Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


36 Record(s) Found in our database

SEE ALSO: parents

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1. Record Number: 11500
Author(s): Muessig, Carolyn
Contributor(s):
Title : Inherited Status and Slavery in Late Medieval Italy and Venetian Crete [In comparing the situation of slaves' children fathered by their masters in Crete and in the mainland cities of Venice, Genoa, and Florence, the author argues that "Latin" ancestry counted in the colonial setting but not in the Italian cities. Introducing children of mixed parentage into society mattered more for a frontier society where the conquering Western Europeans were in the minority. However, in both areas in the late Middle Ages, custom pushed to extend free status to the children of slaves by assuming that the children inherited their fathers' status rather than their mothers' servile condition. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Past and Present , 182., (February 2004):  Pages 31 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 9501
Author(s): Lee, Becky R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men's Recollections of a Women's Rite: Medieval English Men's Recollections Regarding the Rite of the Purification of Women after Childbirth
Source: Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 224 - 241.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 7252
Author(s): Sheingorn, Pamela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Joseph the Carpenter's Failure at Familial Discipline [The author examines representations of Joseph in some fourteenth century texts and illustrations concerning apocryphal stories of the flight into Egypt. He is presented very negatively both as a Jew and a member of the lower class. His masculinity is even further questioned because he cannot protect his family nor can he assert his patriarchal authority over his wife and child. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Past and Present , 182., (February 2004):  Pages 156 - 167.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 8083
Author(s): Najemy, John M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Giannozzo and His Elders: Alberti's Critique of Renaissance Patriarchy [The author argues that the figure of Giannozzo is used by Alberti to criticize the arbitrary power of fathers over sons and the resulting efforts of sons to control their wives, thereby recuperating some of their lost masculinity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Past and Present , 182., (February 2004):  Pages 51 - 78.
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 7250
Author(s): Golden, Judith K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Instruction, Marie de Bretagne, and the Life of St. Eustace as Illustrated in British Library Ms. Egerton 745 [The author argues that Egerton 745 was commissioned by Marie de Bretagne, daughter of a duke of Brittany and granddaughter of a king and queen of England (hence the saints' lives included for two Breton saints and Edward the Confessor). She had the manuscript prepared for her son, choosing to emphasize role models, especially Saint Eustace, who were good husbands, fathers, and Christians. The Appendix lists and describes twenty-two works of art that represent the cycle of St. Eustace's life. Also included is a table that charts the various episodes represented in the twenty-two art works. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Past and Present , 182., (February 2004):  Pages 60 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 7271
Author(s): McCracken, Peggy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Engendering Sacrifice: Blood, Lineage, and Infanticide in Old French Literature [The author analyzes the theme of infanticide in Chretien de Troyes' "Philomena," "Ami et Amile," accounts of Abraham and Isaac, and "Jourdain de Blaye." The author argues that the child's death takes on a different meaning according to the gender of the sacrificer. When the father kills the child, the blood is paternal blood and represents a sacrifice for loyalty or for God. When the mother kills the child, the blood is maternal, associated with the impurities of childbirth, and is done only as an act of revenge. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 55 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 8079
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reframing the Violence of the Father: Reverse Oedipal Fantasies in Chaucer's Clerk's, Man of Law's, and Prioress's Tales [The author argues that the family relations both in the tales of Griselda and of Custance manifest a profound anxiety about paternity and a need for concealed violence, both physical and psychic. The happy endings do not mask the father's violence and the conflict between the generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 122 - 138.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 7909
Author(s): Bott, Robin L.
Contributor(s):
Title : O, Keep Me from Their Worse Than Killing Lust: Ideologies of Rape and Mutilation in Chaucer's "Physician's Tale" and Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 189 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 6926
Author(s): Rasmussen, Ann Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers to Think Back Through: The Middle High German Mother-Daughter and Father-Son Advice Poems known as "Die Winsbeckin" and "Der Winsbecke" ["In particular, the essay examines the 'enabling' notions of authenticity, authorship, and paternal authority that shaped scholarship on the poems from 1845 to 1985. The trope of a father instructing his son furnished a productive framework for the overwhelmingly male professional caste of nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars to 'think back through,' I will argue, as they constructed notions of conduct literature that privileged a version of paternal, secular authority and that rested at times on a nostalgic belief that didactic literature was imbued with an authentic connection to lived medieval experience." p. 109].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 106 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 10161
Author(s): Sobczyk, Agata
Contributor(s):
Title : Encore un inceste occulté: l'épisode de la fille de l'empereur dans "Le Roman de Robert le Diable"
Source: Études Médiévales , 1., ( 1999):  Pages 221 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1999.

11. Record Number: 3743
Author(s): Martinez-Gros, Gabriel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Frustrated Masculinity: The Relationship Between William the Conqueror and His Eldest Son [The author suggests that William tried to prolong Robert's youth; Robert had difficulties attaining adult masculinity because he lacked three important things: an access to power, an independent household, and public recognition as a fully gendered male]
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 39 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1999.

12. Record Number: 3649
Author(s): McLaughlin, Megan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Secular and Spiritual Fatherhood in the Eleventh Century [The author argues that Peter Damian saw the spiritual father's role involving potency, strict authority, and affectionate tenderness].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 25 - 43.
Year of Publication: 1999.

13. Record Number: 3661
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers and Daughters: Marriage Laws and Marriage Disputes in Bologna and Italy, 1200-1500 [The author analyzes criminal law and court cases involving adultery, bigamy, rape and clandestine marriages, concluding with case studies from Bologna].
Source: Marriage in Italy, 1300-1650.   Edited by Trevor Dean and K. J. P. Lowe .   Cambridge University Press, 1998. Études Médiévales , 1., ( 1999):  Pages 85 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1998.

14. Record Number: 1846
Author(s): Sweetman, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thomas of CantimprŽ, "Mulieres Religiosae," and Purgatorial Piety: Hagiographical "Vitae" and the Beguine "Voice"
Source: A Distinct Voice: Medieval Studies in Honor of Leonard E. Boyle, O.P.   Edited by Jacqueline Brown and William P. Stoneman .   University of Notre Dame Press, 1997. Études Médiévales , 1., ( 1999):  Pages 606 - 628.
Year of Publication: 1997.

15. Record Number: 2502
Author(s): Cadden, Joan.
Contributor(s):
Title : On a Daughter's Death, Venice, 1477 [a Venetian physician notes in a colophon the death of his infant daughter; includes the brief Latin text with English translation].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 15 - 17.
Year of Publication: 1997.

16. Record Number: 2504
Author(s): Hovland, Deborah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mothers and Fathers in the Early French Farce
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 20 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 2509
Author(s): White, Catherine L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Their Fathers in Three French Medieval Literary Works ["Le Roman de Silence," "Erec et Enide," and "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames"].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 42 - 45.
Year of Publication: 1997.

18. Record Number: 2506
Author(s): McLaughlin, Megan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Abominable Mingling: Father-Daughter Incest and the Law
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 26 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 1918
Author(s): Schulman, N. M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Husband, Father, Bishop? Grosseteste in Paris [suggests, based on a bequest of a house, that Grosseteste may have lived in Paris for over twenty years and had a wife and three children; the article includes a edition of the bequest from the cartulary of Sainte-Opportune].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 72, 2 (April 1997): 330-346. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 2332
Author(s): Szarmach, Paul E.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Euphrosyne: Holy Transvestite
Source: Holy Men and Holy Women: Old English Prose Saints' Live and Their Contexts.   Edited by Paul E. Szarmach .   State University of New York Press, 1996. Monatshefte , 88., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 353 - 365.
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 546
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Understanding Gender Inequality in Renaissance Florence: Personhood and Gifts of Maternal Inheritance by Women
Source: Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 58 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 2994
Author(s): Itnyre, Cathy Jorgensen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Emotional Universe of Medieval Icelandic Fathers and Sons [discusses the qualities that fathers want to find in their sons including courage, obedience, concern for family honor, and a physical ressemblance to the father; also breifly discusses the qualities that dissapoint including cowardice, disobedience, and associating with bad company].
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Journal of Women's History , 8., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 173 - 196.
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 952
Author(s): Gradowicz- Pancer, Nira.
Contributor(s):
Title : Papa, mama, l' abbé et moi. "Conversion morum" et pathologie familiale d' après les sources hagiographiques du haut Moyen Age [suggests that young men joined monasteries in search of an ideal father figure, the abbot, because their own fathers were absent or harsh; mothers in the sources were, for the most part, nurturing and encouraged their sons' religious vocations].
Source: Moyen Age , 102., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 7 - 25.
Year of Publication: 1996.

24. Record Number: 2995
Author(s): Cuesta, María Luzdivina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Notes on Family Relationships in Medieval Castilian Narrative
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Moyen Age , 102., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 197 - 224.
Year of Publication: 1996.

25. Record Number: 615
Author(s): Claussen, M. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers of Power and Mothers of Authority: Dhuoda and the "Liber manualis" [Dhuoda uses scripture and St. Benedict's rule to teach her son Christian values].
Source: French Historical Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 19, 3 (Spring 1996): 785-809. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

26. Record Number: 1861
Author(s): Palmer, Craig.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Question of Manhood: Overcoming the Paternal Homoerotic in Gottfried's "Tristan"
Source: Monatshefte , 88., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 17 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1996.

27. Record Number: 6778
Author(s): Cowgill, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Missing Children ["In the lyrics, the drama, and in Chaucer's religious tales, then, the sufferings of mothers and children are made analogous to those of Mary and Christ. Children are appropriate, even essential, to this genre because, in their relationships to their mothers, they embody one of the central mysteries of the faith. Conversely, the relationships between fathers and suffering children, while presented as significant in the tales of tragedy and morality, hint at but cannot carry the same spiritual valence. Further, to recapitulate my introductory remarks, children are largely absent from the romances and fabliaux because they would be a hindrance to the internal necessities of those forms. Children are depicted in 'The Canterbury Tales' not according to any principles of realism, but according to their appropriateness to particular literary genres." p. 5 of the electronic version available through Project Muse].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 12., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 5. and 1-2 (notes) [in the electronic version available through Project Muse]. Issue title: Children and the Family in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 6779
Author(s): Kiefer, Lauren.
Contributor(s):
Title : My Family First: Draft-dodging Parents in the "Confessio Amantis" [The author examines the theme of men's bonds to their children and wives in Books Three, Four, and Five of the "Confessio Amantis," concentrating on the stories of Ulysses and Namplus who were devoted to their sons].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 12., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 5. and 1-2 (notes) [in the electronic version available through Project Muse]. Issue title: Children and the Family in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 2525
Author(s): Gravdal, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Confessing Incests: Legal Erasures and Literary Celebrations in Medieval France [a study of the narrative structures related to gender in six old French incest stories: "Dit de la bourgeoise de Rome," "Dit du boeuf," "Vie de Saint Grégoire," "La Manekine," "Roman du Comte d'Anjou," and "Belle Hélène de Constantinople"].
Source: Comparative Literature Studies , 32., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 280 - 295.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 6732
Author(s): Kruk, Remke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ibn Battuta: Travel, Family Life, and Chronology: How Seriously Do We Take a Father? [the author analyzes Ibn Battuta's mentions of women and children in his text, finding that he enjoys the company of women, both his wives and his slaves; although he leaves his wives behind on his travels, he appears to have an interest in his wives and children since he sometimes returns to visit or sends them money].
Source: Al-Qantara , 16., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 369 - 384.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 1353
Author(s): Corthals, Johan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affiliation of Children: "Immathchor nAilella Ocus Airt"
Source: Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland , 9., ( 1995):  Pages 92 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1995.

32. Record Number: 11222
Author(s): Saller, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : European Family History and Roman Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 335 - 346.
Year of Publication: 1991.

33. Record Number: 11223
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The European Family and Canon Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 347 - 360.
Year of Publication: 1991.

34. Record Number: 10687
Author(s): Bowers, John M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The House of Chaucer & Son: The Business of Lancastrian Canon-Formation [The author argues that Thomas Chaucer, son of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, maintained the lease on his father’s tenement in Westminster Abbey in order to maintain control over the poet’s manuscripts. Here, exemplars for the authoritative Chaucer manuscripts were assembled for copying by professional scribes. By overseeing the transmission of his father’s texts, Thomas wished to maintain political connections to the Lancastrians (the ruling dynasty) and to establish Chaucer’s place in the canon as the “father” of English poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 135 - 143.
Year of Publication: 1991.

35. Record Number: 12698
Author(s): Turner, Ralph V.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Children of Anglo-Norman Royalty and Their Upbringing [Although royals did demonstrate affection toward their children (both legitimate and illegitimate), aristocratic parents did not consider childcare their primary responsibility. Although noblewomen participated in the education of children, they saw other roles as more important: supervising household affairs, acting as regents when their husbands were away, giving birth to heirs, and negotiating marriage alliances for their sons and daughters. Many other people (including household servants, nurses, and relatives) shared the responsibility of childrearing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 17 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1990.

36. Record Number: 40713
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Double portrait of Federico da Montefeltro and his son Guidobaldo
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):
Year of Publication: