Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


38 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 15839
Author(s): Tomas, Natalie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Women Have a Space? [The author briefly surveys the kinds of activities in which Florentine women took part. Given the gendered expectations of fathers and husbands based on religious beliefs and concerns with family honor, young and married women from privileged families mostly stayed at home. But this situation is further complicated by palaces being used for politics and business. Furthermore marriages were part of family strategies, and mothers of brides and grooms often took an active role in the considerations. Women from powerful families like Lucrezia Tornabuoni of the Medici, used their patron-client relationships to help the deserving and promote their families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006.  Pages 311 - 328.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 15838
Author(s): Ruggiero, Guido.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mean Streets, Familiar Streets, or The Fat Woodcarver and the Masculine Spaces of Renaissance Florence [The author explores issues of male friendship, honor, and sexuality in Florence through a story about a fat woodcarver who snubs his friends. They teach him a cruel lesson by convincing him that he is someone else. When they reveal the humiliating joke he is forced to leave the city. Ruggiero suggests that the origional incident may have revolved around a homosexual relationship that the other man, the architect Brunelleschi, wanted to end. All the public spaces in the story, including those that we might think private like the workshop and the home, were crucial parts of the regime that defined virtú as masculinity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006.  Pages 295 - 310.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 14136
Author(s): Eisenbichler, Konrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : At Marriage End : Girolamo Savonarola and the Question of Widows in Late Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author discusses the problems that widows encountered and considers the alternatives presented by the Dominican friar Savonarola in his "Book of the Widow's Life." His concern was that widows live in a way that was economically as well as spiritually
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.  Pages 67 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 11061
Author(s): Santi, Francesco
Contributor(s):
Title : Mariologia e cosmologia nei secoli XI e XII: Alcuni esempi [Theologians of the eleventh and twelfth centuries placed Mariology into a spiritual cosmology of creation and redemption. In the writings of theologians like Peter Damian, Honorius of Auxerre and Rupert of Deutz, Mary's role in redemption was planned before creation. The Virgin was depicted as a microcosm of the world before the fall necessitated redemption. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Figure poetiche e figure teologiche nella mariologia dei secoli XI e XII: Atti del II Convegno Mariologico della Fondazione Ezio Franceschini con la collaborazione della Biblioteca Palatina di Parma, Parma, 19-20 maggio 2000.   Edited by Clelia Maria Piastra and Francesco Santi .   SISMEL, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 71 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10855
Author(s): Huot, Sylvia
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing the Feminine in the "Roman de Perceforest": The Episode of the "Conte de la rose" [The author argues that in this episode the wife's love and loyalty are celebrated, while the knights who want to shame her husband are emasculated by her cleverness. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.  Pages 193 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 11408
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Question of Honor: Eufeme's Transgressions in "Le Roman De Silence" [The author argues that the lustful queen Eufeme does not understand the way honor operates for her husband, King Ebain, and for other male characters in the romance. Her plots to destroy Silence by appealing to her husband's threatened honor are too simplistic. Instead she brings her husband shame and must be executed by being torn apart by horses, the traditional death of traitors. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 28 - 37.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 10878
Author(s): Naessens, Mariann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Judicial Authorities' Views of Women's Roles in Late Medieval Flanders [The author examines court records concerning various sexual crimes including adultery, brothel keeping, and cross dressing. The judges appear to be most concerned with men's honor as preserved through women's fidelity and subordination. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 51 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 9502
Author(s): Horodowich, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beyond Marriage and the Convent: Women, Class, and Honour in Renaissance Italy [Among the books discussed in this review essay are two medieval titles: Ann Crabb's "The Strozzi of Florence: Widowhood and Family Solidarity in the Renaissance" and Stanley Chojnacki's "Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 340 - 345.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 7832
Author(s): Nirenberg, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conversion, Sex, and Segregation: Jews and Christians in Medieval Spain
Source: American Historical Review , 107., 4 (October 2002):  Pages 1065 - 1093.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 8805
Author(s): Lansing, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Girls in Trouble in Late Medieval Bologna [The author draws evidence of teenaged girls from thirteenth century legal testimony. These cases involved concubines, kidnappings, pregnancies, and neglected girls without marriage prospects. Though the court tended to view these girls as victims, some evidence suggests they were frequently independent and even rebellious. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. American Historical Review , 107., 4 (October 2002):  Pages 293 - 309.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 8441
Author(s): Gradowicz-Pancer, Nira.
Contributor(s):
Title : De-gendering Female Violence: Merovingian Female Honour as an "Exchange of Violence"
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 11., 1 ( 2002):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 9359
Author(s): Mladjov, Ian S. R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Case of Iusta Grata Honoria and Imperial Women in Late Antiquity
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 28., ( 2002):  Pages 25 - 27.
Year of Publication: 2002.

13. Record Number: 8547
Author(s): Marino, Nancy F.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Portuguese "Damas" Scandalized the Court of Enrique IV of Castile [The young women who accompanied the Portuguese princess Juana to the Castilian court caused a great stir. They dressed provocatively, were sexually aggressive, and sometimes wore men's clothing and carried weapons. Several of them became the mistresses of powerful men in the kingdom. When the advisors to Isabella I, la Catolica, Enrique's successor, wished to discredit the king, they used the Portuguese "damas" as another instance of his immorality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 43-52 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 5774
Author(s): Bryce, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing for Strangers: Women, Dance, and Music in Quattrocento Florence
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 4.1 (Winter 2001): 1074-1107. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 5720
Author(s): Woods-Marsden, Joanna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of the Lady, 1430- 1520 [the author traces the development of the patrician female ideal; portrait forms evolved very rapidly from the profile that suggested self-control and inaccessibility to the intimate frontal pose; the author argues that the change was due in part to the influence of humanism with its emphasis on the individual and subjectivity].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 62 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 6927
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Theories of Education in Fifteenth-Century Conduct Books [The author compares texts written for boys and girls and argues that medieval ideas about gender affected both content and teaching methods. Boys learned visually, could handle abstract ideas, and did not need examples of violence to ensure obedience, while girls learned by listening, could only understand the concrete, and had to be threatened with corporal punishment regularly to preserve their sexual purity and by extension the family's honor. The texts the author analyzes are: For girls: "The Good Wife Taught Her Daughter" "The Good Wyfe Wold a Pylgremage" "The Book of the Knight of the Tower" For boys: "The Babees Book" "Lerne or Be Lewde" "The ABC of Aristotle" "Urbanitatis" "The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil Boke" "The Young Children's Book" "Stans puer ad mensam" "How the Wise Man Taught His Son" "The Boke of Curtasye" "Symon's Lesson of Wysedome for All Maner Chyldryn." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001.  Pages 135 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2001.

17. Record Number: 5783
Author(s): Skinner, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Memory in Medieval Italy [the author provides a brief overview of male and female figures cited in chronicles; she then moves on to consider how the reputation of women rulers could be easily tarnished and concludes with the connections between memory and women in the family and in hagiography].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001.  Pages 36 - 52.
Year of Publication: 2001.

18. Record Number: 6925
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Miroir des bonnes Femmes": Not for Women Only? ["To read the 'Miroir des bonnes femmes' as relating only to women, therefore, would be to misunderstand its role in the formation of new ideologies during the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. The conjunction of female-based rhetoric, familial identities, and the promise of social advancement through proper conduct marks the first stage of a distinctive bourgeois ideology that will be fully articulated and culturally dominant by the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Despite the assumption, perhaps, on the part of conduct book owners that they are justifying a claim to 'noble' rank, it is in bourgeois culture that female honor is made the symbolic basis of a family's social reputation. As they cultivated that reputation and fostered a process of social advancement, fathers as well as their daughters therefore had a vital interest in owning conduct texts addressed to women." p. 102].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001.  Pages 86 - 105.
Year of Publication: 2001.

19. Record Number: 10113
Author(s): Wickham-Crowley, Kelley M
Contributor(s):
Title : Buried Truth: Shrouds and Female Production
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Eighteenth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 3658
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Loved Him - Hated Her: Honor and Shame at the Medieval Court [The author argues that the queen had the responsibility to uphold the king's honor; includes brief case studies of Margaret of Provence and Louis IX and her sister Eleanor of Provence and Henry III].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Art History , 22., 5 (December 1999):  Pages 279 - 298.
Year of Publication: 1999.

21. Record Number: 4320
Author(s): Rasmussen, Ann Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Little-known Medieval Texts. Good Counsel for a Young Lady: A Low German Mother-Daughter Conduct Poem [the mother advises her daughter to be modest, obedient to her husband, and kind to her servants; it presupposes an urban setting among the middle class in a household workshop].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 28., (Fall 1999):  Pages 28 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 4001
Author(s): Bestor, Jane Fair.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Transactions in Renaissance Italy and Mauss's "Essay on the Gift" [The author focuses on the gifts that the groom gave the bride including jewelry, ornaments, and rich clothing; by the fifteenth century grooms retained use over these expensive items and often rented them out or sold them.]
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 164 (August 1999): 6-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 5030
Author(s): Clifton, James,
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Shame in Masaccio's "Expulsion from the Garden of Eden" ["Here both gestures - Eve in covering her erogenous zones, Adam in leaving his exposed and in covering only his face - suggest that, in conformity with Italian mores, it is only the woman's sexuality that is at issue and that the sin associated with her sexuality dishonours the man. Adam's exposure does not dishonour him; rather it serves to draw the insistent distinction between men and women, fundamental to the honour-shame paradigm, which is manifested most recognizably in anatomy." (Page 650)].
Source: Art History , 22., 5 (December 1999):  Pages 637 - 655.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 5238
Author(s): Englade, Emilio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Straw for Youre Gentillesse: Masculine Identity, Honor, and Dorigen
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 5., ( 1998):  Pages 34 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1998.

