Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


25 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 33538
Author(s): Pearson, Andrea G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Subject, Gendered Spectator: Mary Magdalen in the Gaze of Margaret of York
Source: Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 47 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2005.

2. Record Number: 20700
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing the New Middle Ages [Contemporary medieval studies attempts to escape the traps of regarding the Middle Ages as either entirely "other" or simply "modern." Nichols reviews the contributions of five recent authors: Jody Enders, Suzannah Biernoff, Jeffrey Hamburger, R. Howard Bloch, and Daniel Heller-Roazen. All have made advances by refusing to adhere to the fixed boundaries drawn by previous scholarship. Of particular interest are works by Hamburger, discussing the agency nuns attained even when cloistered, and Bloch, describing the role of Marie de France in creating vernacular literature. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 422 - 441.
Year of Publication: 2005.

3. Record Number: 11751
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rips and Slits: The Torn Garment and the Medieval Self [A fashion for garments with slits, tears, or perforations originated in the 12th century and flourished after 1340. Some slits were intended to reveal undergarments or flesh, exposing them to the gaze of others. This erotic element inspired sumptuary laws and denunciations. Medieval literature also reveals a close relationship between the terms for these slits and violence, as in dagging and daggers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Clothing Culture, 1350-1650.   Edited by Catherine Richardson .   Ashgate, 2004. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 10849
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Look of Love: The Gender of the Gaze in Troubadour Lyric
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 79 - 95.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10746
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gothic Mirror and the Female Gaze [The author explores the representations of couple on carved ivory mirror cases. Smith argues that in the majority of cases, the depicted female gaze is responsive to that of men with the male lover taking an active role. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 73 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 10459
Author(s): Prendergast, Thomas A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Invisible Spouse: Henry VI, Arthur, and the Fifteenth-Century Subject [The author examines two narratives concerned with sovereignty and the queen's body: "Collectarium mansuetudinum et bonorum morum regis Henrici VI" by John Blacman, Henry VI's spiritual director, and Malory's "Morte Darthur." In both texts the threat to the king lies in the queen's body. Her sexual and political powers call the king's authority and his relationship with his subjects into question. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 305-326. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 6617
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Renaissance Household Goddesses: Fertility, Politics, and the Gendering of the Spectatorship [the author argues that these terracotta statuettes of Dovizia (a woman with a basket of fruit on her head who is leading a little boy), based on Donatello's statue now lost, can be read both as an embodiment of wealth and fertility and as a political, public symbol of the city and reminder of the pre-Medicean era; the author explores the implications of both female and male spectatorship].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 163 - 189.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 6212
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The look of love: the gender of the gaze in troubadour lyric
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 8803
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Knights under the Feminine Gaze ["The women served a ratifying function for a youth's entry into a masculine hierarchy of knightly prestige, but they did not themselves choose the criteria by which they evaluated men. A woman's gaze at a young knight was not a sign of her activity as opposed to his passivity, but rather the sign that she was the prize he was to win, the currency in which his worth in other men's eyes was to be measured." Page 203.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 189 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 4595
Author(s): Miller, Mara.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady in the Garden: Subjects and Objects in an Ideal World [The author contrasts Japanse pictures of women in gardens (women authors, women writing, and women characters from women's writings) with those of medieval Europe in which women do not write in gardens].
Source: Crossing the Bridge: Comparative Essays on Medieval European and Heian Japanese Women Writers.   Edited by Barbara Stevenson and Cynthia Ho .   Palgrave, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 189 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 4812
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Walls, Windows, and Doors: The Politics of Gesture in Late Fifteenth-Century English Books for Women [the author analyzes three romances in manuscript, a printed romance, and the courtesy text, "Book of the Knight of the Tower"; she argues that the manuscript texts are more concerned with social status than the policing of relations between women and men and harken back to the glory days of courtly life, while the printed texts appeal to a wider audience, especially the bourgeois, and concentrate on sexual respectability].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 185 - 198.
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 10123
Author(s): Peach, Bridget.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Suppression of the Powerful, Avenging Woman in "Beowulf": Beowulf's Encounter with Grendel's Mother
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 347: "Beowulf I."
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4273
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Paradox of Virginity within the Anchoritic Tradition: The Masculine Gaze and the Feminine Body in the "Wohunge" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 5588
Author(s): Weston, L. M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Without Sexuality: Hrotsvitha's Imagining of a Chaste Female Community
Source: The community, the family, and the saint: patterns of power in early medieval Europe: selected proceedings of the International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 4-7 July 1994, 10-13 July 1995.   Edited by Joyce Hill and Mary Swan International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 1998. Art History , 21., 4 (December 1998):  Pages 127 - 142.
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 3056
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Under the Gaze: A Renaissance Genealogy
Source: Art History , 21., 4 (December 1998):  Pages 565 - 590.
Year of Publication: 1998.

16. Record Number: 3667
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Regarding Women in Sacred Space [the author discusses the separation of women from men at public sermons and in church; religious writers warned women to keep their minds on God and their gaze lowered because their sexuality was a danger for all men especially the celibate; poets considered Church the place for romantic meetings because a shared gaze signaled sexual choice].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Art History , 21., 4 (December 1998):  Pages 17 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 2908
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : To See and to Know...: Female Gazing in Julian of Norwich's "Showings"
Source: Magistra , 3., 1 (Summer 1997):  Pages 3 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1997.

18. Record Number: 1785
Author(s): Ross, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Resisting Rivalry: The Female Gaze of Desire in "Eliduc" [International Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, May 1996].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 24
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 1563
Author(s): Brumbaugh- Walter, Lynnea.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Grace of That Mutual Glance: Reciprocal Gazing and Unholy Voyeurism in "The Life of Christina of Markyate" [analyzes the nurturing, mutual gazes Christina shares with her rescuer, the hermit Roger, and the Virgin Mary ; these gazes are contrasted with the public voyeuristic gazes that Christina's Mother Beatrix arranges to destroy her daughter's chastity]
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 11., ( 1996):  Pages 74 - 95. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 11808
Author(s): Sterba, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Question of Enite’s Transgression: Female Voice and Male Gaze as Determining Factors in Hatmann’s Erec [The author argues that by re-inscribing the Echo and Narcissus myth in the story of Erec and Enite, Hartmann von Aue effectively advises women to listen to their inner voices, and advises men to turn their gazes outward from themselves. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women as Protagonists and Poets in the German Middle Ages: An Anthology of Feminist Approaches to Middle High German Literature.   Edited by Albrecht Classen .   Kümmerle Verlag, 1991. Medieval Perspectives , 11., ( 1996):  Pages 57 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1991.

21. Record Number: 11772
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Before the Male Gaze: The Absence of the Female Body in Old Norse [The essay studies Old Norse descriptions of corporeal beauty, focusing in particular on the role of clothing and hair. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Sex in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Joyce E. Salisbury .   Garland Publishing, 1991. Medieval Perspectives , 11., ( 1996):  Pages 3 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

22. Record Number: 11077
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin’s Gaze: Spectacle and Transgression in Middle English Lyrics of the Passion [The article shows that the Virgin's dual role as spectacle and spectator in Middle English Passion lyrics transgresses cultural proscriptions of female gazing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 106, 5 (May 1991): 1083-1093. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

23. Record Number: 11220
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Voyeur and the Private Life in "Troilus and Criseyde."
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 13., ( 1991):  Pages 141 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1991.

24. Record Number: 13261
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Image and Ideology: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Drama and Narrative [The cult of Saint Anne offered a means of performing meaning(s). The Huy Nativity Play has Anne and other kin visit Mary and the infant Jesus, gazing adoringly at the baby as he gazes back. In the N-Town Mary Play, Anne is the lynchpin of the Holy Kinship, mediating between marriage and ideas of chastity. The Digby Candelmas Play was enacted on Saint Anne's Day. It shows role reversal, including a soldier being beaten with spindles for his role in the Massacre of the Innocents. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Interpreting Cultural Symbols: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Society.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Pamela Sheingorn .   The University of Georgia Press, 1990. Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 13., ( 1991):  Pages 111 - 130.
Year of Publication: 1990.

25. Record Number: 32506
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Melusine in her bath, spied upon by her husband Raymondin
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 13., ( 1991):
Year of Publication: