Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


16 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 645
Author(s): Brockington, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Separating Sword in the "Tristan" Romances: Possible Celtic Analogues Re- examined [author argues that the Irish tales of Diarmaid and Grainne do not provide a source for the chaste lovers discovered sleeping by King Marc].
Source: Modern Language Review , 91., 2 (Apr. 1996):  Pages 281 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1996.

2. Record Number: 4360
Author(s): Wong, Donna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Water-Births: Murder, Mystery and Medb Lethderg [the author argues that the many stories of Eithne and her son, Furbaide (cut from her side after she has died or been murdered), descended from tales in which lakes burst out from rivers; in the appendix the author summarizes the circumstances of Furbaide's birth from the "Cóir Anmann," "Cath Boinde," "Metrical Dindshenchas," "Rennes Dindshenchas," and "Bodleian Dinnshenchas"].
Source: Études Celtiques , 32., ( 1996):  Pages 233 - 241.
Year of Publication: 1996.

3. Record Number: 669
Author(s): Neville, Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Short Shrouds and Sharp Shrews: Echoes of Jacques de Vitry in the "Dánta Grádha" [exemplum about the wife who skimps on her husband's funeral].
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Études Celtiques , 32., ( 1996):  Pages 87 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1996.

4. Record Number: 667
Author(s): Clancy, Thomas Owen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Poets in Early Medieval Ireland: Stating the Case
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Études Celtiques , 32., ( 1996):  Pages 43 - 72.
Year of Publication: 1996.

5. Record Number: 640
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Eithne in Gubai [Eithne of the Lament appears in two texts, identified as the wife and the aunt of the hero Cú Chulainn].
Source: Éigse: A Journal of Irish Studies , 28., ( 1995):  Pages 160 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1995.

6. Record Number: 1085
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Banshenchas" Revisited [both versions, the verse and later prose text, reveal an aristocratic circle that intermarried for political purposes; liberal divorce laws allowed multiple marriages for women as well as men].
Source: Chattel, Servant, or Citizen: Women's Status in Church, State, and Society.   Edited by Mary O' Dowd and Sabine Wichert .   Historical Studies 19. Papers Read Before the XXIst Irish Conference of Historians, Held at Queen's University of Belfast, 27-30 May 1993. Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen's University of Belfast, 1995. Éigse: A Journal of Irish Studies , 28., ( 1995):  Pages 70 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1995.

7. Record Number: 1353
Author(s): Corthals, Johan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affiliation of Children: "Immathchor nAilella Ocus Airt"
Source: Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland , 9., ( 1995):  Pages 92 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1995.

8. Record Number: 63
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Do Not Marry the Fat Short One: The Early Irish Wisdom on Women
Source: Journal of Women's History , 6., 4 (Winter/Spring 1995):  Pages 137 - 159. (6, 4 / 7, 1)
Year of Publication: 1995.

9. Record Number: 1747
Author(s): Olsen, Karin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cuckold's Revenge : Reconstructing Six Irish "Roscada" in "Táin Bó Cúailnge" [dialogue among the cuckolded king Ailill, his queen Medb, and her lover, the warror-hero Fergus].
Source: Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies , 28., (Winter 1994):  Pages 51 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1994.

10. Record Number: 10796
Author(s): Rebbert, Maria A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Celtic Origins of the Chess Symbolism in "Milun" and "Eliduc" [The author considers the significance of Marie's chess scenes by comparing them to similar “fidchell” scenes in several Old Irish tales. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In Quest of Marie de France: A Twelfth-Century Poet.   Edited by Chantal A. Marechal .   Edwin Mellen Press, 1992. Journal of the History of Sexuality , 3., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 148 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1992.

11. Record Number: 7243
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conceived in Sins, Born in Delights: Stories of Procreation from Early Ireland [The author argues that the surviving narratives of sex, conception, pregnancy, and childbirth from eight and ninth-century Ireland represent an exclusively male ideology, and reveal masculine attempts to co-opt the procreative process more generally. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality , 3., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 1992.

12. Record Number: 12687
Author(s): Ireland, Colin A.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Coverchief or a Calle: The Ultimate End of the Wife of Bath's Search for Sovereignty [The author suggests that the Wife of Bath and her tale may be influenced by Irish stories both in the figure of the Loathly Lady who awards sovereignty over the kingdom and in the meaning of the word "calle" (Middle English: hair net, headdress) (Modern English "caul"). The author argues that Chaucer may be drawing on the Irish words "caille" (veil) and "caillech" (veiled one) to give a metaphorical meaning to "calle" as a marker of a woman's station in life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 150 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1991.

13. Record Number: 11208
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Branwen, "Beowulf," and the Tragic Peaceweaver Tale.
Source: Viator , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1991.

14. Record Number: 8951
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Bardic Themes: The Trinity in the Blessed Virgin's Womb, and the Rain of Folly [The author explores the theme of the Trinity in the Virgin's womb, beginning with the Irish poet Donnchadh Mór Ó Dálaigh. Breeze traces the theme in Welsh, English, and Continental verse as well as in sculptures known as "vierges ouvrantes." These statues of the Virgin and child open to reveal another scene inside, sometimes the Trinity in her womb as discussed here, but also other motifs including the Joys of the Virgin or her Sorrows. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Celtica , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 1 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1991.

15. Record Number: 12740
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin Mary, Daughter of Her Son [The “mater et filia” topos, or the notion of the Virgin Mary as being simultaneously the mother and daughter of Christ, originated in the writings of late Antiquity but the theme also appears in the early poetry of Ireland and Britain. The first known reference to the topos in Ireland occurs in the seventh century Latin poem; an eleventh century poem written in the Irish language is perhaps the oldest vernacular example of the topos. The earliest example of the topos in Welsh poetry probably dates from around 1400. In all these instances, poets borrow and adapt ideas about the Virgin Mary from Continental sources like sermons, Church teachings, or poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Études Celtiques , 27., ( 1990):  Pages 267 - 283.
Year of Publication: 1990.

16. Record Number: 12730
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Blessed Virgin's Joys and Sorrows [Based upon a comparison with analogous material in English, Latin, and Anglo-Norman texts, the author establishes the dating and attribution of three religious poems (two in Welsh and one in Irish) that concern the Virgin's joys and sorrows. Although the manuscripts attribute the three poems to three thirteenth century poets, the textual evidence indicates that they were actually written by three entirely different poets in the fourteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 19., (Summer 1990):  Pages 41 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1990.