Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


24 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 36545
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Être enfant au Moyen Âge
Source: Être enfant au Moyen Âge: Anthologie de textes consacrés à la vie de l'enfant du Ve au XVe siècle.   Edited by Pierre Riché .   Editions Fabert, 2010.  Pages 14 - 209.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 14121
Author(s): Lorentz, Philippe.
Contributor(s):
Title : Children's Portraits: Between Politics and Family Memories [The author briefly surveys portraits done in the late medieval period, looking most closely at paintings of Margaret of Austria. In some cases the portraits were made to be sent to potential husbands in marriage negotiations. Title note supplied by Femin
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005.  Pages 114 - 123.
Year of Publication: 2005.

3. Record Number: 13632
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Putting on the Girls: Mary's Girlhood and the Performance of Monarchical Authority in Philippe de Mézières's Dramatic Office for the "Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple" [The author finds a connection between the presentation of Mary's feminine virtues and French royal authority. The play, written by courtier Philippe de Mézières, called for a young girl of three or four to portray Mary. Udry draws parallels with conduct literature to argue that Mary's feminine qualities would have been a model not only for men and women but also for the king of France. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: European Medieval Drama , 8., ( 2004):  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 14092
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Desiring Virgins: Maidens, Martyrs, and Femininity in Late Medieval England [The author explores the attractions of virgin martyr stories for young women in the audience. Phillips suggests that the treatment of sexual themes in these stories should be described as "parasexual" (borrowed from studies of Victorian bar maids), cases in which sexuality is acknowledged but is controlled. At the same time the young virgin martyrs are presented as beautiful, glamorous, and dressed in fashionable clothing; all of this was of prime interest to the young women in the audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Youth in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. J. P. Goldberg and Felicity Riddy .   York Medieval Press in association with the Boydell Press, 2004. European Medieval Drama , 8., ( 2004):  Pages 45 - 59.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10963
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Taken into Custody: Girls and Convent Guardianship in Renaissance Florence
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 177 - 200.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 8806
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Aristocratic Teenaged Female: Adolescent or Adult? [The author argues that there was a more "fluid scale of ages" for women than for men, particularly involving royalty and the nobility. Young women could act decisively and authoritatively when helping their husbands or protecting their children. Parsons points to the case of Isabelle of Hainaut who at fourteen performed a dramatic public prayer to win public support and prevent her husband's planned divorce. Elizabeth Plantagenet, Countess of Holland, at fiften years enlisted the help of the Hague's burgers to rescue her young husband who had been kidnapped by the regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 311 - 321.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 8805
Author(s): Lansing, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Girls in Trouble in Late Medieval Bologna [The author draws evidence of teenaged girls from thirteenth century legal testimony. These cases involved concubines, kidnappings, pregnancies, and neglected girls without marriage prospects. Though the court tended to view these girls as victims, some evidence suggests they were frequently independent and even rebellious. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 293 - 309.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 5891
Author(s): Hennessy, Cecily Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Child Bride and Her Representation [The author examines Vatican Ms. gr. 1851 which contains the partial text of a poem with illustrations concerning the reception of a foreign child bride by a Byzantine emperor and his two children, the bridegroom son and his young princess sister].
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 27., ( 2001):  Pages 53
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 5998
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Women in France and England, 1050- 1300
Source: Journal of Women's History (Full Text via Project Muse) 12, 4 (Winter 2001): 22-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 6746
Author(s): Seidel Menchi, Silvana.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Girl and the Hourglass: Periodization of Women's Lives in Western Preindustrial Societies [The author examines various models that were used to indicate the significant ages in men's and women's lives; in the latter half of the article, the author concentrates on medieval Italian child brides, using case studies, prescriptive literature, and l
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 41 - 74.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 6927
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Theories of Education in Fifteenth-Century Conduct Books [The author compares texts written for boys and girls and argues that medieval ideas about gender affected both content and teaching methods. Boys learned visually, could handle abstract ideas, and did not need examples of violence to ensure obedience, while girls learned by listening, could only understand the concrete, and had to be threatened with corporal punishment regularly to preserve their sexual purity and by extension the family's honor. The texts the author analyzes are: For girls: "The Good Wife Taught Her Daughter" "The Good Wyfe Wold a Pylgremage" "The Book of the Knight of the Tower" For boys: "The Babees Book" "Lerne or Be Lewde" "The ABC of Aristotle" "Urbanitatis" "The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil Boke" "The Young Children's Book" "Stans puer ad mensam" "How the Wise Man Taught His Son" "The Boke of Curtasye" "Symon's Lesson of Wysedome for All Maner Chyldryn." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001.  Pages 135 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 4835
Author(s): Wasyliw, Patricia Healy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Pious Infant: Developments in Popular Piety During the High Middle Ages [the author argues that during this period children became saints in two ways: 1) Pious behavior and 2) Murder victims upon whose short lives some elements of sanctity were superimposed; the author discusses the lives of several girls around whom cults developed including Rose of Viterbo, Imelda Lambertini, Saint Fina of San Gimignano, Contessa or Comitissa Teleapetra, Agnes of Bavaria, Reinildis of Reisenbeck, and Panacea of Novara].
Source: Lay Sanctity, Medieval and Modern: A Search for Models.   Edited by Ann W. Astell .   University of Notre Dame Press, 2000.  Pages 105 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4022
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maidenhood as the Perfect Age of Woman's Life [The author explores the idea of what was the ideal age for women, drawing evidence from the "Pearl," stories of the virgin martyrs, and representations of the Virgin Mary during the Assumption and the Coronation].
Source: Young Medieval Women.   Edited by Katherine J. Lewis, Noel James Menuge, and Kim M. Phillips .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 4408
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Whose Story Was This? Rape Narratives in Medieval English Courts [the author argues that for female victims, rape prosecutions were seldom successful and often resulted in fines and imprisonment for the rape victim; Hanawalt examines in detail the case of eleven-year-old Joan who allegedly was raped by a merchant from Bordeaux].
Source: Of Good and Ill Repute: Gender and Social Control in Medieval England. Barbara A. Hanawalt .   Oxford University Press, 1998.  Pages 124 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 2733
Author(s): Hough, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Reading of Alfred, ch. 26 [it concerns compensation for the rape of underage girls which the author suggests was the same as that owed for raping women who were past child-bearing age].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 1997.

16. Record Number: 6014
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes et la mort à la fin du moyen age [the author provides an overview of female mortality based on statistics taken from Florentine ricordanze (which often included family memoirs) for both girls and married women; the author notes the discrepancy in female versus male survival rates with men living in significantly larger proportions from childhood onward; the author also notes the higher mortality rates for women due to death during childbirth].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995. History Today , 45., 6 (June 1995):  Pages 207 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1995.

17. Record Number: 1094
Author(s): Giladi, Avner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Differences in Child Rearing and Education: Some Preliminary Observations with Reference to Medieval Muslim Thought [contrasts religious writings that offer women some protections and a measure of equality with such social customs as childhood rites, child marriage, and reactions to children's deaths, all cases in which the male was favored over the female].
Source: Al-Qantara , 16., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 291 - 308.
Year of Publication: 1995.

18. Record Number: 331
Author(s): Schultz, James A.
Contributor(s):
Title : No Girls, No Boys, No Families: On the Construction of Childhood in Texts of the German Middle Ages
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 94., 1 (Jan. 1995):  Pages 59 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1995.

19. Record Number: 1679
Author(s): Winter, Johanna Maria van.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Education of the Daughters of the Nobility in the Ottonian Empire
Source: The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Turn of the First Millennium.   Edited by Adelbert Davids .   Cambridge University Press, 1995. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 94., 1 (Jan. 1995):  Pages 86 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1995.

20. Record Number: 478
Author(s): Goldberg, Jeremy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Girls Growing Up in Later Medieval England
Source: History Today , 45., 6 (June 1995):  Pages 25 - 32.
Year of Publication: 1995.

21. Record Number: 10280
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Historical Descriptions and Prescriptions for Adolescence [The author considers the concept of adolescence, with a focus on female adolescence, as it was recognized and defined from the Middle Ages to the present. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Family History , 17., 4 ( 1992):  Pages 341 - 351.
Year of Publication: 1992.

22. Record Number: 11226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Parallels in the Education of Medieval Jewish Women and Christian Women [An abstract precedes this essay in the journal.]
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 41 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1991.

23. Record Number: 12731
Author(s): Giladi, Avner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Observations on Infanticide in Medieval Muslim Society [Infanticide was a recognized practice in Arabia before the emergence of Islam, and although Muhammed denounced the practice in the Qu'ran, evidence from Qu'anic commentaries and hadith literature indicate that it persisted (even in post-Islamic Arabia) as a family planning strategy. For instance, a family under extreme economic pressure might allow an infant (especially a girl) to die soon after birth. Although Arab polytheists may have willingly sacrificed children (especially males, who were deemed most precious), Muslims viewed boys and girls as equals and on the whole rejected infanticide. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: International Journal of Middle East Studies , 22., 2 (May 1990):  Pages 185 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1990.

24. Record Number: 40518
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Girl from Frankfurt Cathedral
Source: International Journal of Middle East Studies , 22., 2 (May 1990):
Year of Publication: