Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


22 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 32554
Author(s): McCall, Timothy,
Contributor(s):
Title : Brilliant Bodies: Material Culture and the Adornment of Men in North Italy’s Quattrocento Courts
Source: I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 445 - 490.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 38478
Author(s): [no author]
Contributor(s):
Title : La Prammatica sulle vesti delle donne fiorentine (Firenze 1343-1345)
Source: Draghi rossi e querce azzurre: elenchi descrittivi di abiti di lusso (Firenze 1343-1345).   Edited by Laurence Gérard-Marchant .   SISMEL, 2013. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 1 - 516.
Year of Publication: 2013.

3. Record Number: 30087
Author(s): Schlotheuber, Eva
Contributor(s):
Title : Best Clothes and Everyday Attire of Late Medieval Nuns
Source: Fashion and Clothing in Late Medieval Europe/ Mode und Kleidung im Europa des späten Mittelalters.   Edited by Regula Schorta and Rainer C. Schwinges .   Abegg-Stiftung/Schwabe Verlag, 2010. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 139 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2010.

4. Record Number: 14144
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Gifts and Fashion Mischief [Susan Mosher Stuard in "Marriage Gifts and Fashion Mischief" details Italian wedding transactions, including the Lombard "male dowry," and the Roman bride's fiscal gift to her husband. She links the increasing pressure from husbands to receive liquid ass
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 169 - 185. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter V.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 12609
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Limiting Yardage and Changes of Clothes: Sumptuary Legislation in Thirteenth-Century France, Languedoc, and Italy [In Western Europe, the first laws to control the expenditure and display of dress by laypersons appeared in the thirteenth century. The initial period of regulating activity in Occitania, France, and Italy developed from ecclesiastical laws regulating clerical dress, but the political origins and motivations for the legislation varied by region. Italian and Occitan cities based their legislation upon Roman law, while northern regions of France used customary law; the cities of Montpellier and Siena focused more attention on women’s display than men’s, while most French regions were more interested in keeping a clear correlation between social status and wealth in general. The effects of sumptuary legislation on people in these regions are reflected by numerous sartorial concerns in contemporary vernacular poetry and didactic literatures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 121 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 8802
Author(s): Sebregondi, Ludovica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothes and Teenagers: What Young Men Wore in Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author argues that young Florentine men wore distinctive clothing. Tight-fitting and revealing cothing that emphasized the wearer's masculinity were popular. Moralists complained but did not succeed in changing fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 27 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 6924
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nouvelles Choses: Social Instability and the Problem of Fashion in the "Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry," the "Ménagier de Paris," and Christine de Pizan's "Livre des Trois Vertus" [The author argues that the anti-fashion discourse in the three texts confirms that sumptuary laws and the criticisms of authorities could not control women's desires for new fashions in clothing. In fact in the descriptions and illustrations of fashions
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 49 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 6051
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Light as Glamor: The Luminescent Ideal of Beauty in the "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 934 - 959.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 4637
Author(s): Gibbons, Rachel C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen as "Social Mannequin." Consumerism and Expenditure at the Court of Isabeau of Bavaria, 1393- 1422
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 371 - 395.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 4884
Author(s): Ambrosio, Francis J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminist Self-Fashioning: Christine de Pizan and "The Treasure of the City of Ladies"
Source: European Journal of Women's Studies , 6., 1 (February 1999):  Pages 9 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1999.

12. Record Number: 3657
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gravitas and Consumption [The author explores why the "sapientes," the leaders of Venice and Florence, regulated consumption for their wives, daughters and sons but not for themselves].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. European Journal of Women's Studies , 6., 1 (February 1999):  Pages 215 - 242. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter IV.
Year of Publication: 1999.

13. Record Number: 10523
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Regulating Women’s Fashion [Obsession with fashion was not seen as a particularly feminine problem until the twelfth century, when it became common to condemn women for their appetite for fancy clothing. As commerce in cloth increased, excessive clothing became increasingly associated with women. Governments enacted sumptuary laws (specifying what styles and colors of clothes one could wear) in order to fix social rank and status through clothing. Bourgeois women who were able to adopt rich array and change clothes according to recent fashion trends threatened social hierarchies. In the later Middle Ages clothing began to take on new meanings; it was seen not only as a mark of social status but as a sign of virtue or sin. Women often evaded the clothing constraints forced upon them, thereby reordering social distinctions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. European Journal of Women's Studies , 6., 1 (February 1999):  Pages 136 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1992.

14. Record Number: 9527
Author(s): Banner, Lois.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Fashionable Sex, 1100-1600 [The bodies of young men were often eroticized in late medieval and early modern Europe. Men’s clothing emphasized parts of the body associated with male sexuality and power, with shoes emphasizing the feet, fitted tights and trousers highlighting the legs, and codpieces drawing attention to the genitals. Clothing also indicated social class; for instance, poulaines (long, slender shoes) were associated with aristocrats and broad, short shoes with peasants. Changes in warfare and in social attitudes influenced evolving male fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: History Today , 42., (April 1992):  Pages 37 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1992.

15. Record Number: 12670
Author(s): Dufresne, Laura Rinaldi.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman of Excellent Character: A Case Study of Dress, Reputation, and the Changing Costume of Christine de Pizan in the Fifteenth Century [The author surveys fifteenth century manuscript representations of Christine de Pizan. During her lifetime in manuscripts prepared under her supervision, Christine is presented in modest dress as befits a scirbe and court author. This is in keeping with the message of "Le Trésor" which emphasizes proper conduct for women of every social group. Manuscripts from later in the century, however, give her greater authority by depicting her in furs, elaborate headdresses, and other fashions of contemporary high-born ladies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dress: Annual Journal of the Costume Society of America , 17., ( 1990):  Pages 104 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1990.

16. Record Number: 148
Author(s): Dufresne, Laura Rinaldi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan's "Treasure of the City of Ladies": A study of Dress and Social Hierarchy [in four illustrated manuscripts].
Source: Woman's Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR)16, 2 (Fall 1995/ Winter 1996): 29-34. Link Info
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17. Record Number: 32138
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Joan Skerne
Source:
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18. Record Number: 32142
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Anne Urswick
Source:
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19. Record Number: 32585
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Lady in Yellow
Source:
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20. Record Number: 36396
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret Williams
Source:
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21. Record Number: 37559
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Beatrice d'Este from the Pala Sforzesca (Sforza Altarpiece)
Source:
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22. Record Number: 37614
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Death and the old debutante (on the right)
Source:
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