Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


13 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 24521
Author(s): Cooke, Jessica
Contributor(s):
Title : Scottish Queenship in the Thirteenth Century [The author notes the lack of scholarship on queens in Scotland. Her article concentrates on the lives of five queens consort. Nelson looks at their political roles and their reputations among their contemporaries. She is interested in how gender came into play both in their marital and natal families. Contrasts with English queens are also instructive. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 61 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2007.

2. Record Number: 12882
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the Ages of Woman [Phillips explores medieval ideas about women's lifecycle. Generally authors divided women's lives into three parts: maiden, wife, and widow. In her book, however, Margery Kempe does not adhere to this scheme. There is very little about her girlhood, and her role as wife is attenuated by a vow of chastity. In this regard, as in others, the "Book of Margery Kempe" presents a unique view of life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "The Book of Margery Kempe."   Edited by John H. Arnold and Katherine J. Lewis .   D. S. Brewer, 2004. Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 17 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 14093
Author(s): Goldberg, P. J. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Migration, Youth, and Gender in Later Medieval England [The author looks at English records from church courts and from taxation. He concludes that most migrants were young and travelled relatively short distances. In addition, women were more likely to move away from home than men. Goldberg adds that, while migration was a lifecycle phase for many young people, some individuals because of poverty were obligated to remain migrant servants or laborers all their lives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Youth in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. J. P. Goldberg and Felicity Riddy .   York Medieval Press in association with the Boydell Press, 2004. Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 85 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 11946
Author(s): DeAragon, RaGena C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wife, Widow, and Mother: Some Comparisons between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Noblewomen of the Anglo-Norman and Angevin World [The author compares life cycle events for Eleanor of Aquitaine to those of Anglo-Norman and Angevin countesses between 1070 and 1230. The author briefly considers childhood, marriage, childbearing, parenting, widowhood, remarriage, ecclesiastical patrona
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 97 - 113.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 10909
Author(s): Mulder-Bakker, Anneke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jeanne of Valois: The Power of a Consort [The author argues that Jeanne of Valois exercised a variety of divergent powers in part changing with the stage of her lifecycle. Even as a widow in retirement at the family monastery, she was sought as a mediator for disagreements ranging from family feuds to international conflict. Title notes supplied by Feminae. ].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 253 - 269.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 13052
Author(s): Cullum, P. H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life-Cycle and Life-Course in a Clerical and Celibate Milieu: Northern England in the Later Middle Ages [The author compares the life-cycles of clergy with those of laymen. In many cases the clerics experienced an extended adolescence. Not infrequently they also lived in poverty in both youth and old age. When clerics set up households, they often created quasi-families either with blood nephews or with promising young men whom they treated as their sons. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Time and eternity: the medieval discourse.   Edited by Gerhard Jaritz and Gerson Moreno-RiaƱo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2003. Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2007):  Pages 271 - 281.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 8806
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Aristocratic Teenaged Female: Adolescent or Adult? [The author argues that there was a more "fluid scale of ages" for women than for men, particularly involving royalty and the nobility. Young women could act decisively and authoritatively when helping their husbands or protecting their children. Parsons points to the case of Isabelle of Hainaut who at fourteen performed a dramatic public prayer to win public support and prevent her husband's planned divorce. Elizabeth Plantagenet, Countess of Holland, at fiften years enlisted the help of the Hague's burgers to rescue her young husband who had been kidnapped by the regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 311 - 321.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 8727
Author(s): Jussen, Bernhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virgins- Widows- Spouses: On the Language of Moral Distinction as Applied to Women and Men in the Middle Ages
Source: History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 13 - 32.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 6748
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daughters, Mothers, Wives, and Widows: Women as Legal Persons [The author traces women's legal agency across the life span; each phase had its limits even widowhood in which many women had to struggle for the return of their dowry or accept remarriage at their natal family's behest].
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001. History of the Family , 7., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 5998
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Women in France and England, 1050- 1300
Source: Journal of Women's History (Full Text via Project Muse) 12, 4 (Winter 2001): 22-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 6746
Author(s): Seidel Menchi, Silvana.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Girl and the Hourglass: Periodization of Women's Lives in Western Preindustrial Societies [The author examines various models that were used to indicate the significant ages in men's and women's lives; in the latter half of the article, the author concentrates on medieval Italian child brides, using case studies, prescriptive literature, and l
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 41 - 74.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 6750
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Space, Time, and the Power of Aristocratic Wives in Yorkist and Early Tudor England, 1450-1550 [The author argues that the stages of life that noble wives generally moved through were complex, both in terms of their increasing responsibilities and the spaces in which they lived and to which they traveled].
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 245 - 264.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 4022
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maidenhood as the Perfect Age of Woman's Life [The author explores the idea of what was the ideal age for women, drawing evidence from the "Pearl," stories of the virgin martyrs, and representations of the Virgin Mary during the Assumption and the Coronation].
Source: Young Medieval Women.   Edited by Katherine J. Lewis, Noel James Menuge, and Kim M. Phillips .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1999.