Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


49 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 10703
Author(s): Phelpstead, Carl,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sexual Ideology of Hrólfs saga kraka [The author argues that "Hrólfs saga" embodies patriachal values influenced by Christian concerns. This homosocial world of men generally views women in a misogynist light. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 2003.

2. Record Number: 8081
Author(s): Migiel, Marilyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Domestic Violence in the "Decameron" [The author examines Emilia's story about Melisso and Giosefo in the "Decameron." They both receive advice from Solomon who advocates wife beating. The story ends with the narrator Emilia offening justifications for violence against women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 164 - 179.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 6219
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing the Feminine in the Roman de Perceforest
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 6226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Por coi la pucele pleure: A Misogynistic Quest of the Holy Grail?
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 8282
Author(s): Cortijo Ocaña, Antonio.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Consells- Consejos" on Marriage and Their Broader Sentimental Context [The author examines three works of advice on marriage ("Advice of Good Doctrine which a French lady Gave Her Daughter Who Married the King of England" ("Conseyll de bones doctrines que una reyna de França dona a una filla sua que fonch muller del rey Danglaterra"), "Letter from the Marquis of Villena to His Daughter Joana" ("Letra deval scrita feu lo marques de Villena e compte de Ribagortça qui apres fo intitulat duch de Gandia, per dona Joahan filla sua quant la marida ab don Johan fill del compte de Gardona, per la qual liscrivi castich e bons nodriments, dient axi"), and "Advice from a Wiseman to His Daughters" ("Castigos y dotrinas que un sabio daba a sus hijas")) that bear structured and thematic parallels to sentimental romances. The texts emphasize women's chastity, honor, humility, and piety, but also stress a misogynous view of women's out-of-control sexuality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Sexuality in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia. Hispanic Issues, Volume 26.   Edited by Eukene Lacarra Lanz .   Routledge, 2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 39 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 8055
Author(s): Sheerin, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisters in the Literary Agon: Texts from Communities of Women on the Mortuary Roll of the Abbess Matilda of La Trinité, Caen [The author provides a brief introduction to the mortuary roll for Matilda, abbess of la Trinité monastery in Caen. Mortuary rolls announced the deaths of prominent religious women and men and provided space for monasteries and cathedrals to record prayers and commemorative poems. The author suggests that groups competed for the most elegant and rhetorically inventive entries. He also suggests that poems written by nuns may have prompted the misogynous comments in several of the entries from male religious communities. Latin texts and English translations follow of Matilda's obituary notice and the poems on the mortuary roll from women's communities. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 93 - 131.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 4807
Author(s): Lloyd-Morgan, Ceridwen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Querelle des Femmes": A Continuing Tradition in Welsh Women's Literature [the author analyzes a poem by the woman author Gwerful Mechain in which she responds to a diatribe against women by the male poet Ieuan Dyfi; Gwenful Mechain cites women fromWelsh history, the Bible and the classical tradition all who had important achievements].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 101 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2000.

8. Record Number: 4764
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Peril: Sexuality and the Subversion of Order in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 41 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2000.

9. Record Number: 3773
Author(s): Mirrer, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Representation in Male-Authored Works of the Middle Age [The author briefly discusses three subject areas in which male-authored texts need to be considered: the body, religious literature, and literature in which race and class come into play].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 315 - 330.
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 4884
Author(s): Ambrosio, Francis J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminist Self-Fashioning: Christine de Pizan and "The Treasure of the City of Ladies"
Source: European Journal of Women's Studies , 6., 1 (February 1999):  Pages 9 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1999.

11. Record Number: 4371
Author(s): Pratt, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Misogamy: The Authority of the Intertext in the "Lamentationes Matheoluli" and Its Middle French Translation [The author highlights the role that Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose " plays in LeFevre's efforts to expand and enliven the antifeminist content].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 35., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 421 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1999.

12. Record Number: 4504
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Women is Like… [the author examines three heroines in Chrétien de Troyes and Marie de France; she argues that they are compared to horses and birds in order to indicate their unreliable sexuality]
Source: Romance Quarterly , 46., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 67 - 73.
Year of Publication: 1999.

13. Record Number: 4276
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Rosaries: Virginity, Violence, and Desire in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale"
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Romance Quarterly , 46., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 181 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 3964
Author(s): Gaynor, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : He Says, She Says: Subjectivity and the Discourse of the Other in the "Prioress's Portrait" and "Tale"
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 375 - 390.
Year of Publication: 1999.

15. Record Number: 4278
Author(s): Hayward, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between the Living and the Dead: Widows as Heroines of Medieval Romances
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 221 - 243.
Year of Publication: 1999.

16. Record Number: 5549
Author(s): Beresford, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints and Sanctity in "Celestina" [The speaker argues that the character Sempronio's allusion to Bernard in his misogynist diatribe is not referring to Bernard of Clairvaux but to Bernard of Cabrera, a fifteenth-century Spanish nobleman who lost favor with the King and was publicly humiliated by his lover].
Source: Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 158 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1999.

17. Record Number: 4383
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Satirical Views of the Beguines in Northern French Literature [the author briefly analyzes the writings of Gautier de Coincy, Guillaume de St. Amour, Rutebeuf, and Jean de Meun among others; the criticisms of the beguines focus on their sexuality, desire to preach and teach, association with mendicants, and talkativeness].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 237 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1999.

18. Record Number: 4481
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Traittié tout de mençonges: The "Secrés des dames," "Trotula," and Attitudes toward Women's Medicine in Fourteenth- and Early-Fifteenth-Century France
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 146 - 178. Later reprinted in Women's Healthcare in the Medieval West: Texts and Contexts. Monica H. Green. Variorum Collected Studies Series, CS680. Ashgate Publishing, 2000, VI:146-178.
Year of Publication: 1998.

19. Record Number: 3367
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Misogyny in a Medieval University? The "Hoc contra malos" Commentary on Walter Map's "Dissuasio Valerii" [the commentator makes no attempt to develop or justify the bigotry expressed by Map against women].
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 8., ( 1998):  Pages 156 - 191.
Year of Publication: 1998.

20. Record Number: 5344
Author(s): Porter, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetorical Phallacies: The Poetics of Misogyny in Jean de Meun's Discourse of Nature
Source: Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 59 - 77. Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1998.

21. Record Number: 4477
Author(s): Case, Mary Anne C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Authority of Experience [The author argues that Christine was one of several "knowing and singular" feminists in the medieval and early modern periods who maintained that exceptional women should be considered exemplars who demonstrate the potential of all women].
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 71 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1998.

22. Record Number: 3488
Author(s): Gates, Laura Doyle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Distaff and Pen: Producing the Evangiles des Quenouilles
Source: Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 13 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1997.

23. Record Number: 2478
Author(s): Sullivan, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Inquisitorial Origins of Literary Debate [argues that Christine and her opponents, Gontier and Pierre Col and Jean de Montreuil, in the "Querrelle de la Rose" all used inquisitorial rhetoric and branded the opposite side as heretics in need of salvation].
Source: Romanic Review , 88., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 27 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1997.

24. Record Number: 1994
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ovid and the Female Voice in the "De Amore" and the "Letters" of Abelard and Heloise
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 95, 1 (August 1997): 1-26. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

25. Record Number: 2461
Author(s): Ross, Valerie A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Believing Cassandra: Intertextual Politics and the Interpretation of Dreams in "Troilus and Criseyde" [argues for a reading of Chaucer as resisting a legacy of notions about gender, authority, and agency; Chaucer makes an alliance with his female characters against misogyny].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 339 - 356.
Year of Publication: 1997.

26. Record Number: 1205
Author(s): Suranyi, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fifteenth-Century Woman's Pathway to Fame: The "Querelle de la Rose" and the Literary Career of Christine de Pizan
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 204 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1997.

27. Record Number: 2465
Author(s): Smith, Warren S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath Debates Jerome [argues that the Wife of Bath takes a centrist position on marriage and cleverly refutes the extreme misogyny of Jerome's "Adversus Jovinianum" and the classical tradition of anti-woman diatribe upon which he draws].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 129 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1997.

28. Record Number: 2464
Author(s): Warner, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman is Man's Babylon: Chaucer's "Nembrot" and the Tyranny of Enclosure in the "Nun's Priest's Tale" [gendered analysis of "wandering" (sexual, narrative, and linguistic) discusses several themes including woman as tyrant, transgressive sexuality, and the dangerous influence of Biblical translations on women].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 82 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

29. Record Number: 3647
Author(s): Nouvet, Claire.
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing (In) Fear [The author analyzes Christine's authorial personae, Cupid and Creintis(Fear); in writing her defense of women Christine must speak as a man].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 279 - 305.
Year of Publication: 1996.

30. Record Number: 2989
Author(s): Keller, Kimberly.
Contributor(s):
Title : For Better and Worse: Women and Marriage in "Piers Plowman"
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 67 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1996.

31. Record Number: 2702
Author(s): Ross, Valerie A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Resisting Chaucerian Misogyny: Reinscribing Criseyde [argues that Chaucer is a gender-conscious social visionary who seeks to subvert the "auctores" and the misogynist ideology in his transgressive alliance with Criseyde].
Source: Aestel , 4., ( 1996):  Pages 29 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

32. Record Number: 2049
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and Jean Le Fèvre [influences of Le Fèvre's "Lamentations de Matheolus" and "Livre de Leësce" on Chaucer's "Legend of Good Women," all of which share a double focus on good women and the bad men who deceive them].
Source: Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 232., ( 1995):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1995.

33. Record Number: 1720
Author(s): Brown-Grant, Rosalind.
Contributor(s):
Title : Des hommes et des femmes illustres : modalités narratives et transformations génériques chez Pétrarque, Boccace, et Christine de Pizan
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 232., ( 1995):  Pages 469 - 480.
Year of Publication: 1995.

34. Record Number: 1740
Author(s): Dishon, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Women in Medieval Hebrew Literature [emphasis on the many negative representations which the author categorizes in three sets: fearfulness and cruelty, laziness and greed or gluttony, and stupidity and shrewdness or deceitfulness].
Source: Women of the Word: Jewish Women and Jewish Writing.   Edited by Judith R. Baskin .   Wayne State University Press, 1994. Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 232., ( 1995):  Pages 35 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1994.

35. Record Number: 2606
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean le Fèvre's "Livre de Leesce": Praise or Blame of Women? [Le Fèvre wrote "Leesce" as a refutation of the text he had earlier translated, the misogynous "Lamentations of Matheolus" ; despite his varied strategies to praise women, Blumenfeld-Kosinski judges his efforts a partial failure because he gives too much consideration to the anti-female diatribes of Matheolus and falls into the trap of stereotyping women].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 69, 3 (July 1994): 705-725. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

36. Record Number: 8718
Author(s): Stebbins, Charles E.
Contributor(s):
Title : La loenge des bonnes femmes dans la version en vers du XIVe siècle consacrée à la "Vie Saint Jehan-Baptiste" [While the anonymous author's stated intention in "La loenge des bonnes femmes" is to praise good women, he clearly demonstrates some ambivalence toward women. Though he praises the good qualities of Pleisele (Aelia Flaccilla), wife of Theodosius the Grea
Source: Revue des Langues Romanes , 96., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 147 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1992.

37. Record Number: 8868
Author(s): Taylor, Steven M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Martin Le Franc's Rehabilitation of Notorious Women: The Case of Pope Joan [The author argues that Martin Le Franc worked to counter misogynous writings by speaking in defense of women like Pope Joan who had been cast as figures of wickedness. Le Franc's method, using a debate format, was to 1) emphasize her good characteristics, 2) argue that men led her into trouble, and 3) point to men who had the same weakness, but to a much greater degree. The Appendix presents the medieval French text from the "Champion des Dames," Book IV, Octaves 490-507. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 261 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1992.

38. Record Number: 10368
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the "Epistre au dieu d’Amours" [One of the resources of feminine speech that Christine uses in her works is humor, which can be an instrument of moral critique. Christine uses the rhetorical strategies of humor, irony, and satire in her poetry to rebuke the misogyny of male authors, most powerfully in her attack of Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 10369
Author(s): McLeod, Glenda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author explores the central role of morality and ethics in Christine’s work. The “Livre” is a work of generic and allegorical sophistication. In this text, Christine adapts some of the structures and rhetorical conventions of scholasticism in order to attack literary misogyny. The author compares the literary strategies used in Christine’s work to the allegorical procedures used by scholastic thinkers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 37 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

40. Record Number: 10372
Author(s): Hicks, Eric.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Mirror for Misogynists: John of Salisbury’s “Policraticus” (8.11) in the Translation of Denis Foulechat (1372) [The author presents a translation and transcription of a misogynist text written in French by Foulechat, itself a translation of a Latin text by John of Salisbury. The writings of John of Salisbury influenced Christine’s politics, as her works often seek to address misogyny in the literary tradition. The author argues that it is plausible that Christine read Foulechat’s translation of John’s work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 77 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1992.

41. Record Number: 9455
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Double Sorwe” of the Wife of Bath: Chaucer and the Misogynist Tradition [Although the Wife of Bath can be read as a strong voice of defiance against male authority, she is ultimately an ambivalent figure. She expresses both anger and sorrow in response to conflicting and contradictory male attitudes toward marriage, female sexuality, and the worth of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 179 - 205.
Year of Publication: 1992.

42. Record Number: 9487
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gawain's antifeminist rant, the pentangle and narrative space [The author considers the way Gawain’s misogynist passage fits in with the rest of the Gawain-poet’s work, as well as with alliterative poetic projects more generally. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 22., ( 1992):  Pages 117 - 139.
Year of Publication: 1992.

43. Record Number: 8320
Author(s): Pfeffer, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Louange des femmes. "Oez seignor, je n'otroi pas" (Berne, Bibliothèque de la bourgeoisie nº 354) [The author discusses a late thirteenth-early fourteenth century dit, "Oez seignor, je n'otroi pas," which praises women. Pfeffer argues that the poet combines images from courtly literature with the popular genre of the dit which was recited on street corners. The full text of the dit is included in the article. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 93., ( 1992):  Pages 221 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1992.

44. Record Number: 9545
Author(s): Favier, Dale A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anelida and Arcite: Anti-Feminist Allegory, Pro-Feminist Complaint [The author argues that a pro-feminist impulse in Chaucer’s early poem “Anelida and Arcite” conflicts with the anti-feminist (misogynist) allegorical tradition upon which it borrows. In this tradition, poetry’s betrayal of literal meaning reflects men’s betrayal of women. Anelida’s complaint against Arcite (as well as the poet’s negative portrayal of Mars and Theseus) challenge this anti-feminist literary tradition. Chaucer’s interest in female-voiced complaint carries over into much of his later work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 83 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1991.

45. Record Number: 11199
Author(s): Hagen, Susan K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath: Chaucer’s Inchoate Experiment in Feminist Hermeneutics [Although the Wife of Bath seems to represent the perspective of a real woman, she is in fact a fiction created by a male poet. Through the Wife of Bath, Chaucer tries to imagine how to represent a woman’s personal, secular experience when it does not coincide with what religious authorities claim a woman’s experience should be. In order to justify and relate her worldly experience, the Wife of Bath differentiates between religious and secular types of authority, interprets Scripture in her own way, and adopts a feminine, non-linear narrative style. In spite of these literary experiments, Chaucer ultimately fails to escape misogynist ways of thinking. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991. Chaucer Review , 26., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 105 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1991.

46. Record Number: 11078
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Misogyny and the Battle of Genders in the Stricker's "Maeren" [The author argues that the Stricker’s "maeren" work against traditional male attitudes towards women, and that, in fact, the Stricker can be seen as a defender of Women's Rights. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 92., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 105 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1991.

47. Record Number: 12789
Author(s): Tougher, Shaun
Contributor(s):
Title : The Significance of Silence [The author argues that the Roman de Silence exposes a fear of women which is disguised as misogyny, and that this misogyny draws attention to the very anxiety Heldris de Cornualle attempts to conceal. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Paragraph , 13., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 202 - 216.
Year of Publication: 1990.

48. Record Number: 11193
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Misogynistic Tradition [In her poetry, Christine de Pizan refutes the misogynist literary tradition exemplified by such texts as the Roman de la Rose. She confronts misogyny on three fronts: reason, experience, and writing. In her allegorical poems, Lady Reason encourages the author to reconsider common notions about women. The poet’s own experience allows her to give many counter examples to misogynist texts. Most importantly, Christine’s scholarly acts of reading and writing generate numerous examples of feminine virtue from books that previous writers have ignored. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Pages 297-311. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 279 - 292. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Translated by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Kevin Brownlee. W. W. Norton & Company, 1997. Pages 297-311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

49. Record Number: 11213
Author(s): Crockett, Bryan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Venus Unveiled: Lydgate’s “Temple of Glas” and the Religion of Love [Although Lydgate’s allegorical poem strikes modern readers as long-winded and boring, it is actually an interesting ironic treatment of frustrated love that achieves its effect by reworking literary influences (especially Chaucer’s dream visions). While the poem appears to be a straightforward praise of Venus and erotic love, numerous Classical references and allusions to inconstant women run throughout the work. Thus, Lydgate actually believes that trusting in erotic love (and women in general) leads to disaster. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaevalia , 14., ( 1988):  Pages 201 - 230. 1991 (for 1988)
Year of Publication: 1988.