Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


11 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 38479
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Maria Colombo Timelli, ed.
Title : Vie de sainte Katherine - MS Paris, BNF, Fr. 6449
Source: Vie de sainte Katherine. Jean Miélot.   Edited by Maria Colombo Timelli. Textes littéraires du Moyen Âge series .   Classiques Garnier, 2015.  Pages 59 - 137.
Year of Publication: 2015.

2. Record Number: 38480
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Maria Colombo Timelli, ed.
Title : Vie de sainte Katherine - MS Paris, BNF, N.A.Fr. 28650 (Copie de David Aubert)
Source: Vie de sainte Katherine. Jean Miélot.   Edited by Maria Colombo Timelli. Textes littéraires du Moyen Âge series .   Classiques Garnier, 2015.  Pages 139 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2015.

3. Record Number: 20967
Author(s): Giovini, Marco
Contributor(s):
Title : La Cucina infernale e la mirabile illusione: Il "Dulcitius" di Rosvita fra drammaturgia e innografia [Hrotsvitha used the Christian poetry of Prudentius in the composition of her plays, but she borrowed from the Roman dramatist Terence for comic relief and to lampoon enemies of the faith. In "Dulcitius," the pagan judge is humiliated by devils when he enters a kitchen while seeking to exploit captive Christian girls. Instead he embraces pots and pans, soiling his garment and making a lot of noise. This comedy was intended to reinforce the religious message of the play by humiliating the evil judge. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediaevalia , 27., 1 ( 2006):  Pages 155 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 10850
Author(s): Campbell, Emma
Contributor(s):
Title : Sacrificial Spectacle and Interpassive Vision in the Anglo-Norman Life of Saint Faith [This chapter explores what I term, after Žižek, ‘interpassive vision’ in medieval French saints’ lives. The claim that hagiographic narratives are vehicles for male voyeurism achieved some currency in feminist scholarship of the 80s; this chapter deploys the notion of interpassive vision as a means of complicating such claims, reassessing the way these critics characterise gender and sexual desire and suggesting alternative approaches to the relationship between vision and reader response in medieval texts. Summary provided by the author.]
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Mediaevalia , 27., 1 ( 2006):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 11157
Author(s): Anderson, Rachel.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Power of Speech: Gender and Direct Discourse in AElfric's "Lives of Saints"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

6. Record Number: 11158
Author(s): Lodge, Kristine Funch.
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Soul and Wholly Breast: The Implications of Objectification in AElfric's "Life of Agatha"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

7. Record Number: 2714
Author(s): Donovan, Michelle A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewriting Hagiography: The "Livre de la cité des dames"
Source: Women in French Studies , 4., ( 1996):  Pages 14 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1996.

8. Record Number: 11206
Author(s): Giannarelli, Elena.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Miracles in Christian Biography, (IVth-Vth centuries) [While miracles are a common feature in saint’s lives, the only saints who actually work miracles are male. Female saints, rather than making miracles happen, have miraculous things happen to them. Christian biographers use miraculous signs and omens exterior to woman herself in order to demonstrate the saintly status of the woman. They do not relate miraculous actions performed by the woman herself. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Patristica , 25., ( 1993):  Pages 376 - 380. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991. Biblica et Apocrypha, Orientalia, Ascetica
Year of Publication: 1993.

9. Record Number: 11421
Author(s): Laennec, Christine Moneera.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unladylike Polemics: Christine de Pizan's Strategies of Attack and Defense [The author discusses Pizan's methods of argumentation. By claiming female weakness and the persona of a virgin martyr, she put her attackers at a decided disadvantage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature (Full Text via JSTOR) 12, 1 (Spring 1993): 47-59. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1993.

10. Record Number: 10244
Author(s): Szell, Timea K.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Woe to Weal and Weal to Woe: Notes on the Structure of "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The complicated narrative structure of Margery’s “Book” reflects the author’s attempt to reconcile two contradictory psychological impulses: one is the need to gain social acceptance and legitimacy; the other is the desire to be publicly shunned and perceived as outside of societal norms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992.  Pages 73 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1992.

11. Record Number: 11215
Author(s): Winstead, Karen A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Piety, Politics, and Social Commitment in Capgrave’s "Life of St. Katherine" [Capgrave radically changes old conventions of sacred biographies by creating a new saint’s life. Interested in political, historical, and personal frameworks for martyrdom, Capgrave explores the saint’s limitations as a human and examines how her earth-bound social status affects her public involvement in the secular world. This worldly shift in the representation of the female martyr protagonist reflects the poet’s need to appeal to bourgeois women who were the primary audience for saint’s lives and pious tales. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica , 17., ( 1991):  Pages 59 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1991.