Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


107 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27619
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Property Conflicts in Late Medieval England
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight. The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.  Pages 187 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 28443
Author(s): Meyer, Andreas,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sweet Beloved and His Legacy: A Lawsuit for Love and Money from Lucca (1237)
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010.  Pages 86 - 100.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 28347
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Gallagher, Eric James, translator
Title : Agnes, who was the wife of Adam the son of Robert, claims against Waleran de Muncy… [Item 300 from the hundred of Blything concerns Agnes who pleads on her own behalf because her husband has been outlawed. She recovers land because it was part of her marriage portion (“maritagium”). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Civil Pleas of the Suffolk Eyre of 1240.   Edited by Eric James Gallagher Suffolk Records Society, 52.   Boydell Press , 2009.  Pages 53 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2009.

4. Record Number: 28351
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Gallagher, Eric James, translator
Title : Geoffrey de Say and Alina his wife claim against Alexander de Vallibus the advowson of the church of Cringlefor… [Item 153 from Cattishall is the first of several pleas in which Alina tried to recover her dower from a previous marriage to Hubert de Vallibus. See related items 475, 526, 727, and 1038. In these cases Alina did not recover any land, but Eric Gallagher cites evidence from the “Curia Regis” rolls that Alina and Geoffrey did win one plea eventually (p. xliii). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Civil Pleas of the Suffolk Eyre of 1240.   Edited by Eric James Gallagher Suffolk Records Society, 52.   Boydell Press , 2009.  Pages 21 - 21.
Year of Publication: 2009.

5. Record Number: 20600
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage, Concubinage, and the Law [The author analyzes the meaning of concubinage in the Middle Ages with some references to ancient Roman practices. In the later Middle Ages "concubine" came to have two separate meanings: 1) A woman who lived with a man in a domestic arrangement but was not married to him and 2) In a more technical sense "concubine" was used as a legal term for a status that accorded some rights but was inferior to that of wives. Includes a detailed look at a 15th century legal opinion as to whether a priest's concubine and son could receive legacies from the cleric. The suit was brought by the chief heir, the priest's brother. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Law and the Illicit in Medieval Europe.   Edited by Ruth Mazo Karras, Joel Kaye, and E. Ann Matter .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.  Pages 117 - 129.
Year of Publication: 2008.

6. Record Number: 20608
Author(s): Seabourne, Gwen
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Brittany and Her Treatment by King John and Henry III [Eleanor of Brittany, daughter of Geoffrey Plantagenet, older brother of King John of England, did not lead the life expected of noble women. She did not succeed to any of her father's territories nor did she marry. Instead King John and his son, Henry III, held her in confinement for over 40 years. Seabourne argues that at first the conditions were conceived as guardianship. There were even some efforts made toward advantageous marriages for Eleanor. Nothing materialized, and her supervision became more strict. Henry III held her prisoner until her death even though in those later years she could no longer bear children to threaten the royal succession. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 73 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2007.

7. Record Number: 19528
Author(s): Dabrowska, Malgorzata
Contributor(s):
Title : Ought One to Marry? Manuel II Palaiologos' Point of View [The Emperor Manuel wrote a dialog on marriage between 1394 and 1397. His aim was to emphasize how important inheritance was for the imperial family. Dabrowska suggests that the emperor later revised the text to encourage his own son to marry. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 31., 2 ( 2007):  Pages 146 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2007.

8. Record Number: 18624
Author(s): Bradbrooke, S. M. and W. G. Wiseman
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret Prestwich and the Priory of Seaton
Source: Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archeological Society. Third Series , 6., ( 2006):  Pages 77 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2006.

9. Record Number: 19951
Author(s): Taylor, Craig
Contributor(s):
Title : The Salic Law, French Queenship, and the Defense of Women in the Late Middle Ages
Source: French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 543 - 564.
Year of Publication: 2006.

10. Record Number: 10449
Author(s): Guerra Medici, Maria Teresa.
Contributor(s):
Title : La successione delle figlie nel feudo: il feudo materno e l'opinio Baldi
Source: VI Centenario della morte di Baldo degli Ubaldi 1400-2000.   Edited by Carla Frova, Maria Graza Nico Ottaviani, and Stefania Zucchini .   Universita degli studi, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 263 - 288.
Year of Publication: 2005.

11. Record Number: 14144
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Gifts and Fashion Mischief [Susan Mosher Stuard in "Marriage Gifts and Fashion Mischief" details Italian wedding transactions, including the Lombard "male dowry," and the Roman bride's fiscal gift to her husband. She links the increasing pressure from husbands to receive liquid ass
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 169 - 185. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter V.
Year of Publication: 2005.

12. Record Number: 14142
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dilemma of the Widow of Property for Late Medieval London [The author argues that wealthy widows, with both capital and property, served as conduits of wealth. Widows tended to remarry within the same social group to which their previous husbands had belonged, strengthening guild and status solidarities. Title n
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 135 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2005.

13. Record Number: 11455
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Threads Bared: Dress and Textiles in Late Medieval English Wills [The author analyzes 550 wills from London and Canterbury dating from 1327 to 1487. the majority are from artisans and merchants with 16.5% made by women. Women tended to bequeath more items than men, especially clothing and household textiles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 133 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2005.

14. Record Number: 10879
Author(s): Guzzetti, Linda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Inheritance and Testamentary Practices in Late Fourteenth- and Early Fifteenth-Century Venice and Ghent
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 79 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 28213
Author(s): Brizio, Elena
Contributor(s):
Title : La dote nella normativa statutaria e nella pratica testamentaria Senese (fine sec. XII- metà sec. XIV) [Sienese law imposed limits on women's control of property, but women were able to enjoy some legal protections. These included having their dowries protected from an insolvent husband and restitution of dowry when widowed. Women also could be guardians of minor children, and they disposed of property through wills. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Bullettino Senese di Storia Patria , 111., ( 2004):  Pages 9 - 39.
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 14752
Author(s): Goldy, Charlotte Newman.
Contributor(s):
Title : The shiftiness of a woman: Narratizing the Anstey Case [The author examines documents surrounding an inheritance case that hinged on the legitimacy of a disputed marriage. From the court case reported by John of Salisbury, Goldy reconstructs the daughter Mabel's efforts to right the wrongs done to her mother. At the same time John of Salisbury leaves hints that the report of the father's deathbed remorse for abandoning Mabel's mother in favor of his previous bethrothed should not be trusted. After five years of litigation, church courts found in favor of the father's nephew and declared Mabel illegitimate. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 89 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2004.

17. Record Number: 14749
Author(s): Doyle, Kara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Narratizing Marie of Ponthieu [The author analyzes three texts related to the life of Marie, countess of Ponthieu. She was heir to her father's holdings of Ponthieu but her husband's rebellion against the French king, Philippe Auguste, resulted in the forfeiture of her inheritance. Marie negotiated a settlement with Louis VIII, Philippe Auguste's successor. The three texts analyzed are: 1) the legal agreement between Marie and Lous VIII restoring her land and the inheritance rights to her children; 2) the "Roman de la Violette" by Gerbert de Montreuil in which Marie is acknowledged as patron; and the anonymous "Fille de comte de Ponthieu" in which the heroine's resemblance to Marie is less direct. Significantly all three texts downplay women's agency and do not portray the woman as holding land. Evidence suggests that Marie took direct action to regain her family's lands and privileges Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 29 - 54.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 8706
Author(s): de Trafford, Claire.
Contributor(s):
Title : Share and Share Alike? The Marriage Portion, Inheritance, and Family Politics [The author explores the use of the marriage portion or "maritagium" given by the bride's family, usually in the form of land or rents. Since wives had a say in the disposal of their "maritagia," it tended to increase their status in the family. Also there was an effort to provide for all children, including daughters, rather than the later emphasis on a sole male heir with primogeniture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women: Pawns or Players?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2003. Bullettino Senese di Storia Patria , 111., ( 2004):  Pages 36 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2003.

19. Record Number: 8708
Author(s): Kenny, Gillian.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Power of Dower: The Importance of Dower in the Lives of Medieval Women in Ireland [The author argues that the financial resources made available to widows from their dowers transformed their lives. They took over many of their husbands' roles including bringing suits in court and donating to local religious institutions. Both the widows and their heirs sometimes had difficulties accustoming themselves to the changes in power. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women: Pawns or Players?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2003. Bullettino Senese di Storia Patria , 111., ( 2004):  Pages 59 - 74.
Year of Publication: 2003.

20. Record Number: 6230
Author(s): Stabler, Tanya
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Choices, Women's Charities: Gender and Testamentary Practice in High Medieval Paris
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Bullettino Senese di Storia Patria , 111., ( 2004):
Year of Publication: 2002.

21. Record Number: 7440
Author(s): Golinelli, Paolo.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Italia dopo la lotta per le investiture: la questione dell'eredità matildica [Matilda of Tuscany acquired the lands of the Canossa line, the possessions of the Marquisate of Tuscany, and various territorial acquisitions. After her death some of the territories were lost to other hands, including local self-rule. The remainder became an additional bone of contention between the Empire and the papacy. The remaining inheritance finally became one basis of the Papal States. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 42., 2 (Dicembre 2001):  Pages 509 - 528.
Year of Publication: 2001.

22. Record Number: 5818
Author(s): Payling, S. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Economics of Marriage in Late Medieval England: The Marriage of Heiresses
Source: Economic History Review , 54., 3 (August 2001):  Pages 413 - 429.
Year of Publication: 2001.

23. Record Number: 8956
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Circulation of Books [The author argues that patronage has been regarded as the dominant, if not exclusive, means by which people acquired books at the French court. However, there were other ways that women were more likely to have books including inheritance, wedding presents, and New Year's Day gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 9 - 31. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

24. Record Number: 6749
Author(s): Kirshner, Julius.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Married Elsewhere: Gender and Citizenship in Italy
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 117 - 149. Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy. Edited by Julius Kirshner. University of Toronto Press, 2015. Pages 161-188.
Year of Publication: 2001.

25. Record Number: 6742
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Medieval Colonial Society: The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem in the Twelfth Century [The author argues that noble and royal women in the Crusader Kingdom had a better legal status and more freedom of action than women in Europe because the conditions of constant war often overruled traditional gender roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Crusades.   Edited by Susan B. Edgington and Sarah Lambert .   University of Wales Press, 2001. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 140 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2001.

26. Record Number: 10111
Author(s): Drout, Michael D. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Deeds: Gender, Inheritance, and Death in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association of America, Chicago, December 27-30, 1999, Session 314: "Ways of Reading Old English Texts: Colonialism, Gender, and Identity."
Year of Publication: 2000.

27. Record Number: 4467
Author(s): Menuge, Noël James.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Few Home Truths: The Medieval Mother as Guardian in Romance and Law [The author examines the roles of mothers and step-mothers in legal treatises and wardship romances; both genres favor the interests of a patrilineal, primogenitive feudal society by showing family members as untrustworthy and only the lord as reliable].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 77 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2000.

28. Record Number: 6307
Author(s): Todt, Klaus-Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Frau als Selbstherrscher: Kaiserin Theodora. Die letzte Angehörige der makedonischen Dynastie
Source: Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Byzantinistik , 50., ( 2000):  Pages 139 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2000.

29. Record Number: 16584
Author(s): Friedrichs, Rhoda Lange.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rich Old Ladies Made Poor: The Vulnerability of Women's Property in Late Medieval England
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 21., ( 2000):  Pages 211 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2000.

30. Record Number: 16570
Author(s): Wilkinson, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pawn and Political Player: Observations on the Life of a Thirteenth-Century Countess
Source: Historical Research , 73., 181 (June 2000):  Pages 105 - 123.
Year of Publication: 2000.

31. Record Number: 4621
Author(s): Klein, Elka
Contributor(s):
Title : The Widow's Portion: Law, Custom, and Marital Property among Medieval Catalan Jews
Source: Viator , 31., ( 2000):  Pages 147 - 163.
Year of Publication: 2000.

32. Record Number: 4466
Author(s): Lewis, Katherine J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Testamentary Discourse, and Life-Writing in Later Medieval England [the author examines wills of 19 women and those of their husbands as autobiographical compositions; she notes differences between female and male wills with women leaving clothing and jewelry rather than land and remembering a network of female relatives, friends, and servants].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Viator , 31., ( 2000):  Pages 57 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2000.

33. Record Number: 4464
Author(s): Smith, Jennifer.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unfamiliar Territory: Women, Land, and Law in Occitania, 1130-1250
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Viator , 31., ( 2000):  Pages 19 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2000.

34. Record Number: 6286
Author(s): Störmer-Caysa, Uta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Kriemhilds erste Ehe: Ein Vorschlag zum Verständnis von Siegfrieds Tod im Nibelungenlied
Source: Neophilologus , 83., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 93 - 113.
Year of Publication: 1999.

35. Record Number: 6288
Author(s): Weinfurter, Stefan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Kaiserin Adelheid und das ottonische Kaisertum
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 33., ( 1999):  Pages 1 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1999.

36. Record Number: 5586
Author(s): Fazio, Ida.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le ricchezze e le donne: Verso una ri-problematizzazione [much of the recent scholarship on women in the Middle Ages focuses on patrimony; this includes the study of legal norms, especially those of Roman law, applied to dowry; asymmetrical family strategies, in which women benefited less than men did, are crucial to these studies, although scholars disagree on specific interpretations].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 2 (Agosto 1999):  Pages 539 - 555.
Year of Publication: 1999.

37. Record Number: 7363
Author(s): Kaplan, Michel.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Aristocrate byzantine et sa Fortune [The author explores a number of cases where wealthy noble women administered their estates themselves and disposed of their properties and other goods. The women profiled include Danielis, a weathy and powerful noble woman associated with Emperor Basil I, Eudocie Bourion, who sold some of her dowry lands while her husband was still alive, Empress Irene Doukaina, Kale Basiliake, a wealthy young woman who became a nun upon her husband's death. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Femmes et pouvoirs des femmes à Byzance et en Occident (VIe -XIe siècles). Colloque international organisé les 28, 29 et 30 mars 1996 à Bruxelles et Villeneuve d'Ascq.   Edited by Stéphane Lebecq, Alain Dierkens, Régine Le Jan, and Jean-Marie Sansterre .   Centre de Recherche sur l'Histoire de l'Europe du Nord-Ouest, Université Charles de Gaulle-Lille 3, 1999. Quaderni Storici , 2 (Agosto 1999):  Pages 205 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1999.

38. Record Number: 3700
Author(s): Crick, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Posthumous Benefaction, and Family Strategy in Pre-Conquest England [The author analyzes wills in which women play a prominent part, particularly in the granting and receiving of property; the author argues that women cared for family property and passed it on to the church as the original donors wished].
Source: Journal of British Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 38, 4 (October 1999): 399-422 Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

39. Record Number: 4759
Author(s): Crick, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men, Women, and Widows: Widowhood in Pre-Conquest England [the author argues that the Christian idea of monogamous marriage did not change habits of concubinage in Anglo-Saxon England; therefore, "widow" was a term used by the Church only for certain specific cases, not for all the women that we would consider widows].
Source: Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner .   Women and Men in History. Longman, 1999.  Pages 24 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1999.

40. Record Number: 4761
Author(s): Chabot, Isabelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lineage Strategies and the Control of Widows in Renaissance Florence [The author argues that to ensure the male monopoly over wealth and power, men manipulated maternity (ranging from relationships with children to inheritance) for the interests of their patrilineage].
Source: Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner .   Women and Men in History. Longman, 1999.  Pages 127 - 144.
Year of Publication: 1999.

41. Record Number: 4760
Author(s): Skinner, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Widow's Options in Medieval Southern Italy [The author analyzes data from charters and finds 215 documented widows up to 1100].
Source: Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner .   Women and Men in History. Longman, 1999.  Pages 57 - 65.
Year of Publication: 1999.

42. Record Number: 9549
Author(s): Allegrezza, Franca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Legami di affinita nel baronato romano: il caso degli Orsini (xiii-xiv secc.) [Beginning in the early13th century, marriages united Rome's new nobility. The Orsini are a notable example of this homogenous group of nobles. Eventually branches of the Orsini clan began to intermarry. Beginning in the reign of the Orsini pope Nicholas III (1277-1280), the family began to diversify its marriage strategy by intermarrying with noble families from central and Southern Italy. Still, it tried to keep inheritance from dispersing the family's patrimony to daughters, bastards, and sons in the clergy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Le ricchezze delle donne: Diritti patrimoniali e poteri familiari in Italia (xiii-xix secc.).   Edited by Giulia Calvi and Isabelle Chabot .   Rosenberg & Sellier, 1998. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 42., ( 1998):  Pages 21 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1998.

43. Record Number: 13752
Author(s): Moore, R. I.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Marriage, and the Eleventh-Century Revolution: A Context for Early Medieval Communism
Source: Medieval Purity and Piety: Essays on Medieval Clerical Celibacy and Religious Reform.   Edited by Michael Frassetto Garland Medieval Casebooks Series .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 33., ( 1999):  Pages 179 - 208.
Year of Publication: 1998.

44. Record Number: 4826
Author(s): Turville-Petre, Thorlac.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Persecution of Elizabeth Swillington by Ralph, Lord Cromwell [The author explores the case of Elizabeth Swillington, whom Cromwell went to extreme measures to force to renounce her rights to a large inheritance; the appendix presents an edition of Elizabeth's "Compleyntis"].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 42., ( 1998):  Pages 174 - 187.
Year of Publication: 1998.

45. Record Number: 3508
Author(s): Haskett, Timothy S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Curteys Women in Chancery: The Legacy of Henry and Rye Brown [the author examines two wills from a husband and a wife along with a Chancery bill from five female relatives of the husband who ask for help in obtaining some property wrongly appropriated by the husband's executor; appendices include the requests and directions of Henry Browne and Rye Browne, and an edition of the Chancery bill from the Curteys women].
Source: Women, Marriage, and Family in Medieval Christendom: Essays in Memory of Michael M. Sheehan, C.S.B.   Edited by Constance M. Rousseau and Joel T. Rosenthal .   Western Michigan University, 1998. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 42., ( 1998):  Pages 349 - 398.
Year of Publication: 1998.

46. Record Number: 2736
Author(s): Rivers, Theodore John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Legal Status of Widows in Late Anglo-Saxon England [argues that widows at this time had exceptional opportunities under the protection of the king and lords; the author argues that the power of kin over widows was diminished based in part on the examples of widows' inheritance of bookland].
Source: Medievalia Et Humanistica New Series , 24., ( 1997):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1997.

47. Record Number: 3301
Author(s): Goez, Werner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Über die Mathildischen Schenkungen an die Römische Kirche
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 31., ( 1997):  Pages 158 - 196.
Year of Publication: 1997.

48. Record Number: 2326
Author(s): Cosandey, Fanny.
Contributor(s):
Title : De lance en quenouille. La place de la reine dans l'État moderne (14e- 17e siècles)
Source: Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 52., 4 (juillet-août 1997):  Pages 799 - 820.
Year of Publication: 1997.

49. Record Number: 2324
Author(s): Smail, Daniel Lord.
Contributor(s):
Title : Démanteler le patrimoine. Les femmes et les biens dans la Marseille médiévale
Source: Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 52., 2 (mars-avril 1997):  Pages 343 - 368.
Year of Publication: 1997.

50. Record Number: 2206
Author(s): Livingstone, Amy
Contributor(s):
Title : Noblewomen's Control of Property in Early Twelfth-Century Blois-Chartres
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1997.

51. Record Number: 1998
Author(s): Emigh, Rebecca Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Land Tenure, Household Structure, and Age at Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany
Source: Journal of Interdisciplinary History (Full Text via JSTOR) 27, 4 (Spring 1997): 613-635. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

52. Record Number: 1918
Author(s): Schulman, N. M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Husband, Father, Bishop? Grosseteste in Paris [suggests, based on a bequest of a house, that Grosseteste may have lived in Paris for over twenty years and had a wife and three children; the article includes a edition of the bequest from the cartulary of Sainte-Opportune].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 72, 2 (April 1997): 330-346. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 670
Author(s): Ó' Cleirigh, Cormac.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Absentee Landlady and the Sturdy Robbers: Agnes de Valence [Agnes de Valence's inheritance of her Irish husband's estates prompted a fifteen year struggle with John fitzThomas. He succeeded through theft, intimidation, and perserverance].
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Scandinavian Journal of History , 21., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 101 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1996.

54. Record Number: 823
Author(s): Bestor, Jane Fair.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bastardy and Legitimacy in the Formation of a Regional State in Italy: The Estense Succession
Source: Comparative Studies in Society and History (Full Text via JSTOR) 38, 3 (July 1996): 549-585. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

55. Record Number: 7448
Author(s): Chabot, Isabelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Risorse e diritti patrimoniali [The Black Death (1348) frequently put wealth into the hands of women by killing off male heirs. Subsequent efforts to limit a daughter's property to her dowry was counterbalanced by inheritance through wills. Roman law gave women an equal claim on an inheritance, but Italian statutes severely limited that right. The cities also were slow to let women inherit where any male heirs existed. Birth families often struggled with husbands over control of the daughter's dowry and had to claim restitution if the husband predeceased the wife. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996.  Pages 47 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1996.

56. Record Number: 745
Author(s): Kreutz, Barbara M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Twilight of "Morgengabe" [dowries and inheritance of women under Lombard law contrasted with those in Amalfi where Roman law was practiced ].
Source: Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Honor of David Herlihy.   Edited by Samual K. Cohn, Jr. and Steven A. Epstein .   University of Michigan Press, 1996. Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 31., ( 1997):  Pages 131 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1996.

57. Record Number: 546
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Understanding Gender Inequality in Renaissance Florence: Personhood and Gifts of Maternal Inheritance by Women
Source: Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 58 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1996.

58. Record Number: 1803
Author(s): Weinstock, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender, Geneaology, and the Politics of Lineage in Marie de France's "Eliduc" [International Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, May 1996].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 29 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1996.

59. Record Number: 681
Author(s): Affeldt, Werner.
Contributor(s):
Title : The English Noblewoman and Her Family in the Later Middle Ages [surviving sources show that family relations spanned a wide range of feeling].
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 119 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1996.

60. Record Number: 707
Author(s): Christelow, Stephanie Mooers.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Division of Inheritance and the Provision of Non- Inheriting Offspring Among the Anglo- Norman Elite [study of some fifty families over three generations with an emphasis on the careers of younger children through marriage, the Church, and royal service].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 17., 2 (Autumn 1996):  Pages 3 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1996.

61. Record Number: 1099
Author(s): Gates, Lori A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Widows, Property, and Remarriage: Lessons from Glastonbury's Deverill Manors [contrasts found in the manorial communities of Longbridge and Monkton, with the latter being less hospitable to widowed property holders; the author argues against a direct connection between land availability and widow remarriage, favoring instead a multiplicity of socio-economic conditions including labor pool, social hierarchy, manorial industries, age at widowhood, and children in the household.]
Source: Albion , 28., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 19 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1996.

62. Record Number: 708
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dowry and inheritance Patterns: Some Examples from the Descendants of King Henry I of England
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 17., 2 (Autumn 1996):  Pages 45 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1996.

63. Record Number: 1168
Author(s): Nors, Thyra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Illegitimate Children and Their High-Born Mothers: Changes in the Perception of Legitimacy in Mediaeval Denmark [distinctions made between children born from arranged concubinage, secret liaisons, and relations between freemen and bondswomen; the Church censured illegitimacy, causing a steep decline in status].
Source: Scandinavian Journal of History , 21., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 17 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1996.

64. Record Number: 511
Author(s): Hammer, Carl I.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Handmaid's Tale: Morganatic Relationships in Early- mediaeval Bavaria [evidence from law codes and deeds].
Source: Continuity and Change , 10., 3 (Dec. 1995):  Pages 345 - 368.
Year of Publication: 1995.

65. Record Number: 655
Author(s): Drell, Joanna H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Family Structure in the Principality of Salerno During the Norman Period, 1077- 1154 [extent of kin groups, for both noble and non- noble families, that participated in the management of family properties].
Source: Anglo-Norman Studies , 18., ( 1995):  Pages 79 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1995.

66. Record Number: 1572
Author(s): Johns, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wives and Widows of the Earls of Chester, 1100-1252: The Charter Evidence [focuses on their power to make land transactions, particularly in support of the Church].
Source: The Haskins Society Journal , 7., ( 1995):  Pages 117 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1995.

67. Record Number: 1844
Author(s): Nelson, Janet L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wary Widow [case study of the will of Erkanfrida, widow of a minor noble man and a "deo sacrata," a woman consecrated to God in her widowhood; the author includes an English translation of the will and an appendix gives the Latin text of the will from Wampach's "Urkunden- und Quellenbuch zur Geschichte der altluxemburgischen Territorien," Reprinted in Courts, Elites, and Gendered Power in the Early Middle Ages: Charlemagne and Others. By Janet L. Nelson. Ashgate Variorum, 2007. Article 2. Pages 87-90].
Source: Property and Power in the Early Middle Ages.   Edited by Wendy Davies and Paul Fouracre .   Cambridge University Press, 1995. The Haskins Society Journal , 7., ( 1995):  Pages 82 - 113. Reprinted in Courts, Elites, and Gendered Power in the Early Middle Ages: Charlemagne and Others. By Janet L. Nelson. Ashgate Variorum, 2007. Article 2.
Year of Publication: 1995.

68. Record Number: 2765
Author(s): Goez, Elke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Markgrafen von Canossa und die Klöster
Source: Deutsches Archiv , 51., ( 1995):  Pages 83 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1995.

69. Record Number: 6945
Author(s): Trexler, Richard C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Discussioni - Francis of Assisi, His Mother's Son [The author advances arguments concerning the renunciation of worldly goods by St. Francis which the author believes primarily involved the property belonging to his mother, Pica. The author responds in detail to Alessandro Barbero's criticisms of his book, "Naked Before the Father; The Renunciation of Francis of Assisi." Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Studi Medievali , 36., 1 (Giugno 1995):  Pages 363 - 374. Later published in Religion in Social Context in Europe and America, 1200-1700. By Richard C. Trexler. Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2002. Pages 171-182
Year of Publication: 1995.

70. Record Number: 438
Author(s): Howell, Martha.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewriting Marriage in Late Medieval Douai [from emphasis on the conjugal pair to the interests of the next generation].
Source: Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 307 - 337. Special issue: The Production of Knowledge: Institutionalizing Sex, Gender, and Sexualiity in Medieval Discourse. Ed. by Kathryn Gravdal.
Year of Publication: 1995.

71. Record Number: 3009
Author(s): Segura Graiño, Cristina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Participación de las Mujeres en el Poder Político
Source: Anuario de Estudios Medievales , 25., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 449 - 462.
Year of Publication: 1995.

72. Record Number: 5036
Author(s): Mineo, E. Igor.
Contributor(s):
Title : Formazione delle élites urbane nella Sicilia del tardo medioevo: Matrimonio e sistemi di successione [Sicilian customs of inheritance recognized the rights of male and female kin and granted women wide property rights; by the fourteenth century the nobility favored the paternal line, but urban inheritances frequently followed customary norms; eventually the desire to conserve patrimony led to wider imitation of feudal practices, excluding daughters from inheriting; daughters were given dowries, and only sons could share in the family inheritance].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1995):  Pages 9 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1995.

73. Record Number: 1006
Author(s): Reisinger, Roman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes Catalanes à travers leurs testaments (938-1131)
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1995):  Pages 91 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1995.

74. Record Number: 275
Author(s): Nassiet, Michel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Parenté et successions dynastiques aux 14e et 15e siècles
Source: Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 50., 3 (Mai-Juin 1995):  Pages 621 - 644.
Year of Publication: 1995.

75. Record Number: 1083
Author(s): Ó Corráin, Donnchadh.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Law in Early Ireland
Source: Chattel, Servant, or Citizen: Women's Status in Church, State, and Society.   Edited by Mary O' Dowd and Sabine Wichert .   Historical Studies 19. Papers Read Before the XXIst Irish Conference of Historians, Held at Queen's University of Belfast, 27-30 May 1993. Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen's University of Belfast, 1995. Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 50., 3 (Mai-Juin 1995):  Pages 45 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1995.

76. Record Number: 520
Author(s): Kinoshita, Sharon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Heldris de Cornüalle's "Roman de Silence" and the Feudal Politics of Lineage
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 110, 3 (May 1995): 397-409. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

77. Record Number: 266
Author(s): Betzig, Laura.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Monogamy [polygynous mating and monogamous marriage - inheritance strategies and the influence of the Church].
Source: Journal of Family History , 20., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 181 - 216.
Year of Publication: 1995.

78. Record Number: 2767
Author(s): Pohl-Resl, Brigitte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vorsorge, Memoria und soziales Ereignis: Frauen als Schenkerinnen in den bayerischen und alemannischen Urkunden des 8. und 9. Jahrhunderts
Source: Mitteilungen des Instituts für österreichische Geschichtsforschung , 103., 40241 ( 1995):  Pages 265 - 287.
Year of Publication: 1995.

79. Record Number: 1569
Author(s): Stafford, Pauline
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Norman Conquest [argues against both an Anglo-Saxon golden age for women and the view of the Norman Conquest as a major turning point for noble women's status].
Source:   Edited by Lester K. Little and Barbara H. Rosenwein Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 221 - 249. Later reprinted in Debating the Middle Ages: Issues and Readings. Edited by Lester K. Little and Barbara H. Rosenwein. Blackwell Publishers, 1998. Pages 254-263. Reprinted in Gender, Family and the Legitimation of Power: England from the Ninth to Early Tw
Year of Publication: 1994.

80. Record Number: 3346
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Women in Anglo-Saxon Art V: Matron as Ring-giver in Harley 630 [The author argues that the illumination for Psalm 130.2 shows a mother blessing her departing son and giving him an armband, symbol of the property he will inherit].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 1 (Fall 1994):  Pages 22 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1994.

81. Record Number: 1381
Author(s): Hough, Carole A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Early Kentish "Divorce Laws": A Reconsideration of Aethelberht, Chs. 79 and 80 [argues that the text traditionally taken as evidence of divorce is in fact about a widow who either remains celibate, keeping her inheritance and children, or remarries and loses her inheritance and, possibly, her children as well].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 19 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1994.

82. Record Number: 5023
Author(s): Sághy, Marianne
Contributor(s):
Title : Aspects of Female Rulership in Late Medieval Literature: The Queens' Reign in Angevin Hungary [The author examines contemporary accounts of Hungary's crisis following the death of Louis of Anjou; his daughter Mary succeeded to the throne but her mother Elizabeth made serious political errors and was executed by an aristocratic faction]
Source: East Central Europe , 20., 1 ( 1993- 1996):  Pages 69 - 86. Special issue: Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1993- 1996.

83. Record Number: 5027
Author(s): Szende, Katalin G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Other Half of the Town: Women in Private, Professional, and Public Life in Two Towns of Late Medieval Western Hungary
Source: East Central Europe , 20., 1 ( 1993- 1996):  Pages 171 - 190. Special issue title: Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1993- 1996.

84. Record Number: 11169
Author(s): Garcia Herrero, Maria del Carmen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Viudedad foral y viudas aragonesas a finales de la edad media [The author examines notarial documents concerning widows' rights to their husbands' estates. The documents date from the fifteenth century and come from Zaragoza, Huesca, Teruel, Calatayud, and Daroca in Aragon. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Hispania: Revista Española de Historia , 2 (mayo-agosto 1993):  Pages 431 - 450.
Year of Publication: 1993.

85. Record Number: 9537
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pope Innocent III and Familial Relationships of Clergy and Religious [The author draws on the letters of Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) to answer these questions: "Did Innocent permit illegitimate children, especially those of the major clergy, to receive ecclesiastical offices and benefices when they reached maturity? What was the papal position when the nuclear or extended family attempted to provide support for its children, nephews, and other kin? Did the pope intervene in any way to aid in the maintenance of these individuals?" (page 108).].
Source: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History , ( 1993):  Pages 105 - 148.
Year of Publication: 1993.

86. Record Number: 8581
Author(s): Miskimin, Harry A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Widows Not So Merry: Women and the Courts in Late Medieval France [The essay considers the practice of widows standing before the law courts to establish their economic and inheritance rights. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 207 - 219.
Year of Publication: 1992.

87. Record Number: 8735
Author(s): Kleimola, Ann M.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Accordance with the Canons of the Holy Apostles: Muscovite Dowries and Women’s Property Rights [The author argues that women’s property rights and management responsibilities through both dowries and inheritance increased during the sixteenth century but were significantly restricted in the following century. The chief concern became to allot all l
Source: Russian Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 51, 2 (April 1992): 204-229. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

88. Record Number: 9528
Author(s): Mitchell, Linda E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady is a Lord: Noble Widows and Land in Thirteenth-Century Britain [Independent noble widows were common in medieval England; many chose to remain single after the death of a husband, thereby holding large amounts of land and maintaining control over their families and their tenants. These women actively participated in the public sphere, and social class carried greater importance than gender in defining their roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 71 - 97.
Year of Publication: 1992.

89. Record Number: 10742
Author(s): Jacob, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mobilité sociale et coutumes familiales dans la France du nord et dans les Pays-Bas méridionaux [The author discusses broad trends in family strategies for marriage and inheritance. Jacob concludes that in the Low Countries conditions favored the natal family's interests over the marital couple in conserving wealth and social position. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Social Mobility in the Late Middle Ages/Marriage et mobilité sociale au bas moyen-âge. Handelingen van het colloquieum gehouden te Gent op 18 april 1988.   Edited by W. Prevenier Studia Historica Gandensia .   Department of History of the Arts Faculty of the University of Gent, 1992. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 50 - 59. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor
Year of Publication: 1992.

90. Record Number: 9184
Author(s): Vierow, Heidi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Will of Raimonda: Testament of a Woman in the Twelfth Century [The author describes a woman's will now in the library of Duke University. Raimonda, a widow who lived in Catalonia, drew up a will because she was going on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. The author includes a transcription of the Latin text of the will at the end of her article. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 214 - 224.
Year of Publication: 1992.

91. Record Number: 10741
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage, Family, and Patriarchy in Douai, 1350-1600 [The author explores the variety of documentary sources available in Douai for understanding gender differences in marriage and inheritance. Over the time span under consideration, maritalm property arrangements changed from favoring the couple to protecting the lineage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Social Mobility in the Late Middle Ages/Marriage et mobilité sociale au bas moyen-âge. Handelingen van het colloquieum gehouden te Gent op 18 april 1988.   Edited by W. Prevenier Studia Historica Gandensia .   Department of History of the Arts Faculty of the University of Gent, 1992. Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 7 - 39. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor
Year of Publication: 1992.

92. Record Number: 10745
Author(s): Danneel, Marianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Orphanhood and Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Ghent [The author examined municipal records concerning orphans in regard to inventories of goods, contested guardianship, and marriage. Orphan girls with property were especially vulnerable to ill-advised courtships and forced marriages. Both sets of natal kin were generally concerned that orphans make the best matches, so that the family patrimony would be well administered. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Social Mobility in the Late Middle Ages/Marriage et mobilité sociale au bas moyen-âge. Handelingen van het colloquieum gehouden te Gent op 18 april 1988.   Edited by W. Prevenier Studia Historica Gandensia .   Department of History of the Arts Faculty of the University of Gent, 1992. Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 123 - 139. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor
Year of Publication: 1992.

93. Record Number: 8573
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Widow's Mite: Provisions for Medieval London Widows [The author uses London plea roles and wills to examine the extent to which widows were able to recover their dowers, and suggests that widows actively participated in medieval law courts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 21 - 45.
Year of Publication: 1992.

94. Record Number: 10743
Author(s): Kock, Esther.
Contributor(s):
Title : Entry into Convents and the Position on the Marriage Market of Noble Women in the Late Middle Ages [The author explores three areas that need more investigation in order to answer the issues involved in the "Frauenfrage" (that is the dramatic upsurge of women's entry into convents and other forms of religious life in the late Middle Ages): 1)The Church's changing conception of marriage including monogamy, indissolubility, and degrees of consanguinity; 2)Economic factors including dower and hereditary position; 3)Demographic factors including sex ratios and age at marriage. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Social Mobility in the Late Middle Ages/Marriage et mobilité sociale au bas moyen-âge. Handelingen van het colloquieum gehouden te Gent op 18 april 1988.   Edited by W. Prevenier Studia Historica Gandensia .   Department of History of the Arts Faculty of the University of Gent, 1992. Manuscripta , 36., 3 (November 1992):  Pages 99 - 122. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor
Year of Publication: 1992.

95. Record Number: 11222
Author(s): Saller, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : European Family History and Roman Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 335 - 346.
Year of Publication: 1991.

96. Record Number: 11223
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The European Family and Canon Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 347 - 360.
Year of Publication: 1991.

97. Record Number: 11221
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Christianity and Endogamy
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 295 - 333.
Year of Publication: 1991.

98. Record Number: 11214
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Found a Medieval Cistercian Nunnery? [Isabel de Aubigny, Countess of Arundel, was a noble-born English woman who established a Cistercian monastery in the thirteenth century. Isabel’s husband and many close relatives died when she was young, and she chose to remain a widow. After a series of additional family deaths, Isabel used the dowry she had been given by her father upon her marriage in order to establish a Cistercian nunnery. She had many motivations for founding the monastery: religious convictions (doing charity to benefit her soul in the afterlife), economic and political goals (disposing of estates), and social aspirations and responsibilities (maintaining family honor and increasing her social prestige). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 12., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 1 - 28.
Year of Publication: 1991.

99. Record Number: 11228
Author(s): Tallan, Cheryl.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Jewish Widows: Their Control of Resources
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 63 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1991.

100. Record Number: 11224
Author(s): Bonfield, Lloyd.
Contributor(s):
Title : Canon Law and Family Law in Medieval Western Christendom
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 361 - 374.
Year of Publication: 1991.

101. Record Number: 12750
Author(s): LoPrete, Kimberly A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-Norman Card of Adela of Blois [Adela occupied a high social status and power by virtue of her royal blood (she was the daughter of William the Conqueror), her role as the Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux, and her position as the mother of Stephen, future King of England. She exerted authority as family head, accumulating land holdings and inheritance claims for the family by negotiating marriage alliances between her own family (the Thebaudians) and other powerful dynasties. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Albion , 22., 4 (Winter 1990):  Pages 567 - 589.
Year of Publication: 1990.

102. Record Number: 12698
Author(s): Turner, Ralph V.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Children of Anglo-Norman Royalty and Their Upbringing [Although royals did demonstrate affection toward their children (both legitimate and illegitimate), aristocratic parents did not consider childcare their primary responsibility. Although noblewomen participated in the education of children, they saw other roles as more important: supervising household affairs, acting as regents when their husbands were away, giving birth to heirs, and negotiating marriage alliances for their sons and daughters. Many other people (including household servants, nurses, and relatives) shared the responsibility of childrearing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 17 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1990.

103. Record Number: 12759
Author(s): Waugh, Scott L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Inheritance and the Growth of Bureaucratic Monarchy in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century England [The author documents changes in English inheritance laws as they pertain to female heirs and coheirs, showing that, by 1250, the process of partitioning inheritances had changed in such a way that administrative roles were assumed increasingly by royal officials and justices rather than lords. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 34., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1990.

104. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

105. Record Number: 11019
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Concubinage and Slavery in the Viking Age [The author argues that although not all concubines were slaves, concubinage was associated with slavery and low status. Children of both slave women and concubines needed their fathers' recognition in order to inherit. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 62., 2 (Spring 1990):  Pages 141 - 162.
Year of Publication: 1990.

106. Record Number: 28006
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Treharne, R. E., selector
Title : The Petition of the Barons, May 1258, Sections 1-6 [Reforms the magnates put forward included free entry for heirs (including daughters) with no profits taken by the bailiffs. Further they asked that the king not “disparage” women when arranging their marriages by giving them to foreign-born husbands. Later in the petition in Section 27 (pp. 88-89), the barons stipulated that a woman’s dowry upon her death without children should revert to her father or brother. In addition they wanted widows to no longer be allowed to give, sell, or enfeoff their dowries. They argued that the dowries were conditional gifts and should revert to the man who gave it or to his heirs. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Documents of the Baronial Movement of Reform and Rebellion 1258-1267.   Edited by I. J. Sanders Oxford Medieval Texts .   Clarendon Press, 1973. Albion , 22., 4 (Winter 1990):  Pages 76 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1973.

107. Record Number: 28007
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Treharne, R. E., selector
Title : The Trial of Simon de Montfort, July 1260, Sections 1-10 [This document includes clauses concerning Countess Eleanor, daughter of King John and wife of Simon de Montfort. De Montfort was a magnate and social reformer who died in battle against forces of the king. This document outlines disagreements with King Henry III, Eleanor’s brother, over Eleanor’s demands as well as her refusal to renounce claims to lands in France. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Documents of the Baronial Movement of Reform and Rebellion 1258-1267.   Edited by I. J. Sanders Oxford Medieval Texts .   Clarendon Press, 1973. Albion , 22., 4 (Winter 1990):  Pages 194 - 199.
Year of Publication: 1973.