25. Record Number: 5582
Author(s): Valori, Alessandro.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Onore femminile attraverso l'epistolario di Margherita e Francesco Datini da Prato [Francesco Datini, a merchant of Prato, has left us many letters detailing his business dealings and his anxieties; one goal was to return from doing business abroad to his wife and his household; to this end he married a much younger woman, Margherita Bandini; Francesco shared the common assumptions of his day and class about women needing male tutelage and marriages creating alliances between families, as well as the importance of dowries; Datini's ideas of honor, applied to his wife and his illegitimate daughter, are based on submission and service to the family; Margherita too internalized these values, even though she was childless].
Source: Giornale Storico della Letteratura Italiana , 175., ( 1998):  Pages 53 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1998.

26. Record Number: 2971
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and the Rites of Honour in Italian Renaissance Cities [ritual activity examined includes marriages, confraternities, mock battles and insults].
Source: Gender and Society in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Judith C. Brown and Robert C. Davis .   Longman, 1998. Art History , 22., 5 (December 1999):  Pages 39 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1998.

27. Record Number: 1340
Author(s): Parry, Joseph D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dorigen, Narration, and Coming Home in the "Franklin's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 262 - 293.
Year of Publication: 1996.

28. Record Number: 84
Author(s): Groebner, Valentin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Losing Face, Saving Face: Noses and Honour in the Late Medieval Town [cutting off women's noses as a mark of sexual shame].
Source: History Workshop Journal , 40., 0 (Autumn 1995):  Pages 1 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 16756
Author(s): Bianco, Marinella
Contributor(s):
Title : Le classificazioni femminili nella mentalitá medievale (sec. XII-XVI) [Legal texts can cast light on medieval attempts to impose classifications on women. Local laws in Piedmont distinguished between adultery and non-marital sex, as well as between consensual and non-consensual relations. Laws in Piedmont dealt not just with the classification of sexual offenses but with issues of familial honor. Other categorizations were constructed, but Piedmontese laws looked at how a woman fit into social structures. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Nuova Rivista Storica , 79., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 261 - 274.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 3008
Author(s): Graña Cid, Maria del Mar and Ángela Muõz Fernández
Contributor(s):
Title : Mujeres y no ciudadanía. La relación de las mujeres con los espacios públicos en el bajo medievo castellano
Source: Arenal: Revista de Historia de las Mujeres , 2., 1 (January-June 1995):  Pages 41 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 20797
Author(s): Pallarés Méndez, Maria del Carmen
Contributor(s):
Title : Concienca y resistencia: la denuncia de la agresión masculina en la Galicia del siglo XV
Source: Arenal: Revista de Historia de las Mujeres , 2., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 67 - 79.
Year of Publication: 1995.

32. Record Number: 232
Author(s): Wiesner-Hanks, Merry.
Contributor(s):
Title : Learned Task and Given to Men Alone: The Gendering of Tasks in Early Modern German Cities [division between production and reproduction].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 89 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1995.

33. Record Number: 2808
Author(s): Mundal, Else.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Position of Women in Old Norse Society and the Basis for Their Power [author emphasizes the goading women in sagas who spur on the hero; the author suggests that women's power lay in being judges of men's honor].
Source: Nora: Nordic Journal of Women's Studies , 2., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 3 - 11.
Year of Publication: 1994.

34. Record Number: 9459
Author(s): Grimbert, Joan Tasker.
Contributor(s):
Title : Love, Honor, and Alienation in Thomas’s "Roman de Tristan" [In his poem, Thomas portrays the two doomed lovers Tristan and Iseult as figures who suffer deep social alienation when separated from family and homeland. Through these figures, the poet illustrates the eternal conflict between an impulse toward social collectivity and the desire for individuality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Arthurian Yearbook , 2., ( 1992):  Pages 77 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 6681
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Un Salario o l'onore: come valutare le donne Fiorentine del XIV- XV secolo [in Renaissance Italy, a married woman's honor was incompatible with such public functions as gainful employment; an unmarried woman or a widow was more likely to seek employment, although a married woman might make thread or cloth at home; the married woman's economic identity was supposed to be submerged in that of her husband].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1992):  Pages 41 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 13054
Author(s): Germain, Ellen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lunete, Women, and Power in Chrétien's "Yvain" [One of the Curtain Talk given before performances of "The Lark." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Quarterly , 38., 1 (February 1991):  Pages 15 - 25.
Year of Publication: 1991.

37. Record Number: 5026
Author(s): Römer, Zdenka Janekovic.
Contributor(s):
Title : Noble Women in Fifteenth-Century Ragusa [the author gives a brief overview of many of the factors in noble women's lives, including sources, marital strategies, desired female virtues, children, dowry and inheritance, family structure, legal rights, religious life, life in a noble household, education and entertainment, clothing, commerce, and politics; the Appendix lists archival sources consulted by the author in Dubrovnik].
Source: East Central Europe , 1 ( 1991):  Pages 141 - 170. Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1991.

38. Record Number: 36214
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Personified figures of Humility and Pride from Somme le roi
Source: Romance Quarterly , 38., 1 (February 1991):
Year of Publication: