ):  Pages 33 - 61.
Year of Publication: