Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


93 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 32334
Author(s): Long, Jane C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dangerous Women: Observations on the Feast of Herod in Florentine Art of the Early Renaissance
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 66., 4 ( 2013):  Pages 1153 - 1205.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 38478
Author(s): [no author]
Contributor(s):
Title : La Prammatica sulle vesti delle donne fiorentine (Firenze 1343-1345)
Source: Draghi rossi e querce azzurre: elenchi descrittivi di abiti di lusso (Firenze 1343-1345).   Edited by Laurence Gérard-Marchant .   SISMEL, 2013. Renaissance Quarterly , 66., 4 ( 2013):  Pages 1 - 516.
Year of Publication: 2013.

3. Record Number: 32413
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Antoninus of Florence and the Dominican Witch Theorists
Source: Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 347 - 361.
Year of Publication: 2012.

4. Record Number: 22417
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Failed Censures: Ecclesiastical Regulation of Women’s Clothing in Late Medieval Italy [Ecclesiastical efforts to regulate vanity of dress were few in late medieval Italy. Most significant was a constitution written by Cardinal Latino Malabranca intended to limit display of flesh and waste of cloth. By the fourteenth century compromises were being made in the enforcement of this decree, and new issues involving the wearing of jewelry and other ornaments were being addressed. By the fifteenth century, sumptuary legislation was largely left to the Italian communes, although some of the clergy still advocated strict measures against vain dress and ornamentation. The appendices include: Appendix 3.1 Cardinal Latino Malabranca's Constitution on Women's dress (1279); Appendix 3.2 Cardinal Bertrand du Poujet's Modification of Cardinal Latino's Constitution (ca. 1327) ; Appendix 3.3 The Constitution of Antonio d'Orso Biliotti, Bishop of Florence (ca. 1310). Title note submitted by the author.]
Source:   Edited by Robin Netherton; Gale R. Owen-Crocker Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 37 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2009.

5. Record Number: 19219
Author(s): Leone, Stephanie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Vogue in Fifteenth-Century Florence: The Material Culture of Marriage [In this short, introductory essay for an art exhibit, the author surveys the meaning of the sumptuously painted wedding chest ("cassone") given by the groom and used to transport the bride's trousseau. The rich iconography of specific "cassoni" is discussed including the Meeting of Esther. Title Note Supplied by Feminae].
Source: Secular Sacred: 11th-16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.   Edited by Nancy Netzer .   McMullen Museum of Art, 2006. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 81 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 15839
Author(s): Tomas, Natalie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Women Have a Space? [The author briefly surveys the kinds of activities in which Florentine women took part. Given the gendered expectations of fathers and husbands based on religious beliefs and concerns with family honor, young and married women from privileged families mostly stayed at home. But this situation is further complicated by palaces being used for politics and business. Furthermore marriages were part of family strategies, and mothers of brides and grooms often took an active role in the considerations. Women from powerful families like Lucrezia Tornabuoni of the Medici, used their patron-client relationships to help the deserving and promote their families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 311 - 328.
Year of Publication: 2006.

7. Record Number: 15840
Author(s): Weddle, Saundra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Identity and Alliance: Urban Presence, Spatial Privilege, and Florentine Renaissance Convents [The author analyses the locations and functions of women's monasteries in late medieval and early modern Florence. Weddle argues that architectural spaces carried multiple meanings. Womens' monasteries were places of spiritual work, but they also could convey meanings related to patronage and politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 394 - 412.
Year of Publication: 2006.

8. Record Number: 11759
Author(s): Hayum, Andrée
Contributor(s):
Title : A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 243 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

9. Record Number: 16303
Author(s): Niles, John D
Contributor(s):
Title : Why the Bishop of Florence Had to Get Married [The author analyzes the "adventus" ceremony in Florence when a new bishop took possession of his see. The ceremony included a ritual marriage with the abbess of San Pier Maggiore monastery. Miller argues that the bishop's outsider status and role as head of a lineage needed the connection with a highly placed abbess to symbolize his alliance with the city's most important political families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 1055 - 1091.
Year of Publication: 2006.

10. Record Number: 15838
Author(s): Ruggiero, Guido.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mean Streets, Familiar Streets, or The Fat Woodcarver and the Masculine Spaces of Renaissance Florence [The author explores issues of male friendship, honor, and sexuality in Florence through a story about a fat woodcarver who snubs his friends. They teach him a cruel lesson by convincing him that he is someone else. When they reveal the humiliating joke he is forced to leave the city. Ruggiero suggests that the origional incident may have revolved around a homosexual relationship that the other man, the architect Brunelleschi, wanted to end. All the public spaces in the story, including those that we might think private like the workshop and the home, were crucial parts of the regime that defined virtú as masculinity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 295 - 310.
Year of Publication: 2006.

11. Record Number: 18171
Author(s): Simons, Patricia
Contributor(s):
Title : Separating the Men from the Boys: Masculinites in Early Quattrocento Florence and Donatello's "Saint George" [Nineteenth and twentieth century scholars projected an idealized masculinity onto Renaissance Florence. Seen from this viewpoint, Donatello's "Saint George" is an idealized young man just entering maturity. The supposed display of manly self control fits in with ideals of masculinity described by humanists like Leonardo Bruni. This, however, involves rejecting alternative evidence showing how homoerotic desire and nostalgia for lost youth were projected onto the same image by some Florentines. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Rituals, Images, and Words: Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by F. W. Kent and Charles Zika Late Medieval Early Modern Studies .   Brepols, 2005. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 147 - 176.
Year of Publication: 2005.

12. Record Number: 20357
Author(s): Fabbri, Lorenzo
Contributor(s):
Title : I carteggi familiari degli Strozzi e il tema del matrimonio: un'esperienza di ricerca [Private papers like those of the Strozzi family cast light on marriage negotiations in fifteenth century Florence. The letters of Alessandra Strozzi and Marco Pareti, her brother-in-law, reveal personal qualities sought in the brides for her sons, as well as practical issues like dowry. The character and appearance of the prospective bride were as important as the size of her dowry. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome. Moyen âge , 117., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 2005.

13. Record Number: 11758
Author(s): Heller, Ena Giurescu.
Contributor(s):
Title : Access to Salvation: The Place (and Space) of Women Patrons in Fourteenth-century Florence [The author provides a case study of Monna Andrea Acciaiuoli's patronage of her husband's family chapel in Santa Maria Novella. She commissioned the glass windows and the altarpiece. Heller raises the question of whether Monna Andrea and other female patrons had access to these family chapels beyond the rood screen. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 161 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2005.

14. Record Number: 14136
Author(s): Eisenbichler, Konrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : At Marriage End : Girolamo Savonarola and the Question of Widows in Late Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author discusses the problems that widows encountered and considers the alternatives presented by the Dominican friar Savonarola in his "Book of the Widow's Life." His concern was that widows live in a way that was economically as well as spiritually
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 67 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2005.

15. Record Number: 11661
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Origins of the "De ornatu mulierum" of Antoninus of Florence [The author highlights the significance of a legal text on excess in clothing. Franciscan observants had petitioned the pope for an opinion, and he had charged a committe to respond. (Two versions of the report written in Latin are presented as appendices to the article.) The expert committee included Antoninus, archbishop of Florence, and his text, "De ornatu mulierum," Izbicki demonstrates, was originally written to accompany their opinion. In general the committe sought a moderate path and urged respect for individual cities' customs in dress. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLN: Modern Language Notes (Full Text via Project Muse) 119, 1 (January 2004): 142-161. Supplement. Studia Humanitatis: Essays in Honor of Salvatore Camporeale. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 12879
Author(s): Marchand, Eckart.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monastic "Imitatio Christi": Andrea del Castagno's "Cenacolo di S. Apollonia"
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 47., ( 2003):  Pages 31 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2003.

17. Record Number: 14642
Author(s): Tylus, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Charitable Women: Hans Baron's Civic Renaissance Revisited [Hans Baron's idea of the active life focused exclusively on civic politics, leaving little room for the roles of women. A wider view, encompassing social phenomena, leaves room for their participation in Renaissance Florence. Costanza, a figure in Lorenzo Medici's play for the feast of Saints John and Paul, is treated as a figure of the "mixed" life, combining devotion with a willingness to marry for the good of the Roman empire. Florentine women like Lucrezia Tornabuoni, Lorenzo's mother, led such a life of devotion and service. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rinascimento , 43., ( 2003):  Pages 287 - 307.
Year of Publication: 2003.

18. Record Number: 9651
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Family Solidarity in Exile and in Law: Alberti Lawsuits of the Early Quattrocento [The author examines two legal cases brought by the Alberti family in the early fifteenth century. Various members of the family were exiled from Florence for plotting against the government. In some cases Alberti wives were left in Florence to manage wha
Source: Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 421 - 439.
Year of Publication: 2003.

19. Record Number: 10963
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Taken into Custody: Girls and Convent Guardianship in Renaissance Florence
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 177 - 200.
Year of Publication: 2003.

20. Record Number: 8711
Author(s): Lawless, Catherine
Contributor(s):
Title : Women on the Margins: The "Beloved" and the "Mistress" in Renaissance Florence [The author discusses women who were in irrgular relationships with men, whether as idealized love objects or in extra-marital sexual relationships. The women involved range from the daughters of the most important families and nuns to slaves and poor women. While wealthy young brides like Ginevra de'Benci could flirt with romantic love without loss of status, concubines who lived outside the family structure risked marginality and illegitimacy for their children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women: Pawns or Players?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2003. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 111 - 130.
Year of Publication: 2003.

21. Record Number: 7914
Author(s): Simonetti, Adele.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margherita da Faenza tra storia e agiografia [Margherita of Faenza, an early abbess of the monastery founded by Umiltà of Faenza, lived in tension betwen her spiritual life and monastic business. Her biographers depict Margherita as achieving harmony between these tensions. The early lives of Marghe
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 9., ( 2002):  Pages 161 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2002.

22. Record Number: 10659
Author(s): Murphy, Kevin J.F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lilium inter spinas: Bianca Spini and the Decoration of the Spini Chapel in Santa Trinita [The author argues that Bianca, the widowed daughter of a wealthy and powerful member of the Spini family, commissioned an altarpiece for the family chapel with references to her personal identity. As a widow who evidently chose not to remarry, Bianca struggled with her husband's family for restitution of her dowry. The frequent suspicions about unmarried women's virtue seem to be answered in the Spini altarpiece painting of the Assumption by the Virgin's purity and authority. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Italian History and Culture , 8., ( 2002):  Pages 51 - 65.
Year of Publication: 2002.

23. Record Number: 8085
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Naming a Nun: Spiritual Exemplars and Corporate Identity in Florentine Convents, 1450-1530 [A newly professed nun frequently took a new name to mark her separation from the world and integration into a monastic community. This practice only slowly became common, especially for older girls entering monasteries. By the end of the fifteenth century, the practice, once sporadic, had become the norm. Names with classical or literary resonances were among those most frequently changed to more pious ones. Communities controlled their own naming practices, recycling the names of respected sisters for generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Rinascimento , 43., ( 2003):  Pages 215 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2002.

24. Record Number: 8802
Author(s): Sebregondi, Ludovica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothes and Teenagers: What Young Men Wore in Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author argues that young Florentine men wore distinctive clothing. Tight-fitting and revealing cothing that emphasized the wearer's masculinity were popular. Moralists complained but did not succeed in changing fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. Rinascimento , 43., ( 2003):  Pages 27 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2002.

25. Record Number: 8084
Author(s): Kirshner, Julius.
Contributor(s):
Title : Li Emergenti Bisogni Matrimoniali in Renaissance Florence
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Rinascimento , 43., ( 2003):  Pages 79 - 109. Reprinted in Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy. Written by Julius Kirshner. University of Toronto Press, 2015. Pages 55-73.
Year of Publication: 2002.

26. Record Number: 7066
Author(s): Nirit Ben-Aryeh, Debby.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Preacher as Women's Mentor [Although a preacher like the Dominican Observant Giovanni Dominici guided women's lives, his audience also influenced him. Dominici's sermons praised the patriarchal family and procreation, while decrying all extramarital sex. He also criticized girls who became nuns for the wrong reasons, including the lack of a suitable husband. Dominici shared the misogyny of his age, but he showed an intimate awareness of women's situations and concerns. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Preacher, Sermon and Audience in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Carolyn Muessig .   Brill, 2002. Rinascimento , 43., ( 2003):  Pages 229 - 254.
Year of Publication: 2002.

27. Record Number: 5906
Author(s): Maginnis, Hayden B. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images, Devotion, and the Beata Umiliana de' Cerchi [images are found speaking to medieval Italian saints, especially Franciscans, in the hagiographic sources; two pictures play this role in the life of the pious widow Umiliata de' Cerchi; these images function in her contact with the divine like Byzantine
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001.  Pages 13 - 20.
Year of Publication: 2001.

28. Record Number: 5908
Author(s): Smith, Janet G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Umiltà of Faenza: Her Florentine Convent and Its Art [in the early 16th century the Florentines destroyed the monastery of San Giovanni Evangelista, outside the walls, to improve the city's defenses; this house had been founded by the Vallombrosan nun Umiltà of Faenza; much of its surviving art depicts Umiltà with a weasel, the enemy of the serpent, symbol of evil; this animal was displaced in later art by a book, and that too vanished in Counter-Reformation depictions of Umiltà, in which she becomes a generic saint without distinguishing symbols].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001.  Pages 37 - 65.
Year of Publication: 2001.

29. Record Number: 5910
Author(s): Zuraw, Shelley E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Efficacious Madonna in Quattrocento Rome: Spirituality in the Service of Papal Power [depictions of Madonna and Child in Renaissance Rome are more stately and remote than those done contemporaneously in Florence; a partial explanation is the continuous Roman tradition of iconic painting tied to images ascribed to Saint Luke as painter; another factor is the formality of the papal court; contemporaneous Florentine paintings are more intimate because they are designed for families, even the most powerful households in the city; Florentine motifs can be found borrowed in Rome by the more adventurous artists].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001.  Pages 101 - 121.
Year of Publication: 2001.

30. Record Number: 13639
Author(s): Roussel, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : Réécritures de "Florence de Rome" au XIVe siècle [The author looks at fourteenth century adaptations of the "Florence de Rome" poem, in particular an anonymous version written in epic style. The story of Florence concerns a chaste queen denounced by her brother-in-law (whose advances she rejected), disbelieved by her husband, and forced to wander until she founds a hospital and is declared innocent by her accusers. In comparing the earlier version with the fourteenth century epic account, Roussel notes less reliance on detailed descriptions but more emphasis on awakening the audience's pity for Florence's suffering. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: L' Épopée romane au moyen âge et aux temps modernes: Actes du XIVe Congrès International de la Société Rencesvals pour l' étude des épopées romanes: Naples, 24-30 juillet 1997. 2 volumes.   Edited by Salvatore Luongo .   Fridericiana Editrice Universitaria, 2001.  Pages 815 - 826.
Year of Publication: 2001.

31. Record Number: 6748
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daughters, Mothers, Wives, and Widows: Women as Legal Persons [The author traces women's legal agency across the life span; each phase had its limits even widowhood in which many women had to struggle for the return of their dowry or accept remarriage at their natal family's behest].
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001. Italian History and Culture , 8., ( 2002):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2001.

32. Record Number: 5774
Author(s): Bryce, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing for Strangers: Women, Dance, and Music in Quattrocento Florence
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 4.1 (Winter 2001): 1074-1107. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

33. Record Number: 5720
Author(s): Woods-Marsden, Joanna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of the Lady, 1430- 1520 [the author traces the development of the patrician female ideal; portrait forms evolved very rapidly from the profile that suggested self-control and inaccessibility to the intimate frontal pose; the author argues that the change was due in part to the influence of humanism with its emphasis on the individual and subjectivity].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 62 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2001.

34. Record Number: 5718
Author(s): Kent, Dale.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Renaissance Florence [the author gives a brief overview of the factors and attendant evidence that characterized the lives of Florentine noble women including marriage and the painted wedding chests (cassone), childbirth and the celebratory birth trays, clothing and sumptuary laws, religious devotion, and death].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 24 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2001.

35. Record Number: 5719
Author(s): Kirkham, Victoria.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetic Ideals of Love and Beauty [The author examines the themes of love and beauty in the writings of Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Poliziano, and Lorenzo de'Medici].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 48 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2001.

36. Record Number: 5450
Author(s): Tinagli, Paola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Womanly Virtues in Quattrocento Florentine Marriage Furnishings [the author examines how behavioral ideals for both new husbands and wives, as represented on cassoni, spalliere, and other furnishings given to the bridal couple, emphasized chastity, restraint, and other virtues that contributed to a well-ordered civic society].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 265 - 284.
Year of Publication: 2000.

37. Record Number: 4636
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Viewing and Commissioning Pietro Lorenzetti's Saint Humility Polyptych
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 269 - 300.
Year of Publication: 2000.

38. Record Number: 5452
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Transformations of the "buona Gualdrada" Legend from Boccaccio to Vasari: A Study in the Politics of Florentine Narrative [the story was told that Gualdrada's father offered to order her to kiss the visiting Emperor Otho IV; she refused indignantly and reminded her father of his responsibilities to make a good marriage for her; for Boccaccio Gualdrada's act is a symbol of republican virtue, while for Vasari Gualdrada represents contemporary Florence and Cosimo de Medici, resisting the influence of Emperor Charles V].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 401 - 420.
Year of Publication: 2000.

39. Record Number: 4135
Author(s): Lawless, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Widow of God? St. Anne and Representations of Widowhood in Fifteenth-century Florence
Source: Women in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Christine Meek .   Four Courts Press, 2000. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 15 - 42.
Year of Publication: 2000.

40. Record Number: 5394
Author(s): Bryce, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Fifteenth Century: (ii) Vernacular Poetry and Mystery Plays [The author briefly highlights the work of two authors, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de'Medici and Antonia Pulci, both of whom drew on sacred themes for their subject matter].
Source: A History of Women's Writing in Italy.   Edited by Letizia Panizza and Sharon Wood .   Cambridge University Press, 2000. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 31 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2000.

41. Record Number: 5453
Author(s): Rawson, Judy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marrying for Love: Society in the Quattrocento Novella [The author suggests that Alberti wrote the "Istorietta" of two feuding families brought together by love and the determination of the women in both families].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 421 - 437.
Year of Publication: 2000.

42. Record Number: 6670
Author(s): Simonetti, Adele.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santita femminile vallombrosana fra due e trecento [Vallombrosan nuns brought the spirituality of the wilderness into cities like Florence; they fulfilled their individual spiritual needs in an institutional context acceptable to the Church, and they subordinated their own needs to those of the community; penitent women like Umilta of Faenza also became community assets through their reputations for piety and miracle working; Vallombrosan hagiography endorses apostolic poverty while avoiding the extremes of Franciscan claims to exceptionality].
Source: Il colloquio vallombrosano: L'Ordo Vallisumbrosae tra XII e XIII Secolo: Gli sviluppi istituzionali e culturali e l'espansione geografica (1101-1293):Vallombrosa, 25-28 agosto 1996. Vol. 1.   Edited by Giordano Monzo Compagnoni .   Edizioni Vallombrosa, 1999. Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 467 - 481.
Year of Publication: 1999.

43. Record Number: 5298
Author(s): Levin, William R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lost Children, a Working Mother, and the Progress of an Artist at the Florentine Misericordia in the Trecento [The author explores Ambrogio di Baldese's connections with the Misericordia confraternity and its shelter for abandoned children; Ambrogio's mother, Santina, had cared for the children before her son took over the responsibility].
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 34 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1999.

44. Record Number: 3657
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gravitas and Consumption [The author explores why the "sapientes," the leaders of Venice and Florence, regulated consumption for their wives, daughters and sons but not for themselves].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 215 - 242. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter IV.
Year of Publication: 1999.

45. Record Number: 4761
Author(s): Chabot, Isabelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lineage Strategies and the Control of Widows in Renaissance Florence [The author argues that to ensure the male monopoly over wealth and power, men manipulated maternity (ranging from relationships with children to inheritance) for the interests of their patrilineage].
Source: Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner .   Women and Men in History. Longman, 1999. Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 127 - 144.
Year of Publication: 1999.

46. Record Number: 3055
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing the Bridal Body in Fifteenth-Century Florence
Source: Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 182 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1998.

47. Record Number: 4619
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Cruel Mother": Maternity, Widowhood, and Dowry in Florence in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries [The author examines the plight of widows who were frequently forced to remarry by their natal families and leave their children behind with the first husbands' kin].
Source: Debating the Middle Ages: Issues and Readings.   Edited by Lester K. Little and Barbara H. Rosenwein .   Blackwell Publishers, 1998. Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 264 - 276. Originally published in Women, Family, and Ritual in Renaissance Italy. University of Chicago Press, 1985. Pages 117-131. Also reprinted in Feminism and Renaissance Studies. Edited by Lorna Hutson. Oxford Reading in Feminism series. Oxford University Pres
Year of Publication: 1998.

48. Record Number: 5686
Author(s): Gordon, Dillian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Zanobi Strozzi's "Annunciation" in the National Gallery [the recently discovered signature on the "Annunciation" makes it easier to identify Strozzi's work from other pupils of Fra Angelico; the author compares Strozzi's "Annunciation" to others done around the same time by Fra Angelico and his workshop].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 140, 1145 (August 1998): 517-524. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

49. Record Number: 3671
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Idol or Ideal? The Power and Potency of Female Public Sculpture [The author argues that by the late sixteenth century female statuary in Florence had been removed or moved to less prominent locations; the author suggests that there is a correlation with the patriarchal attitudes of the male art patrons].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Journal of Historical Sociology , 10., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 222 - 245.
Year of Publication: 1997.

50. Record Number: 5680
Author(s): Thomas, Anabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Date for Neri di Bicci's S. Giovannino dei Cavalieri "Coronation of the Virgin" [the author presents document transcriptions in the article's Appendix that prove that Neri di Bicci was selected by the nuns of S. Niccolò dei Frieri to paint an altarpiece in 1488; further document extracts indicate the nuns' additional efforts to make the high altar more splendid].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1127 (February 1997): 103-106. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

51. Record Number: 6667
Author(s): Kent, Francis W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sainted Mother, Magnificent Son: Lucrezia Tornabuoni and Lorenzo de' Medici
Source: Italian History and Culture , 3., ( 1997):  Pages 3 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1997.

52. Record Number: 3669
Author(s): Holmes, Megan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Disrobing the Virgin: The "Madonna Lactans" in Fifteenth-Century Florentine Art [the author argues that the popularity of the "Madonna lactans" waned from the 1440s through the 1470s because increased naturialism made the bare breast problematic; when the motif reappeared in the late fifteenth century , it was modified by making the Virgin less immediate and less accessible].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 167 - 195.
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 6668
Author(s): Ambrosio, Francis J.
Contributor(s):
Title : On Seeing Fra Angelico's San Marco "Annunciation": The Place of Art [the author meditates on the meaning of Fra Angelico's painting at the monastery of San Marco; Ambrosio explores the painter's understanding of Dominican beliefs and practices as well as more general ideas including Mary as a metaphor for freedom and contemplation].
Source: Italian History and Culture , 3., ( 1997):  Pages 87 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1997.

54. Record Number: 2003
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Review Essay: Family and Law in Late Medieval and Renaissance Florence [three recent books by Molho, Stern, and Trexler].
Source: Historian , 59., 2 (Winter 1997):  Pages 406 - 410.
Year of Publication: 1997.

55. Record Number: 2068
Author(s): Sydie, R.A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Phallocentric Gaze: Leon Battista Alberti and Visual Art
Source: Journal of Historical Sociology , 10., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 310 - 341.
Year of Publication: 1997.

56. Record Number: 741
Author(s): Molho, Anthony, Roberto Barducci, Gabriella Battista and Francesco Donnini
Contributor(s):
Title : Genealogy and Marriage Alliance: Memories of Power in Late Medieval Florence [Giovanni Rucellai's genealogies from 1457 and 1476 differ; the former emphasizes male descent, while the latter focuses on women who married into the Rucellai; it is suggested that the 1476 genealogy was intended to help Giovanni's grandsons identify relatives from the female side who could render favors during times of financial need.]
Source: Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Honor of David Herlihy.   Edited by Samual K. Cohn, Jr. and Steven A. Epstein .   University of Michigan Press, 1996. Italian History and Culture , 3., ( 1997):  Pages 39 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1996.

57. Record Number: 7448
Author(s): Chabot, Isabelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Risorse e diritti patrimoniali [The Black Death (1348) frequently put wealth into the hands of women by killing off male heirs. Subsequent efforts to limit a daughter's property to her dowry was counterbalanced by inheritance through wills. Roman law gave women an equal claim on an inheritance, but Italian statutes severely limited that right. The cities also were slow to let women inherit where any male heirs existed. Birth families often struggled with husbands over control of the daughter's dowry and had to claim restitution if the husband predeceased the wife. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 47 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1996.

58. Record Number: 7450
Author(s): Angiolini, Franco.
Contributor(s):
Title : Schiave [In the Middle Ages, slaves brought into Italy primarily came from the Black Sea region, and most were women. The sixteenth century saw an inversion of the gender ratio, as well as fresh supplies from Africa, the Balkans, and, for a time, Muslim Granada. There also was a shift from domestic to agricultural bondage. Slave women were exploited sexually, but some attained manumission through marriage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 92 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1996.

59. Record Number: 546
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Understanding Gender Inequality in Renaissance Florence: Personhood and Gifts of Maternal Inheritance by Women
Source: Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 58 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1996.

60. Record Number: 2992
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Infant Death in Late Medieval Florence: The Smothering Hypothesis Reconsidered [argues that some infant deaths ascribed to neglectful wet nurses may have been caused by sudden infant death syndrome; neglectful wet nurses did feed female infants less].
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 137 - 153.
Year of Publication: 1996.

61. Record Number: 230
Author(s): Long, Jane C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Salvation Through Meditation: The Tomb Frescoes in the Holy Confessors Chapel at Santa Croce in Florence [one prominently portrays a female donor]
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 77-88. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

62. Record Number: 5673
Author(s): Gordon, Dillian and Anabel Thomas
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Document for the High Altar-piece for S. Benedetto Fuori della Porta Pinti, Florence [the document from the State Archives in Florence records the commission in 1407 of an altarpiece at S. Benedetto by a wealthy layman].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1112 (November 1995): 720-722. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

63. Record Number: 5653
Author(s): Nelson, Jonathan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Place of Women in Filippino Lippi's Nerli Altarpiece [the author argues that the donor portrait of Nanna, wife of Tanai de' Nerli, as well as the domestic scene in the background of husband, wife, and small child, were intended to enhance Tanai's role as husband and father; Nanna is not represented as an individual but as an ideal wife: modest, pious, and honorable].
Source: Italian History and Culture , 1., ( 1995):  Pages 65 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1995.

64. Record Number: 5674
Author(s): Gordon, Dillian.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Altar-piece by Lorenzo Monaco in the National Gallery, London [the author argues that Monaco's "Coronation of the Virgin" now in the National Gallery was the center panel of the altarpiece for S. Benedetto commissioned in 1407 by a wealthy layman; the text of that commission is reproduced in the Appendix, page 722 of the preceding article].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1112 (November 1995): 723-727. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

65. Record Number: 6014
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes et la mort à la fin du moyen age [the author provides an overview of female mortality based on statistics taken from Florentine ricordanze (which often included family memoirs) for both girls and married women; the author notes the discrepancy in female versus male survival rates with men living in significantly larger proportions from childhood onward; the author also notes the higher mortality rates for women due to death during childbirth].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995.  Pages 207 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1995.

66. Record Number: 6016
Author(s): Furlan, Francesco.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'idea della donna nella cultura della prima metà del Quattrocento toscano [for the Middle Ages we have vastly more material written by men than by women, and the evidence is skewed in favor of the upper classes; much of early and high medieval writing on women was influenced by the misogyny of Jerome and favored celibacy; late medieval theologians came to speak more highly of marriage and the family, but they still favored discipline as the ideal for women; the humanists placed even greater emphasis on marriage; Italian merchants placed a great emphasis on procreation, but their memoirs can speak of wives in loving terms].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995.  Pages 251 - 270.
Year of Publication: 1995.

67. Record Number: 177
Author(s): Haas, Louis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mio Buono Compare: Choosing Godparents and the Uses of Baptismal Kinship in Renaissance Florence
Source: Journal of Social History , 29., 2 (Winter 1995):  Pages 341 - 356.
Year of Publication: 1995.

68. Record Number: 407
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints, Wives, and Other "Hooly Thynges": Pious Laywomen in Middle English Romance
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 137 - 154. Ed. by Jean Host and Michael N. Salda. D.S. Brewer
Year of Publication: 1995.

69. Record Number: 4684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Patrons: Nuns, Widows, and Rulers
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995. Chaucer Yearbook , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 242 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1995.

70. Record Number: 5675
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : New Documents Concerning Desiderio da Settignano and Annalena Malatesta [notarial records survive in which Annalena Malatesta, a noble and wealthy widow, paid the scupltor Desiderio da Settignano for a statue of Mary Magdalene and a bust of Christ; in the Appendix to the article the author transcribes the relevant extracts from the ledger for Annalena; although Annalena founded a Tertiary Dominican house for the protection and education of young widows and virgins, the sculpture of Mary Magdalene was evidently not intended for the convent but for S. Trinità and the altar of the Cerbini family which included Annalena's notary].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1113 (December 1995): 792-799. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

71. Record Number: 16623
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane
Contributor(s):
Title : Les femmes dans les rituels de l'alliance et de la naissance à Florence [Christiane Klapisch-Zuber explores Florentine women's roles in rituals celebrating marriage and childbirth. She looks in particular at the meanings of "cassoni" (wedding chests) and "deschi da parto" (painted plates associated with the birth of children). She frequently finds situations in which the needs of the patrilineage and family honor trump the concerns of wives, mothers, and their natal families. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994. Quaderni Storici , 2 (agosto 1994):  Pages 3 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1994.

72. Record Number: 5348
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Albero genealogico e construzione della parentela nel Rinascimento [Florentines of all classes had their sense of family lineage, one molded by their ideas of gender relations; patrimony ordinarily was transmitted through the male line, and family records often ignored daughters; kin by marriage or in the maternal line are acknowledged but are given less attention than are blood kin in the paternal line in records left by maels; females, where they have left documentation, were more open to mentioning kin by marriage or in the meternal line].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 2 (agosto 1994):  Pages 405 - 420.
Year of Publication: 1994.

73. Record Number: 5301
Author(s): Chabot, Isabelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Sposa in Nero. La Ritualizzazione del Lutto delle Vedove Fiorentine (Secoli XIV-XV) [the Italian dowry system gave the husband temporary control of additional property, but his death deprived his paternal kin group of that property ; Florentine marriage ceremonies emphasized an exchange of gifts, but these rituals did not always include permanent transfer of the objects given; a new widow was dressed in mourning by her husband's family to display family solidarity, but any effort to leave the home or remarry was resisted, partly because property would pass out of the family's control; a marriageable widow might be returned to her birth family in a procession mirroring the earlier one to her husband's house on her wedding day; a long-term trend, however, saw the husband's family gain a greater share of the goods the wife had brought to the marriage].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 2 (agosto 1994):  Pages 421 - 462.
Year of Publication: 1994.

74. Record Number: 6259
Author(s): Martelli, Mario.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lucrezia Tornabuoni [Lucrezia was married young into the Medici family when it was just consolidating its power; she wrote poetry in Italian, mostly on sacred themes; Lucrezia took part in the political and cultural developments of the Medici regime as a wife, mother, mother-in-law, and poet].
Source: Les Femmes écrivains en Italie au moyen âge et à la renaissance. Actes du colloque international Aix-en-Provence, 12, 13, 14 novembre 1992. .   Université de Provence, 1994. Quaderni Storici , 2 (agosto 1994):  Pages 51 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1994.

75. Record Number: 5098
Author(s): Dabrowska, Elzbieta.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Crosse de l'Abbesse Florence et la sépulture des abbesses du XIe au XIIIe siècle
Source: Les Religieuses dans le Cloître et dans le Monde des Origines à Nos Jours. Actes du Deuxième Colloque International de C.E.R.C.O.R. Poitiers, 29 septembre-2 octobre 1988. .   Publications de l'Université de Sainte-Etienne, 1994. Quaderni Storici , 2 (agosto 1994):  Pages 111 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1994.

76. Record Number: 6430
Author(s): Paden, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elissa: La Ghibellina del "Decameron" [the "Decameron" reflects the political divisions of Florence and Italy as a whole; one character, Elissa, represents the Ghibelline (Pro-Imperial) viewpoint; Elissa's stories with political themes earn a satirical response from Dioneo; eventually Elissa learns to compromise with her companihttps://inpress.lib.uiowa.edu/feminae/ArticleOfTheMonth.aspxons toward the rebuilding of society].
Source: Rivista di Studi Italiani , 11., 2 (Dicembre 1993):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 1993.

77. Record Number: 12729
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donatello's Bronze 'David': Grillanda, Goliath, Groom? [Art historians have explored many perspectives on Donatello's youthful and androgynous representation of the nude David including psychoanalytic and homoerotic perspectives, but these male centered approaches overlook the possibility of a female audience for the statue. Paintings on contemporary Florentine cassoni (wedding chests), including scenes from the life of David (like his battle with Goliath or his subsequent wedding to a royal bride) or seemingly unrelated depictions of scantily clad males (often painted underneath the lids), establish the possibility of a wedding context for Donatello's sensuous nude. In the context of nuptial imagery, this representation of David might appeal to a prospective bride as well as the narcissistic or homoerotic desire of an imagined male audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1993.

78. Record Number: 6389
Author(s): Guimbard, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Appunti sulla legislazione suntuaria a Firenze dal 1281 al 1384 [as the Florentine republic matured, it began to regulate women's dress and expenditures on private festivities to safeguard the stability of the commune; limitations on women's costume was part of a larger effort to moderate any personal expressions that might lead to public disorder; these laws diminished differences between classes without removing them; various arrangements were made for enforcing these laws, including assigning special magistrates to that work; sumptuary laws, however, could not prevent a growing trend toward self expression].
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):  Pages 57 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1992.

79. Record Number: 10224
Author(s): Cassidy, Brendan
Contributor(s):
Title : Orcagna’s Tabernacle in Florence: Design and Function [In the mid-fourteenth century, Andrea Orcagna was commissioned to design a new shrine to house an image of the Madonna in the Church of Orsanmichele in Florence. The author describes the original appearance of the shrine and the devotional purposes it served, as well as the shrine’s relationship to an earlier tabernacle that stood in Orsanmichele. The shrine provided a focus for devotion to the Virgin, and although it was not originally designed for celebration of the Mass, it was at some point converted to include an altar for that purpose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 180 - 211.
Year of Publication: 1992.

80. Record Number: 6681
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Un Salario o l'onore: come valutare le donne Fiorentine del XIV- XV secolo [in Renaissance Italy, a married woman's honor was incompatible with such public functions as gainful employment; an unmarried woman or a widow was more likely to seek employment, although a married woman might make thread or cloth at home; the married woman's economic identity was supposed to be submerged in that of her husband].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1992):  Pages 41 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1992.

81. Record Number: 8574
Author(s): Crabb, Ann Morton.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Typical Was Alessandra Macinghi Strozzi of Fifteenth-Century Florentine Widows? [The author studies a Florentine widow who became an agent and representative of her family (a role normally unavailable to patrician women, but one that carried many hardships) after her husband's death in exile. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1992):  Pages 47 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1992.

82. Record Number: 11225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Relic, Some Pictures and the Mothers of Florence in the Late Fourteenth Century
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 30, 2 (1991): 91-99. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

83. Record Number: 10893
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marian Politics in Quattrocento Florence: The Renewed Dedication of Santa Maria del Fiore in 1412 [The author argues that the political leaders of Florence chose in 1412 to identify the state with the Virgin Mary in the rededication of the cathedral to "Santa Maria del Fiore." The lily symbolized not only Mary's purity but also the city of Florence. M
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 44., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 673 - 719.
Year of Publication: 1991.

84. Record Number: 9541
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : “La Festa di Susanna”: Virtue on Trial in Renaissance Sacred Drama and Painted Wedding Chests [The author examines paintings of Susanna that appear on many fifteenth-century cassoni (wedding chests given to brides upon marriage and also used to transport dowry goods). In fifteenth-century Florence, cassoni paintings and sacred theatrical performances (“sacre rappresentazioni”) engaged in a problematic display of feminine virtue. Domenico di Michelino’s “Susanna and the Elders” panel, originally a cassone painting, depicts scenes from “La Festa di Susanna” (a fifteenth-century “sacra rappresentazione”) along with events from the Biblical narrative. The painting thus invites the viewer to consider not only the example of the Biblical heroine Susanna but also a larger host of contemporary legal, economic, and social issues. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 329 - 344.
Year of Publication: 1991.

85. Record Number: 13262
Author(s): Crum, Roger J. and David G. Wilkins
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Defense of Florentine Republicanism: Saint Anne and Florentine Art, 1343-1575 [After Walter of Brienne was expelled from Florence on her feast, Saint Anne became a patron saint of Florence. Her feast was a public holiday, and a chapel was built in her honor. Anne's cult was especially popular whenever the Florentine commune was threatened, including by the Medici. When the Medici triumphed, they coopted the saint to watch over their family's rule. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Interpreting Cultural Symbols: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Society.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Pamela Sheingorn .   The University of Georgia Press, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 131 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1990.

86. Record Number: 8645
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Una santa vedova [Left a young widow with children, Umiliata declined remarriage. She passed the remainder of her life in her father’s house treated like a servant and distracted from prayer by male relatives. After her death, Umiliata’s cult was promoted by the Franciscans. Her children later favored the Franciscan convent of Santa Croce. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 59 - 98. Earlier published in Studies in Church History 27 (1990): 53-78.
Year of Publication: 1990.

87. Record Number: 8648
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : La serva padrona Verdiana da Castelfiorentino is one of the few servants among the revered Tuscan holy women of the later Middle Ages. She, like Saint Zita, was part of a wave of migration from rural areas to the cities in Tuscany. These servant-saints displayed domestic virtues, like generosity; but they also went on pilgrimage. Some experienced local hostility, but Verdiana was supported locally and became known as a wonder worker. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 263 - 303. Originally printed as "Santità femminile nel territorio fiorentino e lucchese: considerazioni intorno alla caso di Verdiana da Castelfiorentino," in Religiosità e società in Valdelsa (Società storica della Valdelsa, 1980). Pages 113-144.
Year of Publication: 1990.

88. Record Number: 8651
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Forme comunitarie [The Franciscan third order originated as a para-monastic status for penitent women. It became, in the fifteenth century, assimilated to a monastic model. The popes permitted common dwellings and conceded privileges, but they expected strict monastic enclosure. Some of the Tuscan houses of tertiaries were tied to convents of the Franciscan observant movement. Appendix: pp. 589-592 Rule of the Third Order, from MS Palatino 118 in the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Florence. Originally printed as "Le forme comunitarie della penitenza femminile francescana: Schede per un censimento toscano," in Prime manifestazioni di vita comunitaria maschile e femminile nel movimento francescano della penitenza: Atti del convegno di studi francescani, Assisi 30 giugno-2 luglio 1981, edited by R. Pazzelli and L. Temperini (Commissione Storica Internazionale T.O.R., 1982). Pages 389-449. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 531 - 592. Originally printed as "Le forme comunitarie della penitenza femminile francescana: Schede per un censimento toscano," in Prime manifestazioni di vita comunitaria maschile e femminile nel movimento francescano della penitenza: Atti del convegno di studi fr
Year of Publication: 1990.

89. Record Number: 8652
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donne religiose nella Firenze del Due-Trecento [The calling of Florentine recluses was grounded in the hermit tradition, but their lives came to be regulated according to monastic norms. The hermit ideal was rural, but these women were urban. Communities of recluses could come into conflict with local ecclesiastical authorities, but they often had important lay patrons. Marginal women, including widows and ex-prostitutes, often found homes in communities of penitents. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 593 - 634. Originally printed as "Donne religiose nella Firenze del Due-Trecento: Appunti per una ricerca in corso," in Le mouvement confraternel au Moyen Âge: France, Suisse, Italie: Actes de la table ronde, Lausanne 9-11 mai 1985 (Droz, 1987). Pages 41-82.
Year of Publication: 1990.

90. Record Number: 8653
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : In domo bighittarum seu viduarum: Pubblica assistenza e marginalità nella Firenze medievale [Assistance by ecclesiastical institutions to the poor and unfortunate was grounded in the tradition of monastic hospitality. The demand for relief grew as urban life revived in the later Middle Ages. Among those most in need were marginalized women, including poor widows and ex-prostitutes. By the 13th century, Florence and other Italian communes were involved in regulating services to the poor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 635 - 665. Originally published in Città e servizi sociali nell’Italia dei secoli XII-XV: Atti del dodicesimo convegno internazionale del Centro italiano di studi di storia e d’arte di Pistoia, 2-12 ottobre 1987 (Presso la sede del Centro, 1990). Pages 325-353.
Year of Publication: 1990.

91. Record Number: 8656
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Padri spirituali [The mendicant movement coincided with an increase in the number of penitent women living in the world. Friars frequently became confessors and spiritual guides for these women. Friars advised them how to lead a spiritual life outside the cloister without yielding to temptation or becoming suspected of heresy. Writers like Francesco da Barberino were critical of these close ties between religious and uncloistered. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 205 - 246. Earlier published in Studies in Church History 27 (1990): 53-78.
Year of Publication: 1990.

92. Record Number: 28833
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Title : Madonna della Misericordia
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/78/Madonna_della_Misericordia.JPG/250px-Madonna_della_Misericordia.JPG
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93. Record Number: 40436
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Title : Saint Helena Bringing the True Cross to Jerusalem (detail)
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