Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


37 Record(s) Found in our database

SEE ALSO: ethics

Search Results

1. Record Number: 20013
Author(s): Vacca, Diane Duyos.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage and Morals in the Fourteenth Century: The Evidence of Bishop Hamo's Register [The author looks at cases from Bishop Hamo's register, 1317- 1352 in the area of Rochester. The cases concern marriage and sexual offenses, including adultery, priests' concubines, clandestine marriages (which one party often preferred to deny), and violations of betrothals. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: English Historical Review , 121., 491 (April 2006):  Pages 467 - 486.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 10878
Author(s): Naessens, Mariann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Judicial Authorities' Views of Women's Roles in Late Medieval Flanders [The author examines court records concerning various sexual crimes including adultery, brothel keeping, and cross dressing. The judges appear to be most concerned with men's honor as preserved through women's fidelity and subordination. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. English Historical Review , 121., 491 (April 2006):  Pages 51 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 10907
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Isabelle of France and Religious Devotion at the Court of Louis IX
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. English Historical Review , 121., 491 (April 2006):  Pages 209 - 223.
Year of Publication: 2003.

4. Record Number: 10649
Author(s): MacLean, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queenship, Nunneries, and Royal Widowhood in Carolingian Europe [The author traces the political implications of these three phenomena which came together very strongly during the second half of the ninth century. MacLean uses case studies of Empress Richgard's management of the monastery of Andlau in Alsace and of Empress Engelberga's administration of S. Sisto in Piacenza, Italy. In both instances the royal widows drew on natal family ties and regional connections to establish their authority. MacLean suggests that the rise in queenly influence at this period was in part an effort to establish a moral role for queens whose reputations had been badly tarnished by such events as Lothar's divorce. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Past and Present , 178., (February 2003):  Pages 3 - 38.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 10640
Author(s): Tarbin, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Moral Regulation and Civic Identity in London, 1400-1530
Source: Our Medieval Heritage: Essays in Honour of John Tillotson for His 60th Birthday.   Edited by Linda Rasmussen, Valerie Spear, and Dianne Tillotson .   Merton Priory Press, 2002. History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 126 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 8727
Author(s): Jussen, Bernhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virgins- Widows- Spouses: On the Language of Moral Distinction as Applied to Women and Men in the Middle Ages
Source: History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 13 - 32.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 5973
Author(s): McSheffrey, Shannon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Priests Behaving Badly: Clerical Sexual Misconduct in Fifteenth-Century London
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 6924
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nouvelles Choses: Social Instability and the Problem of Fashion in the "Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry," the "Ménagier de Paris," and Christine de Pizan's "Livre des Trois Vertus" [The author argues that the anti-fashion discourse in the three texts confirms that sumptuary laws and the criticisms of authorities could not control women's desires for new fashions in clothing. In fact in the descriptions and illustrations of fashions
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 49 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 4542
Author(s): Barolini, Teodolinda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dante and Francesca da Rimini: Realpolitik, Romance, Gender [The author explores the minimal historical evidence for Francesca da Polenta, wife of Gianciotto Malatesta and lover of his brother, Paolo; in contrast Dante memorializes Francesca with a striking, psychological portrait].
Source: Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 1 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2000.

10. Record Number: 4810
Author(s): Collette, Carolyn P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and the French Tradition Revisited: Philippe de Mézières and the Good Wife ["Philippe de Mézières' book on marriage and good wives shows that even before Christine de Pizan, an exact contemporary of Chaucer's dealt with the idea of marriage and the good woman in terms and stories that indicated the public nature of the marriage bond, and, within that bond, the power of women to stabilize and destabilize elements of society through virtue and through uncontrolled will." (Page 167)].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 151 - 168.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 5443
Author(s): Zarri, Gabriella
Contributor(s):
Title : Christian Good Manners: Spiritual and Monastic Rules in the Quattro- and Cinquecento [the author surveys texts on comportment and morals addressed to different groups of women (virgins, wives, widows, nuns, etc.); authors and works discussed from the fifteenth century are Giovanni di Dio da Venezia, "Decor puellarum," "Gloria mulierum," and "Palma virtutum" and Cherubino da Spoleto, "Regola di vita matrimoniale" and "Regola di vita spirituale"].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 76 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 5440
Author(s): Knox, Dilwyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Civility, Courtesy, and Women in the Italian Renaissance [The author traces the origins of the idea of "modestia," decorum and gravity, which was the standard for both women and men; "cortesia" developed in order to give men and women a way to relate to each other].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 2 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 5449
Author(s): Ajmar, Marta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exemplary Women in Renaissance Italy: Ambivalent Models of Behaviour? [the author argues that exemplary women from the classical past and from the ranks of the saints often embodied values that were more advanced than those in Italian Renaissance society; figures like Cornelia, daughter of Scipio Africanus renowned for her eloquence, were reinterpreted to emphasize her domestic and maternal strengths rather than her public skills in oratory; the author concludes, "The consideration of exemplary women actually enlarged the boundaries of the Renaissance notion of woman and generated a reappraisal of a woman's capacity for attaining virtue--but not her status or her role in society." (Page 260)].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 244 - 264.
Year of Publication: 2000.

14. Record Number: 2901
Author(s): McSheffrey, Shannon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jurors, Respectable Masculinity and Christian Morality: A Comment on Marjorie McIntosh's "Controlling Misbehavior"
Source: Journal of British Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 37, 3 (July 1998): 269-278 Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 4475
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine's Anxious Lessons: Gender, Morality, and the Social Order from the "Enseignemens" to the "Avision" [The author maintains that Christine's didactic works from 1399 to 1405 argue for the importance of female virtue].
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998.  Pages 16 - 40.
Year of Publication: 1998.

16. Record Number: 3519
Author(s): Sharp, Michael D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Remaking Medieval Heroism: Nationalism and Sexuality in "Braveheart" [The author argues that the film appeals to contemporary social values including nationalism and homophobia, by contrasting Wallace's masculinity and sexuality with the effete and homosexual English].
Source: Florilegium , 15., ( 1998):  Pages 251 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1998.

17. Record Number: 3139
Author(s): Smith, Julia M. H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Ideology in the Early Middle Ages [focuses on Carolingian noble women and their role as wives].
Source: Gender and Christian religion: papers read at the 1996 Summer Meeting and the 1997 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 34.  1998. Florilegium , 15., ( 1998):  Pages 51 - 73.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 1914
Author(s): O'Connor, Eugene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Panormita's Reply to His Critics: The "Hermaphroditus" and the Literary Defense
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 50, 4 (Winter 1997): 985-1010. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 1934
Author(s): Lansing, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Civic Authority: Sexual Control in a Medieval Italian Town
Source: Journal of Social History , 31., 1 (Fall 1997):  Pages 33 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 2318
Author(s): Puff, Helmut.
Contributor(s):
Title : Localizing Sodomy: the "Priest and Sodomite" in Pre-Reformation Germany and Switzerland [case studies of two priests accused of sodomy; conflict ensued between secular authorities who favored public, harsh punishments and Church authorities who were more lenient and wanted the cases kept secret].
Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality , 8., 2 (October 1997):  Pages 165 - 195.
Year of Publication: 1997.

21. Record Number: 4629
Author(s): Voisenet, Jacques.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mariage et Interdits sexuels au Moyen Age (Ve- XIIe siècle) [The author examines the many restrictions that the Church placed on the sexuality of married couples].
Source: Sex, Love and Marriage in Medieval Literature and Reality: Thematische Beiträge im Rahmen des 31th [sic] International Congress on Medieval Studies an der Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo-USA) 8.-12. Mai 1996.   Edited by Danielle Buschinger and Wolfgang Spiewok WODAN Bd. 69. Serie 3 Tagungsbände und Sammelschriften Actes de Colloques et Ouvrages Collectifs, 40.   Reineke-Verlag, 1996.  Pages 53 - 72.
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 5135
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Power of Feminine Anger in Marie de France's "Yonec" and "Guigemar" [The author deals with anger only briefly, considering instead Marie's approval of adultery for the malmariées, those women married to cruel husbands].
Source: Florilegium , 14., ( 1995- 1996):  Pages 123 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1995- 1996.

23. Record Number: 1990
Author(s): Hodapp, William.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Judgement of Paris and Methods of Reading in John Lydgate's "Reson and Sensuallyte"
Source: Proceedings of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 110 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1995.

