Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


1039 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 31719
Author(s): Matlock, Wendy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminine Flesh in the Disputacione betwyx the Body and Wormes
Source: The Ends of the Body: Identity and Community in Medieval Culture.   Edited by Suzanne Conklin Akbari and Jill Ross .   University of Toronto Press, 2013.  Pages 260 - 282.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 29189
Author(s): Prado-Vilar, Francisco,
Contributor(s):
Title : Iudeus sacer: Life, Law and Identity in the "State of Exception" Called "Marian Miracle"
Source: Judaism and Christian Art: Aesthetic Anxieties from the Catacombs to Colonialism.   Edited by Herbert L. Kessler and David Nirenberg .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.  Pages 115 - 142.
Year of Publication: 2011.

3. Record Number: 28447
Author(s): Simms, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bardic Poems of Consolation to Bereaved Irish Ladies
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010.  Pages 220 - 230.
Year of Publication: 2010.

4. Record Number: 11452
Author(s): Hyer, Maren Clegg.
Contributor(s):
Title : Textiles and Textile Imagery in the "Exeter Book" [The author briefly explores three kinds of textile imagery in the tenth century "Exeter Book" manuscript: textile and textile production metaphors for fate, peacemaking, and illicit sexual activity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 29 - 39.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 14697
Author(s): Harvey, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Troubadours [The author looks at evidence of Eleanor's connections to troubadours. Despite some modern historians' optimistic constructions of Eleanor and her court as a haven for troubadours, there is virtually no documentation of troubadours either in her entourage or writing songs for her. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The World of Eleanor of Aquitaine: Literature and Society in Southern France between the Eleventh and Thirteenth Centuries.   Edited by Marcus Bull and Catherine Léglu .   Boydell Press, 2005. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 101 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 14741
Author(s): Haycock, Marged.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sy abl fodd, Sibli fain: Sibyl in Medieval Wales [The author analyzes two different instances of the Sibyl figure in Welsh literature. The first examples come from two thirteenth century Welsh translations of the Latin Tiburtine oracles, "Breuddwyd Sibli" and "Proffwydoliaeth Sibli Ddoeth." The second example is drawn from a poem by the female poet Gwerful Mechain who countered Ieuan Dyfi's misogynist complaint by recounting the lives of brave women capped by the Sibyl. Haycock suggests that Gwerful may have taken the example of the Sibyl as a female forerunner to legitimize her public writing. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source:   Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 3-4., ( 2005):  Pages 115 - 130. Heroic Poets and Poetic Heroes in Celtic Tradition: A Festschrift for Patrick K. Ford. Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones. Four Courts Press, 2005
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 20399
Author(s): Lèbano, Edoardo A
Contributor(s):
Title : Amore e donne innamorate nel "Morgante" [Most of the women in Luigi Pulci's "Morgante" exist only in relationship to the male characters. Some are victims of their love for unfaithful men. In a comic inversion, these women are more constant than are the knights they love. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Italica , 82., 40241 ( 2005):  Pages 380 - 389.
Year of Publication: 2005.

8. Record Number: 20700
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing the New Middle Ages [Contemporary medieval studies attempts to escape the traps of regarding the Middle Ages as either entirely "other" or simply "modern." Nichols reviews the contributions of five recent authors: Jody Enders, Suzannah Biernoff, Jeffrey Hamburger, R. Howard Bloch, and Daniel Heller-Roazen. All have made advances by refusing to adhere to the fixed boundaries drawn by previous scholarship. Of particular interest are works by Hamburger, discussing the agency nuns attained even when cloistered, and Bloch, describing the role of Marie de France in creating vernacular literature. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 422 - 441.
Year of Publication: 2005.

9. Record Number: 14141
Author(s): Poe, Elizabeth W.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Old and the Feckless: Fabliau Husbands
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 115 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2005.

10. Record Number: 10822
Author(s): Góngora, María Eugenia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminea Forma and "Virga": Two Images of Incarnation in Hildegard of Bingen's "Symophonia"
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 10823
Author(s): Flisfisch, María Isabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Eve-Mary Dichotomy in the "Symphonia" of Hildegard of Bingen
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 37 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 10824
Author(s): Meli, Beatriz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginitas and "Auctoritas": Two Threads in the Fabric of Hildegard of Bingen's "Symphonia armonie celestium revelationum"
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 47 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2004.

13. Record Number: 10848
Author(s): Nicholson, Francesca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Women Troubadours without the "-itz" and "isms" [The author analyzes two poems attributed to women, Na Bieris de Roman and Azalais. Nicholson argues that they sometimes identify with a male lover and sometimes speak as women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 63 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2004.

14. Record Number: 10850
Author(s): Campbell, Emma
Contributor(s):
Title : Sacrificial Spectacle and Interpassive Vision in the Anglo-Norman Life of Saint Faith [This chapter explores what I term, after Žižek, ‘interpassive vision’ in medieval French saints’ lives. The claim that hagiographic narratives are vehicles for male voyeurism achieved some currency in feminist scholarship of the 80s; this chapter deploys the notion of interpassive vision as a means of complicating such claims, reassessing the way these critics characterise gender and sexual desire and suggesting alternative approaches to the relationship between vision and reader response in medieval texts. Summary provided by the author.]
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 10983
Author(s): Milfull, Inge B.
Contributor(s):
Title : War and Truce: Women in "The Wallace" [The author concentrates on the scenes of Wallace's courtship of his future wife and the diplomatic efforts of the English queen. Milfull argues that in both cases the poet regards the women as intrusive and potentially dangerous. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 3-4., ( 2005):  Pages 19 - 30.
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 10852
Author(s): Howie, Cary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vision Beyond Measure: The Threshold of Iacopone's Bedroom
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 3-4., ( 2005):  Pages 139 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2004.

17. Record Number: 11409
Author(s): Blumreich, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Ne Sey Noght is in Despyt of Women: Antifeminism in Robert de Gretham's Mirror
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 38 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 11425
Author(s): Besserman, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer, Spain, and the Prioress's Antisemitism
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 329 - 353.
Year of Publication: 2004.

19. Record Number: 10849
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Look of Love: The Gender of the Gaze in Troubadour Lyric
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 79 - 95.
Year of Publication: 2004.

20. Record Number: 11024
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale": Interrogating "Virtue" through Violence [The author argues that the tale of Griselda should not be read as an allegory of humanity's relationship to God but as Chaucer's critique of hagiography's docile, virtuous heroines. Bodden cites the Envoy as clear evidence of Chaucer's condemnation of violence and in particular the torture of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 216 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2004.

21. Record Number: 11426
Author(s): Kennedy, Ruth,
Contributor(s):
Title : Spalding's "Alliterative Katherine Hymn": A Guild Connection from the South-East Midlands?
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 455 - 482.
Year of Publication: 2004.

22. Record Number: 11408
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Question of Honor: Eufeme's Transgressions in "Le Roman De Silence" [The author argues that the lustful queen Eufeme does not understand the way honor operates for her husband, King Ebain, and for other male characters in the romance. Her plots to destroy Silence by appealing to her husband's threatened honor are too simplistic. Instead she brings her husband shame and must be executed by being torn apart by horses, the traditional death of traitors. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 28 - 37.
Year of Publication: 2004.

23. Record Number: 10984
Author(s): Harker, C. Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chrystis Kirk on the Grene and "Peblis to the Ploy": The Economy of Gender [In these two Middle Scots satires female misbehavior is defined as sexual license, whether it be peasant girls who are available to every man or the lower-class woman who thinks that she can entice a well-off merchant. Harker argues that anxieties over class distinction and the instability of the urban burghs are transferred to unruly, lower class female bodies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 31 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

24. Record Number: 14753
Author(s): Harker, C. Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Two Duchesses of Gloucester and the Rhetoric of the Feminine [The author explores the two marriages of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, third son of Henry IV. In the first he rashly made an alliance with Jacqueline, countess of Holland, which endangered England's ties with Burgundy. Defending her territories proved difficult, and he abandoned her, taking one of her ladies-in-waiting as his wife soon thereafter. Popular sympathy coalesced around the deserted countess with poems and petitions celebrating her as a good wife betrayed. Humphrey was rehabilitated to a degree by representing his second wife, Eleanor Cobham, as a seductress who snared him with sex and enchantments. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 109 - 125.
Year of Publication: 2004.

25. Record Number: 14749
Author(s): Doyle, Kara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Narratizing Marie of Ponthieu [The author analyzes three texts related to the life of Marie, countess of Ponthieu. She was heir to her father's holdings of Ponthieu but her husband's rebellion against the French king, Philippe Auguste, resulted in the forfeiture of her inheritance. Marie negotiated a settlement with Louis VIII, Philippe Auguste's successor. The three texts analyzed are: 1) the legal agreement between Marie and Lous VIII restoring her land and the inheritance rights to her children; 2) the "Roman de la Violette" by Gerbert de Montreuil in which Marie is acknowledged as patron; and the anonymous "Fille de comte de Ponthieu" in which the heroine's resemblance to Marie is less direct. Significantly all three texts downplay women's agency and do not portray the woman as holding land. Evidence suggests that Marie took direct action to regain her family's lands and privileges Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 29 - 54.
Year of Publication: 2004.

26. Record Number: 10933
Author(s): Osborn, Marijane
Contributor(s):
Title : Authorship and Sexual/Allegorical Violence in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose" [The author argues that while Jean de Meun's "Rose" calls attention to authorship and authority, it supports the privileges of patriarchy and the subordination of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 628 - 659.
Year of Publication: 2004.

27. Record Number: 12611
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Philosophy Matters: Death, Sex, Clothes, and Boethius [Lady Philosophy’s garment has an important symbolic significance, yet Boethius still depicts it as a material object. The materiality of Philosophy’s garment unsettles her supposed status as a purely immaterial abstraction. The corporeal status of her sexually-violated body and the gaps in her garment align her with the Muses of Poetry, negating a perception of Philosophy as pure, perfect, or whole. Her imperfect garment and female body thus symbolize human loss, corruption and mortality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 177 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2004.

28. Record Number: 12612
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flayed Skin as "objet a": Representation and Materiality in Guillaume de Deguileville’s "Pelerinage de vie humaine" [Allusions to flaying and stripping human flesh abound in Guillaume’s didactic allegory, which features female personifications embodying various abstractions. In the case of the Deadly Sins, flaying skin is linked to bodily punishment; in the case of Virtues, flayed skin alludes to Scripture and written documents (manuscripts being written on parchment, or flayed animal skin). Although Guillaume’s flaying theme presents skin as in some ways pointing towards a sublime immortality, the materiality of skin also represents the mortality of the body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 193 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2004.

29. Record Number: 10985
Author(s): McGinley, Kevin J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Fenzeit" and the Feminine: Robert Henryson's "Orpheus and Eurydice" and the Gendering of Poetry [The author argues that the narrative in the poem is associated with the feminine while the concluding "moralitas" is identified as masculine. McGinley suggests that in this way the poet calls into question the traditional patriarchal values and presents the feminine more positively. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 74 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2004.

30. Record Number: 11017
Author(s): Lewis, Katherine J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Edmund of East Anglia, Henry VI and Ideals of Kingly Masculinity [The author argues that Lydgate's "Life" of King Edmund was intended to instruct the young Henry VI in kingly behaviors. The Mirror for Princes tradition of advice literature as reflected in the Middle English version of the "Secretorum" also emphasized the importance of religion in a king's responsibilities, particularly with regard to sexual self-control. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Holiness and Masculinity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. H. Cullum and Katherine J. Lewis .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages Series. University of Wales Press, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 158 - 173.
Year of Publication: 2004.

31. Record Number: 10853
Author(s): Keen, Catherine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval City: Viewing the Body Politic from Exile in Early Italian Verse [Keen examines poems by four authors in exile (Dante, Cino da Pistoia, Pietro dei Faitinelli, and Niccolò del Rosso) in which the natal city is depicted as a beautiful woman; sometimes she is to be pitied, but other times she is hateful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 155 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2004.

32. Record Number: 12606
Author(s): Starkey, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Tristan” Slippers: An Image of Adultery or a Symbol of Marriage? [Leather slippers decorated with iconography apparently representing the adulterous courtly couple Tristan and Isolde were popular in the urban centers of the Low Countries, and these shoes were perhaps given as bridal gifts or in betrothal ceremonies. Although the image of an adulterous couple may not seem appropriate for shoes associated with marriage, other iconography on the slippers (such as an orchard, falcon, chessboard, and literary inscriptions) and contemporary Dutch literature about the Tristan story indicate that the urban public was reappropriating elements of courtly culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 35 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

33. Record Number: 11957
Author(s): Tolhurst, Fiona.
Contributor(s):
Title : What Ever Happened to Eleanor? Reflections of Eleanor of Aquitaine in Wace's "Roman de Brut" and Lawman's "Brut"
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 319 - 336.
Year of Publication: 2003.

34. Record Number: 10130
Author(s): Edwards, A. S. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fifteenth-Century English Collections of Female Saints' Lives [The author examines a mid-fifteenth century manuscript (Cambridge University Library MS Add. 4122) which contains two female saints' lives and a treatise on the Virgin Mary. Edwards briefly examines cultural influences (Bokenham, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Capgrave), religious practices (devotion to St. Margaret and the Virgin), and manuscript conventions (small dimensions and copying verse as prose) that contributed to books such as this one that were intended for family audiences. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 33., ( 2003):  Pages 131 - 141.
Year of Publication: 2003.

35. Record Number: 11958
Author(s): Pappano, Margaret Aziza.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France, Aliénor d'Aquitaine, and the Alien Queen
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 337 - 367.
Year of Publication: 2003.

36. Record Number: 11022
Author(s): Johnston, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender as Conduct in the Courtesy Guides for Aristocratic Boys and Girls of Amanieu de Sescás [Amanieu de Sescás wrote his poems of advice for young women and young men in the early 1290s. Johnston argues that while a few behaviors are gender specific, the poet generally emphasizes a common ethic of courtliness for nobles of both sexes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 20 (2003): 75-84. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

37. Record Number: 10451
Author(s): Ingham, Patricia Clare.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Kinship to Kingship: Mourning, Gender, and Anglo-Saxon Community [The author examines the characters Wealthow and Hildeburh in "Beowulf" and, to a lesser degree, the poems, "The Wife's Lament" and "Wulf and Eadwacer." Ingham argues that the women do important cultural work as the ones responsible for hopeless loss. In the larger historical moment they uphold the ties of kinship as society comes to accept the personal loyalty owed to a centralizing sovereign. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.  Pages 17 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2003.

38. Record Number: 9858
Author(s): Campbell, Emma
Contributor(s):
Title : Separating the Saints from the Boys: Sainthood and Masculinity in the Old French "Vie de Saint Alexis" [Based on an essay which obtained the R. H. Gapper Graduate Essay Prize in 2002 from the Society for French Studies (See www.sfs.ac.uk). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: French Studies , 57., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 447 - 462.
Year of Publication: 2003.

39. Record Number: 10453
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Disordered Grief and Fashionable Afflictions in Chaucer's "Franklin's Tale" and the "Clerk's Tale" [The author examines the gendered treatment of grief. Dorigen's expressions are extremely anguished and disordered, while the male characters experience grief more "rationally" in connection with honor and the loss of power over women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. French Studies , 57., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 51 - 63.
Year of Publication: 2003.

40. Record Number: 11956
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tempering Scandal: Eleanor of Aquitaine and Benoit de Sainte-Maure's "Roman de Troie"
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. French Studies , 57., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 301 - 317.
Year of Publication: 2003.

41. Record Number: 9857
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading across Genres: Froissart's "Joli Buisson de Jonece" and Machaut's Motets
Source: French Studies , 57., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 2003.

42. Record Number: 11953
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Reciprocal Loyalty of Eleanor of Aquitaine and William Marshal
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. French Studies , 57., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 237 - 245.
Year of Publication: 2003.

43. Record Number: 10662
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Queenship in Cynewulf's "Elene" [The author argues that Cynewulf wanted his audience to read Elene both typologically and as a figure relevant to three different historical periods: early Christian Rome, the present age of the tenth century, and a Golden Age of English conversion. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 33, 1 (Winter 2003): 47-89. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

44. Record Number: 10448
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Por coi la pucele pleure: The Feminine Enigma of the Grail Quest
Source: Neophilologus , 87., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 517 - 527.
Year of Publication: 2003.

45. Record Number: 10452
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Death Rituals and Manhood in the Middle High German Poems "The Lament," Johannes von Tepl's "The Plowman," and Heinrich Wittenwiler's "Ring" [The author exmaines the grief exhibited by male characters in these three German texts. Title note supplied by Feminae. ]. pp 33-47
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Neophilologus , 87., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 33 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2003.

46. Record Number: 11954
Author(s): McCracken, Peggy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Scandalizing Desire: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Chroniclers
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Neophilologus , 87., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 247 - 263.
Year of Publication: 2003.

47. Record Number: 10704
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage and the Creation of Kin in the Sagas [The author concludes in part: "The fact that kinship networks were up for negotiation, that each conjugal unit in a sense selected for itself when which kinship bonds were the most important, meant that power within marriage was up for negotiation too. The default obligation for men was their blood relatives and for women seems rather to have been to their husbands; but the system was flexible enough that each couple worked out for itself which relationships were most important." (page 488).]
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 473 - 490.
Year of Publication: 2003.

48. Record Number: 10447
Author(s): Klinck, Anne L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetic Markers of Gender in Medieval "Woman's Song": Was Anonymous a Woman? [The author examines five pairs of love-complaints, written wholly or in part in a woman's voice. The poems are drawn from Old English, Occitan, German, Italian, Galician-Portuguese, and Middle English. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 87., 3 (July 2003):  Pages 339 - 359.
Year of Publication: 2003.

49. Record Number: 9675
Author(s): Niles, John D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Problem of the Ending of "The Wife's Lament" [The author argues that the closing section of the "Wife's Lament" (lines 42-52a) has been misread. It is not a tender lament from a separated lover. Instead it is an angry curse directed at the husband who abandoned her. Niles suggests that modern gender assumptions prevented critics from recognizing the anger, vengeance, and other strong emotions expressed by the female speaker. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 78., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 1107 - 1150.
Year of Publication: 2003.

50. Record Number: 10450
Author(s): Besamusca, Bart.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Quest of What's on a Woman's Mind. Gauvain as Dwarf in the Middle Dutch "Wrake van Ragisel"
Source: Neophilologus , 87., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 589 - 596.
Year of Publication: 2003.

51. Record Number: 8077
Author(s): Salisbury, Eve.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Wife," the Law, and the Middle English Breton Lays [The author argues that Chaucer's Wife and the Breton lays address legal questions and loopholes concerning rape and marriage, commenting on and reinforcing the laws of both ecclesiastical and secular counts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002.  Pages 73 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2002.

52. Record Number: 8078
Author(s): Donavin, Georgiana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Taboo and Transgression in Gower's "Apollonius of Tyre" [The author examines the themes of violence and incest in the story of Apollonius and Antiochus. The author argues that prohibitions against these crimes serve in part to evoke them. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002.  Pages 94 - 121.
Year of Publication: 2002.

53. Record Number: 7835
Author(s): Gilmore, Gloria Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's "Bisclavret": What the Werewolf Will and Will Not Wear ["This chapter will attempt to unravel that tangled tension in the story of 'Bisclavret,' where there are two opposing functions of clothing: to confine in a social role or identity imposed from without , or to express a self-definition, chosen or generated from within." Page 67.].
Source: Encountering Medieval Textiles and Dress: Objects, Texts, Images.   Edited by Désirée G. Koslin and Janet E. Snyder .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.  Pages 67 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2002.

54. Record Number: 9179
Author(s): Holsinger, Bruce and David Townsend
Contributor(s):
Title : Ovidian Homoerotics in Twelfth-century Paris: The Letters of Leoninus, Poet and Polyphone [The authors analyze two Latin poems by Leoninus, a cathedral canon in Paris. Leoninus uses echoes from Ovid not only to establish a playful, loving exchange with his male addressees but, according to Holsinger and Townsend, to celebrate male-male sexual consummation as "a noble and ennobling pursuit." The Appendix presents the Latin texts of the two poems from Bibliothèque nationale MS Latin 14759 ("On a Ring Given by Cardinal Henry" and "To a Friend Who Will Come for the Festival of the Staff") along with English translations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 8, 3 (2002): 389-423. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

55. Record Number: 8059
Author(s): Griffiths, Fiona.
Contributor(s):
Title : Herrad of Hohenbourg and the Poetry of the "Hortus deliciarum: Cantat tibi cantica" [The author provides a brief overview of Herrad's encyclopedic "Hortus." She suggests that in addition to the dedicatory poem for the women of Hohenberg, Herrad probably also wrote "De primo homine" and "Rithmus de Domino" which share her same tone of joyful love for Christ. Latin texts and English translations of selected poems from the "Hortus deliciarum follow." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 231 - 263.
Year of Publication: 2002.

56. Record Number: 10531
Author(s): Colwell, Tania.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Masculinities: Transgressions and Transformations
Source: Our Medieval Heritage: Essays in Honour of John Tillotson for His 60th Birthday.   Edited by Linda Rasmussen, Valerie Spear, and Dianne Tillotson .   Merton Priory Press, 2002.  Pages 137 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2002.

57. Record Number: 6402
Author(s): Curtis, Liane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and "Dueil Angoisseux" [When Christine de Pizan began her literary carrier, writing the "Cent Ballades," she exploited her widow's status, writing in terms of lamentation and long suffering; these were supposed to come naturally to women, especially to widows, removed by misfortune from contamination though sexual activity; "Dueil Angoisseux" was one of these ballades; the poem, an expressions of a widow's grief, was set to music by Binchois (Gilles); both Christine's text and Binchois' music exploit effectively a topic, suffering, in which women were believed to be superior to men; the Appendix presents the French text of "Dueil Angoisseux" along with an English translation].
Source: Gender, Sexuality, and Early Music.   Edited by Todd M. Borgerding .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 265 - 282.
Year of Publication: 2002.

58. Record Number: 6224
Author(s): Nicholson, Francesca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Women Troubadours without the "-itz" and "-isms"
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

59. Record Number: 7397
Author(s): Jordan, Constance.
Contributor(s):
Title : More from "The Other Voice" in Early Modern Europe [The author writes a review essay concerning seven recent titles in the University of Chicago Press Series "The Other Voice." Three of the titles are by medieval authors: Sister Bartolomea Riccoboni, "Life and Death in a Venetian Convent;" Lucrezia Tornabuoni de' Medici, "Sacred Narratives;" and Cassandra Fedele, "Letters and Orations." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 55., 1 (Spring 2002):  Pages 258 - 271.
Year of Publication: 2002.

60. Record Number: 8435
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pilate's Visionary Wife and the Innocence of Eve: An Old Saxon Source for the Old English "Genesis B" [The author argues that the "Genesis B" poet tells the story of the Fall according to Germanic literary tradition. Because Eve needs to be innocent, the poet adapted an episode from the "Heliand" concerning Pilate's wife's vision. Thus Eve ensares her husband thinking that she is being given special visions of God. Title note from Feminae.].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 101., 2 (April 2002):  Pages 170 - 184.
Year of Publication: 2002.

61. Record Number: 7305
Author(s): Rasmussen, Ann Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Knowledge and Eavesdropping in the Late-Medieval "Minnerede" [The author argues for a poetics of gender in the "Minnerede" with an eavesdropping male narrator and a female speaker whose concerns about love are voiced in secret. The "Minnereden" narratives take place in two different milieu, the city and the court. The appendix inventories twenty-five "Minnereden" and seven "maeren" that feature an eavesdropping motif. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 77., 4 (October 2002):  Pages 1168 - 1194.
Year of Publication: 2002.

62. Record Number: 9508
Author(s): Powell, Morgan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Scripture for "Ma Dame de Champagne": The Old French "Paraphrase" of Psalm 44 ("Eructavit") [The author analyzes the Old French translation of Psalm Forty-Four made for Marie de Champagne. The poet sets his wedding song for Christ and his bride, Holy Church, within the context of the secular court which is seen as the equivalent of heaven. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 77., 4 (October 2002):  Pages 83 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2002.

63. Record Number: 6212
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The look of love: the gender of the gaze in troubadour lyric
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Speculum , 77., 4 (October 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

64. Record Number: 7442
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Maternal Performance of the Virgin Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 38 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2002.

65. Record Number: 8086
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Homicidal Women" Stories in the "Roman de Thèbes," the "Brut Chronicles," and Deschamps's "Ballade 285" [The author summarizes her thesis in this way: "These three phenomena concerning the homicidal-women stories--their participation in the narrow yet strong narrative tradition of women-on-top, their framing in the inaccessible sphere of myth, and their use as a currency of literary prestige--were all coherent with the dominant male ideology and, perhaps more unexpectedly, useful in shaping national politics." (Pages 207-208)].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 205 - 222.
Year of Publication: 2002.

66. Record Number: 7293
Author(s): McCash, June Hall.
Contributor(s):
Title : La vie seinte Audree: A Fourth Text by Marie de France? [The author suggests that the saint's life was written by Marie de France. She argues that vocabulary, style, and literary technique are all very similar to Marie de France's texts. She also argues that the theme of spiritual marriage in the saint's life would be congenial to the author of "Eliduc." Moreover, the author names herself Marie and asks to be remembered as does Marie de France. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 77., 3 (July 2002):  Pages 744 - 777.
Year of Publication: 2002.

67. Record Number: 9334
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender in the World of William Marshal and Bertran de Born [The author analyzes the lives of both William Marshal, knight "extraordinaire," and Bertran de Born, a French lord and troubadour, arguing for a continuity in their culture of a secular, knightly world made up largely of men. However, from Bertran's poem
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 44-60. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

68. Record Number: 7848
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Hoccleve, the Virgin, and the Politics of Complaint
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 117., 5 (October 2002):  Pages 1172 - 1187.
Year of Publication: 2002.

69. Record Number: 6203
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Heroes and Ladies in Medieval Romance and Contemporary Mainstream Cinema
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 117., 5 (October 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

70. Record Number: 6226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Por coi la pucele pleure: A Misogynistic Quest of the Holy Grail?
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 117., 5 (October 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

71. Record Number: 6218
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Now you see it, now you don't: Inside Jacopone's bedroom
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 117., 5 (October 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

72. Record Number: 8080
Author(s): Drake, Graham N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Not Safe Even in Their Own Castles: Reading Domestic Violence Against Children in Four Middle English Romances [The author argues that the physical abuse, danger in homes, abusive foster guardians, and forced marriages experienced by the children in these romances served to evoke pathos. Readers among the gentry and urban middle class were anxious about violence and insecurity but in these romances the children usually triumphed over extreme difficulties with a happy ending. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 117., 5 (October 2002):  Pages 139 - 163.
Year of Publication: 2002.

73. Record Number: 10833
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hadewijch als erotische Liebesdichterin
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 23 - 42.
Year of Publication: 2002.

74. Record Number: 8495
Author(s): Wilcockson, Colin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Woodbind and the Nightingale Images in "Troilus and Criseyde" Book II, Lines 918-924 and Book III, Lines 1230-1239 [The author argues that Chaucer draws the imagery from two lais by Marie de France. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 3 (September 2002):  Pages 320 - 323.
Year of Publication: 2002.

75. Record Number: 6199
Author(s): Arden, Heather.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Who Love Too Much: Christine de Pizan's Deconstruction of Courtly Love
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Notes and Queries , 3 (September 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

76. Record Number: 6200
Author(s): Batt, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Patronage and the Metatextual in Thomas Hoccleve's Series
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Notes and Queries , 3 (September 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

77. Record Number: 6220
Author(s): Keen, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the city: desire, distance, and politco-erotic manoeuvres in early Italian verse
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Notes and Queries , 3 (September 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

78. Record Number: 7271
Author(s): McCracken, Peggy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Engendering Sacrifice: Blood, Lineage, and Infanticide in Old French Literature [The author analyzes the theme of infanticide in Chretien de Troyes' "Philomena," "Ami et Amile," accounts of Abraham and Isaac, and "Jourdain de Blaye." The author argues that the child's death takes on a different meaning according to the gender of the sacrificer. When the father kills the child, the blood is paternal blood and represents a sacrifice for loyalty or for God. When the mother kills the child, the blood is maternal, associated with the impurities of childbirth, and is done only as an act of revenge. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 55 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2002.

79. Record Number: 10458
Author(s): Sanok, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing Feminine Sanctity in Later Medieval England: Parish Guilds, Saints' Plays, and the "Second Nun's Tale" [The author signals the "oppositional potential" of plays, pageants, and Chaucer's dramatic recounting of the lives of female martyrs. Seeing women, who are normally excluded from authority, portrayed as preaching and teaching (without any suggestion of heterodoxy) must have made civic and ecclesiastical officials nervous. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 269-303. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

80. Record Number: 6231
Author(s): Sturges, Robert S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sodomy and Sense: Bodily (In)Visibility in the Gast of Gy
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

81. Record Number: 8055
Author(s): Sheerin, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisters in the Literary Agon: Texts from Communities of Women on the Mortuary Roll of the Abbess Matilda of La Trinité, Caen [The author provides a brief introduction to the mortuary roll for Matilda, abbess of la Trinité monastery in Caen. Mortuary rolls announced the deaths of prominent religious women and men and provided space for monasteries and cathedrals to record prayers and commemorative poems. The author suggests that groups competed for the most elegant and rhetorically inventive entries. He also suggests that poems written by nuns may have prompted the misogynous comments in several of the entries from male religious communities. Latin texts and English translations follow of Matilda's obituary notice and the poems on the mortuary roll from women's communities. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 93 - 131.
Year of Publication: 2002.

82. Record Number: 9337
Author(s): Udry, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Robert de Blois and Geoffroy de la Tour Landry on Feminine Beauty: Two Late Medieval French Conduct Books for Women [The author argues that Robert de Blois and the Chevalier de la Tour Landry conceive of feminine beauty in very different ways. For Robert his chief concern is women's sociability and the ways to promote social interactions between members of varied classes. On the other hand the Chevalier is concerned that his daughters make good marriages and carry on his lineage. He warns his daughters that artificial beauty in the form of fashion and cosmetics only distorts the beauty that comes from God. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 90-102. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

83. Record Number: 9335
Author(s): Hafner, Susanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Coward, Traitor, Landless Trojan: Æneas and the Politics of Sodomy [The author argues that the complaints against Æneas, as presented by the queen to her daughter Lavinia, center on the political rather than the sexual aspects of his preferences for men. Furthermore since Æneas abandoned Dido and refused to even leave her pregnant with his baby, the queen worries that her daughter will not have a child and the kingdom no future ruler. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 61-69. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

84. Record Number: 11031
Author(s): Watt, Diane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Consuming Passions in Book VIII of John Gower's "Confessio Amantis" [The author argues that the various "appetites" condemned by Gower (incest, latent homosexuality, and female desire) are part of a mirror for princes guide to proper manly behavior that emphasizes the control of sexuality. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002.  Pages 28 - 41.
Year of Publication: 2002.

85. Record Number: 11037
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monstrous (M)othering: The Representation of the Sowdanesse in Chaucer's "Man of Law Tale"
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002.  Pages 196 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2002.

86. Record Number: 8079
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reframing the Violence of the Father: Reverse Oedipal Fantasies in Chaucer's Clerk's, Man of Law's, and Prioress's Tales [The author argues that the family relations both in the tales of Griselda and of Custance manifest a profound anxiety about paternity and a need for concealed violence, both physical and psychic. The happy endings do not mask the father's violence and the conflict between the generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002.  Pages 122 - 138.
Year of Publication: 2002.

87. Record Number: 11154
Author(s): Smith, Scott T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wifes Willan: The Disruptive Female Subject in Cynewulf's "Juliana"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

88. Record Number: 6043
Author(s): Patterson, Lee.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Pardoner on the Couch: Psyche and Clio in Medieval Literary Studies [the author argues that psycholanalytic theory has been abandoned by psychology and medicine while at the same time medieval literary historians have adopted it with great enthusiasm; the author takes the "Pardoner's Prologue" and "Tale" as a case study and suggests that the castration and homosexuality frequently seen as the key elements in the Pardoner's character were intended by Chaucer to be read metaphorically as indications of the Pardoner's barrenness and false religious beliefs].
Source: Speculum , 76., 3 (July 2001):  Pages 638 - 680.
Year of Publication: 2001.

89. Record Number: 9180
Author(s): Holmes, Olivia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dante's Two Beloveds: Ethics as Erotic Choice [The author explores the pattern of two competing but almost identical female archetypes as love objects in Dante's writings (particularly in the "Convivio" and the "Commedia"). In certain respects the women are rivals and represent the sacred versus the profane. In some cases they can also be read as stages in ethical development with the first female as precursor and the second as fulfillment. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 19., ( 2001):  Pages 25 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2001.

90. Record Number: 6350
Author(s): Pearsall, Derek.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor Prescott Hammond [Hammond had a rigorous university education but held no teaching positions; nevertheless she compiled two volumes that are still of use today, "Chaucer: A Bibliographic Manual" (1908) and "English Verse: Between Chaucer and Surrey" (1927)].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 31., (Spring 2001):  Pages 29 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2001.

91. Record Number: 6743
Author(s): Edgington, Susan B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sont çou ore les fems que jo voi la venir? Women in the "Chanson d'Antioche" [The poet adapted already existing verse to create a three-part cycle about the First Crusade. The author argues that the poet introduces women generally as an element of humor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Crusades.   Edited by Susan B. Edgington and Sarah Lambert .   University of Wales Press, 2001. Medieval Feminist Forum , 31., (Spring 2001):  Pages 154 - 162.
Year of Publication: 2001.

92. Record Number: 7908
Author(s): Jones, Nancy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Daughter's Text and the Thread of Lineage in the Old French "Philomena"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Medieval Feminist Forum , 31., (Spring 2001):  Pages 161 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2001.

93. Record Number: 9051
Author(s): Marvin, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Albine and Isabelle: Regicidal Queens and the Historical Imagination of the Anglo-Norman Prose "Brut" Chronicles [The author argues that the prose continuators of the "Brut," particularly the author of the "Long Continuation," draw connections between Albine, the rebellious daughter of a noble king who kills her royal husband and is exiled to a distant isle that she names Albion, and Queen Isabella of France, who plotted with Roger Mortimer to kill her husband, King Edward II, and usurp his power. The Appendix presents an edition of the prose prologue to the "Long Version" of the Anglo-Norman prose "Brut" with a facing page English translation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Arthurian Literature , 18., ( 2001):  Pages 143 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2001.

94. Record Number: 7909
Author(s): Bott, Robin L.
Contributor(s):
Title : O, Keep Me from Their Worse Than Killing Lust: Ideologies of Rape and Mutilation in Chaucer's "Physician's Tale" and Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 189 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2001.

95. Record Number: 5603
Author(s): Pike, David L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le dreit enfer vus mosterruns: Marie de France's "Espurgatoire Seint Patriz"
Source: Viator , 32., ( 2001):  Pages 43 - 57.
Year of Publication: 2001.

96. Record Number: 10055
Author(s): Burgess, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cynewulf's "Juliana" and the Art of Eloquence
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

97. Record Number: 10645
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Broken Bodies and Singing Tongues: Gender and Voice in the Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 23 "Psychomachia" [The author argues that the Anglo-Saxon reader of the "Psychomachia" and the "Passio Sancti Romani" (also by Prudentius) was encouraged through text and illustrations to see the self as masculine and the body as feminine. Karkov notes that the Anglo-Saxon "Psychomachia" manuscripts were the first to depict the Virtues and Vices as primarily female, rather than the earlier practice of Virtues as male warriors and the Vices as monsters. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 30., ( 2001):  Pages 115 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2001.

98. Record Number: 11162
Author(s): Klein, Stacy S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reforming Queenship: Gender and Nostalgia in Late Anglo-Saxon Literature
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference Paper presented at the Tenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, University of Helsinki, August 6-11, 2001, "Anglo-Saxons and the North
Year of Publication: 2001.

99. Record Number: 13635
Author(s): Campbell, Kimberlee A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Behavior and Social Consequences in the Old French "Chanson de geste" [The author argues that sexuality in French epics is generally subordinated to concerns of lineage and social order. Young women sometimes express sexual desire and even take the initiative, but it is up to the male characters to determine what will happen. Frequently the hero demonstrates sexual restraint and is rewarded later with marriage to the young girl who turns out to be a king's daughter. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 199 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2001.

100. Record Number: 13636
Author(s): Denis, Françoise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Primauté d'une politique territoriale dans certains marriages épiques. "Raoul de Cambrai": un cas exemplaire? [The author analyzes the marriages arranged for territorial gain by the king in the epic "Raoul de Cambrai." The king wants to bind the territories in northeast France, including Artois and Ponthieu, to him by installing loyal new men as the husbands of heiresses and widowed noble women. The text is critical of the king's all powerful, ruthless approach. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 213 - 227.
Year of Publication: 2001.

101. Record Number: 13637
Author(s): Foehr- Janssens, Yasmina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Une Reine au désert: désolation et majesté dans "Berte as grans piés" d' Adenet le Roi [The author analyzes Adenet le Roi's presentation of the persecuted queen Berthe which draws on earlier chanson de geste scenes of suffering male heroes including Roland. While Berthe is betrayed, she displays the hallmarks of a holy woman including patience, mercy, chastity, and resolution. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 229 - 245.
Year of Publication: 2001.

102. Record Number: 13638
Author(s): Ion, Despina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Politique matrimoniale et stratégies narratives dans "Garin le Loheren" [The author explores the marriage exchanges made by the king, Pippin, which sometimes favor the noble men from Lorraine and sometimes instead help their rivals, the nobles from Bordeaux. There is a great deal of maneuvering with the group from Bordeaux declaring matches invalid. Marriage is generally with a higher ranked woman which confers status and resources on the new husband. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 247 - 265.
Year of Publication: 2001.

103. Record Number: 13639
Author(s): Roussel, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : Réécritures de "Florence de Rome" au XIVe siècle [The author looks at fourteenth century adaptations of the "Florence de Rome" poem, in particular an anonymous version written in epic style. The story of Florence concerns a chaste queen denounced by her brother-in-law (whose advances she rejected), disbelieved by her husband, and forced to wander until she founds a hospital and is declared innocent by her accusers. In comparing the earlier version with the fourteenth century epic account, Roussel notes less reliance on detailed descriptions but more emphasis on awakening the audience's pity for Florence's suffering. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 815 - 826.
Year of Publication: 2001.

104. Record Number: 6676
Author(s): Seaman, Myra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Engendering Genre in Middle English Romance: Performing the Feminine in "Sir Beves of Hamtoun" [the author argues that Josian, the heroine, does not behave according to French romance expectations; she uses the assumptions of other characters concerning standard feminine weaknesses in order to take action and save herself; the narrator rewards Josian for her bold actions and, in a role reversal, devotes portions of the poem to her adventures when she and the hero are separated].
Source: Studies in Philology , 98., 1 (Winter 2001):  Pages 49 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2001.

105. Record Number: 7906
Author(s): Potkay, Monica Brzezinski.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Violence of Courtly Exegesis in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Studies in Philology , 98., 1 (Winter 2001):  Pages 97 - 124.
Year of Publication: 2001.

106. Record Number: 11152
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Haliurunnas, Helrunan, and the History of Grendel's Mother
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

107. Record Number: 6926
Author(s): Rasmussen, Ann Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers to Think Back Through: The Middle High German Mother-Daughter and Father-Son Advice Poems known as "Die Winsbeckin" and "Der Winsbecke" ["In particular, the essay examines the 'enabling' notions of authenticity, authorship, and paternal authority that shaped scholarship on the poems from 1845 to 1985. The trope of a father instructing his son furnished a productive framework for the overwhelmingly male professional caste of nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars to 'think back through,' I will argue, as they constructed notions of conduct literature that privileged a version of paternal, secular authority and that rested at times on a nostalgic belief that didactic literature was imbued with an authentic connection to lived medieval experience." p. 109].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 106 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2001.

108. Record Number: 11155
Author(s): Gerli, E. Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nowell Codex: From "Judith" to "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

109. Record Number: 35427
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth
Contributor(s):
Title : Public Bodies and Psychic Domains: Rape, Consent, and Female Subjectivity in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Troilus and Criseyde"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose The New Middle Ages Series. .   Palgrave, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 281 - 310.
Year of Publication: 2001.

110. Record Number: 11153
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maternity and Performance: Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

111. Record Number: 6079
Author(s): Taylor, Steven M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan's Spiritual Intercessions for Her Sisters in Christ [The author briefly surveys Christine's writings that incorporate prayers on behalf of women; he points out the importance of patience and the intercessory role of the Virgin Mary in these prayers].
Source: Magistra , 7., 1 (Summer 2001):  Pages 52 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2001.

112. Record Number: 7903
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Chaucer Reading Rape
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Magistra , 7., 1 (Summer 2001):  Pages 21 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2001.

113. Record Number: 6974
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Le cadavre adoré: Sappho à Byzance? [The author argues that, although Sappho was admired by Byzantine writers, she was quoted very sparingly. This was because her complete texts were no longer available; only grammatical texts and rhetoric handbooks preserved short excerpts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantion , 71., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 233 - 250.
Year of Publication: 2001.

114. Record Number: 5974
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mon al hym one: Conflicting Modes of Association and Violence in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Byzantion , 71., 1 ( 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

115. Record Number: 20897
Author(s): Brusegan, Rosanna
Contributor(s):
Title : Yseut e Richeut [Beroul and other writers about Tristan and Isolde knew the tales of Richeut, a courtesan who evolved into a devoted mother. Isolde is compared to Richeut when she shows her conniving and sensual side. Differences remained, including the causal role of magic in Isolde's relationship with Tristan compared to Richeut's use of magic merely to accomplish her ends. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medioevo Romanzo , 25., ( 2001):  Pages 284 - 300.
Year of Publication: 2001.

116. Record Number: 6282
Author(s): Pearcy, Roy J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fabliau and Romance: Three Notes [The author argues that fabliaux and romances were intended for the same aristocratic audience; the author cites examples from three fabliaux that suggest a courtly cultural milieu].
Source: Romance Notes , 41., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 267 - 272.
Year of Publication: 2001.

117. Record Number: 8667
Author(s): Samplonius, Kees.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sibylla borealis: Notes on the Structure of "Voluspá" [The author explores the figure of the "volva" in "Voluspá," an eddic poem. She is a seer who does magic and is modelled in part on the sibyl of antiquity, although there is some evidence for her earlier historical existence. The author argues that the volva's mixture of pagan and Christian elements is done deliberately to provide different levels of meaning for varied audiences. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Germanic Texts and Latin Models: Medieval Reconstructions.   Edited by K. E. Olsen, A. Harbus, and T. Hofstra .   Based on papers presented at an international conference held July 1-3, 1998 at the University of Groningen. Peeters, 2001. Romance Notes , 41., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 185 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2001.

118. Record Number: 5978
Author(s): Price, Paul.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Case of Gender Conflict Avoided? The Magnanimous Cuckold in the "Tale of Sir Corneus"
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Romance Notes , 41., 3 (Spring 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

119. Record Number: 7201
Author(s): Léglu, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Women Perform Satirical Poetry? "Trobairitz" and "Soldadeiras" in Medieval Occitan Poetry [The author argues that women performed some satirical and political poems before audiences. Modern scholars have been slow to recognize women's roles as performers, particularly in the case of these poems that do not concern love, the topic deemed by scholars to be most suitable for women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 37., 1 (January 2001):  Pages 15 - 25.
Year of Publication: 2001.

120. Record Number: 6436
Author(s): Burrell, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tel seit la lei de mariage: Fact and Fiction in Models of Twelfth-Century Marriage [the author examines the depiction of marriage in two French texts, the "Mystère d'Adam" and "Erec et Enide," which explore both the theories of marriage and its practice; for Adam and Eve, marriage fails because of a lack of loyalty, but for Chrétien's couple mutual trust and devotion are rewarded].
Source: Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, New Series , 18., 2 (January 2001):  Pages 1 - 15.
Year of Publication: 2001.

121. Record Number: 7912
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Public Bodies and Psychic Domains: Rape, Consent, and Female Subjectivity in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Troilus and Criseyde"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, New Series , 18., 2 (January 2001):  Pages 281 - 310.
Year of Publication: 2001.

122. Record Number: 16594
Author(s): Hennequin, M. Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Judith Warrior Princess?
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

123. Record Number: 8666
Author(s): Olsen, Karin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cynewulf's Elene: From Empress to Saint [The author explores some of the themes in Cynewulf's poem about Saint Helen. These include the literary portrayal of women with power, the figure of the pious and chaste female leader who needs to follow a male commander, parallels with real-life female rulers like Aethelflaed, and Elene's emotional problems including her irrationality and difficulties controlling her temper. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Germanic Texts and Latin Models: Medieval Reconstructions.   Edited by K. E. Olsen, A. Harbus, and T. Hofstra .   Based on papers presented at an international conference held July 1-3, 1998 at the University of Groningen. Peeters, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 141 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2001.

124. Record Number: 5981
Author(s): Weckström, Mari Pakkala.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Rise and Fall of the Faithful Wife: Chaucer's Griselda and Dorigen Seen Through Dialogue
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

125. Record Number: 6437
Author(s): Dell, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Voices, "Realities," and Narrative Style in the Anonymous "chansons de toile" [The author examines 16 anonymous "chansons de toile" (particularly the nine in the "Chansonnier Français de Saint-Germain-des-Prés") and argues that the male narrating voice allows the female character and her song to be fully realized].
Source: Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, New Series , 18., 2 (January 2001):  Pages 17 - 33.
Year of Publication: 2001.

126. Record Number: 6927
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Theories of Education in Fifteenth-Century Conduct Books [The author compares texts written for boys and girls and argues that medieval ideas about gender affected both content and teaching methods. Boys learned visually, could handle abstract ideas, and did not need examples of violence to ensure obedience, while girls learned by listening, could only understand the concrete, and had to be threatened with corporal punishment regularly to preserve their sexual purity and by extension the family's honor. The texts the author analyzes are: For girls: "The Good Wife Taught Her Daughter" "The Good Wyfe Wold a Pylgremage" "The Book of the Knight of the Tower" For boys: "The Babees Book" "Lerne or Be Lewde" "The ABC of Aristotle" "Urbanitatis" "The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil Boke" "The Young Children's Book" "Stans puer ad mensam" "How the Wise Man Taught His Son" "The Boke of Curtasye" "Symon's Lesson of Wysedome for All Maner Chyldryn." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, New Series , 18., 2 (January 2001):  Pages 135 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2001.

127. Record Number: 6281
Author(s): Ramey, Lynn Tarte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Role Models? Saracen Women in Medieval French Epic [The author suggests various ways that French women listening to chansons de geste might have reacted to the characters of Saracen women who took independent actions].
Source: Romance Notes , 41., 2 (Winter 2001):  Pages 131 - 141.
Year of Publication: 2001.

128. Record Number: 11163
Author(s): Klinck, Anne L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Freyja or Aphrodite? The Wife's Lament North and South
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference Paper presented at the Tenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, University of Helsinki, August 6-11, 2001, "Anglo-Saxons and the North
Year of Publication: 2001.

129. Record Number: 5605
Author(s): Mann, Jill.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wife-Swapping in Medieval Literature [in order to understand better the relationships among Dorigen, Arveragus, and Aurelius, the author considers the exchange of wives between friends in a number of earlier medieval texts, including the Latin poem "Lantfrid and Cobbo," the many versions of "Amis and Amiloun," the thirteenth-century romance "Athis and Prophilias," Boccaccio's story in the "Decameron" concerning Titus and Gisippus, the story of Rollo and Resus in Walter Map's "De Nugis Curialium," and Giovanni Fiorentino's story of Stricca and Galgano in his fourteenth-century collection "Il Pecorone"].
Source: Viator , 32., ( 2001):  Pages 93 - 112.
Year of Publication: 2001.

130. Record Number: 10183
Author(s): Psaki, F. Regina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Voices and Medieval Song: An Interview with Anne Azéma and Shira Kammen [Azéma and Kammen performed medieval music for the "Medieval and Renaissance Lyric" course at the University of Oregon. Afterwards the students and teacher (F. Regina Psaki) asked the two musicians about their performance practice, troubadour verse and music, and the various kinds of evidence that informed their repertoire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 32., (Fall 2001):  Pages 14 - 23.
Year of Publication: 2001.

131. Record Number: 10185
Author(s): Langdon, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pois dompna s'ave/d'amar: Na Castellosa's "Cansos" and Medieval Feminist Scholarship [The author explores feudal metaphors in the poetry of the trobairitz Castelloza. Langdon argues that it is important to historicize Castelloza's speakers who have, in many respects, taken up the supplicant position of the troubadours. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 32., (Fall 2001):  Pages 32 - 42.
Year of Publication: 2001.

132. Record Number: 5719
Author(s): Kirkham, Victoria.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetic Ideals of Love and Beauty [The author examines the themes of love and beauty in the writings of Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Poliziano, and Lorenzo de'Medici].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001. Medieval Feminist Forum , 32., (Fall 2001):  Pages 48 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2001.

133. Record Number: 6095
Author(s): Straubhaar, Sandra Ballif
Contributor(s):
Title : Nasty, Brutish, and Large: Cultural Difference and Otherness in the Figuration of the Trollwomen of the "Fornaldar sögur" [The author analyzes the encounters that heroes have with trollwomen in various legendary sagas (written down in the 13th and 14th centuries but circulating orally well before those centuries); the author argues that the mythic events can also be interpreted as sociological realities in which the trolls are Sámi women, threatening in their odd customs and strange appearance].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 73., 2 (Summer 2001):  Pages 105 - 123.
Year of Publication: 2001.

134. Record Number: 5976
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Damned Dowagers: The Representation of the Queen Mothers in Chaucer's "Man of Law's Tale"
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Scandinavian Studies , 73., 2 (Summer 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

135. Record Number: 6086
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sultana and Her Sisters: Black Women in the British Isles Before 1530
Source: Women's History Review , 10., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 187 - 210.
Year of Publication: 2001.

136. Record Number: 7910
Author(s): Schotter, Anne Howland.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rape in the Medieval Latin Comedies
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Women's History Review , 10., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 241 - 253.
Year of Publication: 2001.

137. Record Number: 6666
Author(s): Hilles, Carroll.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Politics in Osbern Bokenham's Legendary [the author argues that Bokenham's works advance the claim of Richard, duke of York, for the throne; not only does Bokenham question Lancastrian political hegemony, in part by denying the authority of the literature patronized by the court, but also "Bokenham strategically deploys 'woman' as signifier of privacy, piety, and humility to develop a language of political dissent which anticipates the tactics of later Yorkist propaganda." (page 209)].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 189 - 212.
Year of Publication: 2001.

138. Record Number: 10108
Author(s): Towell, Julie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Transforming Power: Mis-Glossing Female Figures in "Beowulf" and "Judith" [Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Medieval Association, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, October 14-16, 1999, Session 4: "Anglo-Saxon Appropriations: Translating, Glossing, Editing Old English Texts."]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):
Year of Publication: 2000.

139. Record Number: 4593
Author(s): Harding, Carol E.
Contributor(s):
Title : True Lovers: Love and Irony in Murasaki Shikibu and Christine de Pizan [the author examines the love affairs in "Livre du Duc" and the "Tale of Genji," arguing that the authors question the values of courtly life where men have far more choices in love affairs].
Source: Crossing the Bridge: Comparative Essays on Medieval European and Heian Japanese Women Writers.   Edited by Barbara Stevenson and Cynthia Ho .   Palgrave, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 153 - 173.
Year of Publication: 2000.

140. Record Number: 5014
Author(s): Finke, Laurie A. and Martin B. Shichtman
Contributor(s):
Title : Magical Mistress Tour: Patronage, Intellectual Property, and the Dissemination of Wealth in the "Lais" of Marie de France
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 25, 2 (Winter 2000): 479-503. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

141. Record Number: 4467
Author(s): Menuge, Noël James.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Few Home Truths: The Medieval Mother as Guardian in Romance and Law [The author examines the roles of mothers and step-mothers in legal treatises and wardship romances; both genres favor the interests of a patrilineal, primogenitive feudal society by showing family members as untrustworthy and only the lord as reliable].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 77 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2000.

142. Record Number: 7171
Author(s): Ives, Margaret and Almut Suerbaum
Contributor(s):
Title : The Middle Ages [The authors provide a brief overview of women authors in Germany, surveying female scribes, religious writers, and later women authors at princely courts. The individuals described include the monastic scribes, Gisela of Kerssenbrock and Guda, the religious writers, Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, Frau Ava, Hildegard of Bingen, and Mechthild von Magdeburg, and the noble women, Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrücken and Eleonore von Schottland. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women's Writing in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.   Edited by Jo Catling .   Cambridge University Press, 2000.  Pages 13 - 26.
Year of Publication: 2000.

143. Record Number: 5012
Author(s): Whittaker, Eve M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's "Eliduc": The Play of "Aventure"
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 6., 40181 ( 2000):  Pages 3 - 57.
Year of Publication: 2000.

144. Record Number: 5461
Author(s): Whitehead, Christiania.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fortress and a Shield: The Representation of the Virgin in the "Château d'amour" of Robert Grosseteste
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 6., 40181 ( 2000):  Pages 109 - 132.
Year of Publication: 2000.

145. Record Number: 5492
Author(s): Mehl, Dieter.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lover's Complaint: Shakespeare and Chaucer [The author argues that Shakespeare was influenced by Chaucer's "Squire's Tale" when writing his poem, "A Lover's Complaint"; in both the abandoned woman bemoans her fate but the authors hold back from identifying with her so that the accused male seems l
Source: Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 237., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 133 - 138.
Year of Publication: 2000.

146. Record Number: 5462
Author(s): Boklund-Lagopoulou, Karin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Yate of Heven: Conceptions of the Female Body in the Religious Lyrics [The author explores a variety of images including Jesus as nourishing mother, the soul as the bride of Christ, the body as the site of decay and corruption, and the closed, virginal body].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 133 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2000.

147. Record Number: 4542
Author(s): Barolini, Teodolinda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dante and Francesca da Rimini: Realpolitik, Romance, Gender [The author explores the minimal historical evidence for Francesca da Polenta, wife of Gianciotto Malatesta and lover of his brother, Paolo; in contrast Dante memorializes Francesca with a striking, psychological portrait].
Source: Speculum , 75., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 1 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2000.

148. Record Number: 4843
Author(s): Al-Sajdi, Dana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Trespassing the Male Domain: The "Qasidah" of Layla Al-Akhyaliyyah ["Here, she trespasses in the male domain by composing her poetry in a historically and experientially male form, but retains her female poetic voice by manipulating the form in such a way as to empty it of the male experience and re-inscribe it with her own poetic voice." Page 143; the Appendix presents the poem in Arabic].
Source: Journal of Arabic Literature , 31., 2 ( 2000):  Pages 121 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2000.

149. Record Number: 10115
Author(s): Dugan, Holly
Contributor(s):
Title : Judith: Fictive Construct, Real Woman
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 102: "Fruits of the 1999 NEH Summer Institute on Anglo-Saxon England I: Old Englsih Poetry and Lang
Year of Publication: 2000.

150. Record Number: 5300
Author(s): Myers, Jeffrey Rayner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Pardoner as Female Eunuch [The author argues that the Pardoner is not a homosexual or a eunuch but a cross dressing woman who supports the Wife of Bath's defense of women and may have a heterosexual relationship with the Summoner].
Source: Studia Neophilologica , 72., ( 2000):  Pages 54 - 62.
Year of Publication: 2000.

151. Record Number: 6502
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Voices in Convents, Courts, and Households: The French Middle Ages [the author provides an overview of medieval French women authors that is nuanced and full of insights; she briefly discusses the writings of Radegund and Baudonivia, Dhuoda, Heloise, Clemence of Barking, Marie de France, trobaritz and female-voiced poems from Northern France, Marguerite d'Oingt, Marguerite Porete, and Christine de Pizan].
Source: A History of Women's Writing in France.   Edited by Sonya Stephens .   Cambridge University Press, 2000. Studia Neophilologica , 72., ( 2000):  Pages 10 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2000.

152. Record Number: 4638
Author(s): Bornholdt, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tricked into the Tower: The "Crescentia" Tower Episode of the "Kaiserchronik" as Proto-"Märe" [The author examines the story of Crescentia who fends off her brother-in-law's sexual advances by cleverly outwitting him].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 99., 3 (July 2000):  Pages 395 - 411.
Year of Publication: 2000.

153. Record Number: 4578
Author(s): Stevenson, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Re-Visioning the Widow Christine de Pizan [The author argues that critics have misread Christine by concentrating on her writings that deal with the autobiographical].
Source: Crossing the Bridge: Comparative Essays on Medieval European and Heian Japanese Women Writers.   Edited by Barbara Stevenson and Cynthia Ho .   Palgrave, 2000. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 99., 3 (July 2000):  Pages 29 - 44.
Year of Publication: 2000.

154. Record Number: 20896
Author(s): Morosini, Roberta
Contributor(s):
Title : Bone eloquence e mondo alla rovescia nel discorso "semblable a la reisun" nella novella di Madonna Filippa" ("Decameron" VI.7) [The tale of Madonna Filippa resembles Marie de France's fable about the peasant who demanded a higher price for his horse because the buyer had only seen the old half of the horse. The judge seeks to save Madonna Filippa's life when her husband brings a charge of adultery by employing a similar exercise in facile logic. He accepts Madonna Filippa's defense without objection, being moved by her beauty. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Italica , 77., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 2000.

155. Record Number: 10124
Author(s): Stratyner, Leslie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beyond "Gold-hroden": Oral Formulaic Theory and the Women of "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 461: "Beowulf III."
Year of Publication: 2000.

156. Record Number: 4807
Author(s): Lloyd-Morgan, Ceridwen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Querelle des Femmes": A Continuing Tradition in Welsh Women's Literature [the author analyzes a poem by the woman author Gwerful Mechain in which she responds to a diatribe against women by the male poet Ieuan Dyfi; Gwenful Mechain cites women fromWelsh history, the Bible and the classical tradition all who had important achievements].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 101 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2000.

157. Record Number: 10122
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Consequential Actions/ Marginality and Perversion: Breaking the Man-Monster Binary in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 347: "Beowulf I."
Year of Publication: 2000.

158. Record Number: 4764
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Peril: Sexuality and the Subversion of Order in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 41 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2000.

159. Record Number: 4508
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale" [The author compares the three versions of Griselda's tale; he argues that the differences are not as great as critics have maintained with Chaucer deriving more from Boccaccio than was previously believed].
Source: Studies in Philology , 97., 3 (Summer 2000):  Pages 255 - 275.
Year of Publication: 2000.

160. Record Number: 10112
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Into a Blind Alley: Reading Rosemary Woolf's "Juliana"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association of America, Chicago, December 27-30, 1999, Session 562: "Influential Editions in Old English: Shaping the Field."
Year of Publication: 2000.

161. Record Number: 5533
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Unnatural Authority: Translating Beyond the Heroic in "The Wife's Lament" [The author argues that translators and editors have been influenced by gender expectations in their reading and editing of the "Wife's Lament"].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 27., ( 2000):  Pages 19 - 31. Literacy and the Lay Reader
Year of Publication: 2000.

162. Record Number: 4581
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Romantic Entreaty in "The Kagero Diary" and "The Letters of Abelard and Heloise" [The author compares the requests of two women to renew contact with their lovers;