24. Record Number: 16578
Author(s): Yohe, Katherine Te Pas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aelred's Guidelines for Physical Attractions [The author analyzes Aelred's text, "Speculum caritatis," and finds that physical attraction could only be tolerated under very special circumstances that led to an appreciation of the loved one's spiritual virtues; homosexual attraction is wicked and het
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 46., 40241 ( 1995):  Pages 339 - 351.
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 4684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Patrons: Nuns, Widows, and Rulers
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 46., 40241 ( 1995):  Pages 242 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 1707
Author(s): Brucker, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le monde, la foi et le savoir dans quelques oeuvres de Christine de Pizan: une quête
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 46., 40241 ( 1995):  Pages 265 - 280.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 1436
Author(s): Finnegan, Robert Emmett.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Should Have Said No to Walter: Griselda's Promise in "The Clerk's Tale" [emphasis on Griselda's moral responsibility with an analyis of the terms "assenten" and "consenten" and "tempten," "assaien," and "assaillen"].
Source: English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 303 - 321.
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 10368
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the "Epistre au dieu d’Amours" [One of the resources of feminine speech that Christine uses in her works is humor, which can be an instrument of moral critique. Christine uses the rhetorical strategies of humor, irony, and satire in her poetry to rebuke the misogyny of male authors, most powerfully in her attack of Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992.  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

29. Record Number: 10369
Author(s): McLeod, Glenda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author explores the central role of morality and ethics in Christine’s work. The “Livre” is a work of generic and allegorical sophistication. In this text, Christine adapts some of the structures and rhetorical conventions of scholasticism in order to attack literary misogyny. The author compares the literary strategies used in Christine’s work to the allegorical procedures used by scholastic thinkers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992.  Pages 37 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

30. Record Number: 10382
Author(s): Stablein-Harris, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Orleans, the Epic Tradition, and the Sacred Texts of Christine de Pizan [Christine’s experience with politics at the French court motivated her to portray the immorality of her life and times through epic texts. In her “Dit de la Rose,” she rewrites Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose” but she uses key words for her own purposes. The religious sentiment and moral tone in Christine’s “Dit” directly respond to the blasphemous and secular uses of language in Jean’s original poem. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992.  Pages 272 - 284.
Year of Publication: 1992.

31. Record Number: 10806
Author(s): Potter, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Ordo Virtutum”: Ancestor of the English Moralities? [The author argues that Hildegard's “Ordo Virtutum” was performed and connected with Church ritual, but is not a part of the later morality play tradition. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Ordo Virtutum of Hildegard of Bingen: Critical Studies.   Edited by Audrey Ekdahl Davidson .   Medieval Institute Publications, 1992. English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 31 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1992.

32. Record Number: 11109
Author(s): Hicks, Eric.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Political Significance of Christine de Pizan [The author argues that Christine's significance lies in her role as a moralist. Hicks also cautions that Christine's importance for the present age (including issues of her "feminism") must be considered carefully to avoid anachronisms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 7 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 11114
Author(s): Brown-Grant, Rosalind.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Avision Christine: Autobiographical Narrative or Mirror for the Prince? [The author argues that the autobiographical sections of "L'Avision" were intended to show Christine as an exemplar for her princely reader. She was led to a greater understanding of the self and a better relationship with God. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 95 - 111.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10756
Author(s): Allen, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blaunche on Top and Alisoun on Bottom [The author explores Chaucer's use of "descriptio" to characterize Blaunche and Alisoun. With Blaunche the physical characteristics confirm her virtuous moral qualities, while Alisoun's carnality givers her a certain autonomy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 23 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 10175
Author(s): Olsen, Glenn W.
Contributor(s):
Title : One Heart and One Soul ("Acts" 4:32 and 34) in Dhuoda's "Manual" [The author argues that Dhuoda's interpretation of "Acts" for her son is distinctly original. She sees the life of the early apostles as a model for lay spirituality and a means of ending the deadly conflict among Carolingian noble men. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Church History (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 1 (March 1992): 23-33. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 11097
Author(s): Baker, Denise N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and Moral Philosophy: The Virtuous Women of "The Canterbury Tales" [The author briefly explores the sources for the representation of the four cardinal virtues in Chaucer's tales: fortitude (Constance in the "Man of Law's Tale"), obedience (Griselda in the "Clerk's Tale"), temperance (Virginia in the "Physician's Tale"), and prudence (Prudence in the "Tale of Melibee"). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 60., 2 ( 1991):  Pages 241 - 256.
Year of Publication: 1991.

37. Record Number: 32649
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Goldsmith in His Shop
Source: Medium Aevum , 60., 2 ( 1991):
Year of Publication: