Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


18 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 32153
Author(s): Falvay, Dávid.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Elizabeth's Roses in Italy: Texts and Images
Source: Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors.   Edited by Machtelt Israëls and Louis A. Waldman .   Villa i Tatti; Harvard University Press, 2013.  Pages 61 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 24107
Author(s): Casto, Oronzo
Contributor(s):
Title : Processo e canonizzazione di sant'Elisabetta d'Ungheria secondo i documenti ufficiali [On May 27, 1235, Elizabeth of Hungary was canonized by Pope Gregory IX. The process of canonization was unusually quick, with reports of miracles, personal testimonies to Elizabeth’s virtues, and political pressure as factors. The article includes Italian translations of documents from the process of canonization, including Gregory IX’s bull enrolling Elizabeth among the recognized saints. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 78., 1-2 ( 2008):  Pages 213 - 260.
Year of Publication: 2008.

3. Record Number: 20787
Author(s): Fleck, Cathleen A
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed the eyes that see those things you see: The Trecento Choir Frescoes at Santa Maria Donnaregina in Naples [Describes the events depicted in the fresco cycles of the monastery, and makes connections between the relationship of the nun's agency as viewer of the frescoes to her relationship with the male mendicant orders of the monastery. Also examines how the content of the frescoes alludes to increases in women's literacy in Naples during this period. Title note supplied by Femiane.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 67., ( 2004):  Pages 201 - 224.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 14639
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Golden Legend" and the Cycle of the "Life of Saint Elizabeth of Thuringia-Hungary" [The author briefly traces various lives of Saint Elizabeth as sources for the cycle of paintings in Santa Maria Donna Regina. Warr also argues that as patron Mary of Hungary was involved in the project's plans especially for those paintings that honored her great-aunt Elizabeth and celebrated the sanctity of the Arpád and Anjou lines. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Collectanea Franciscana , 78., 1-2 ( 2008):  Pages 155 - 174.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10834
Author(s): Peterson, Ingrid, O.S.F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thirteenth-Century Penitential Women: Franciscan Life in the Secular World
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 43 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 7253
Author(s): Gerát, Ivan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dei saturitas. St. Elizabeth's Works of Mercy in the Medieval Pictorial Narrative ["In this article, I examine a significant and unknown part of the pictorial tradition that surrounds St. Elizabeth in Central Europe and concentrate, in particular, on one group of scenes which can be generally referred to as her works of mercy. The significant questions of identity and differences within this group are analyzed. Some aspcts of these scenes changed very subtly; I evaluate these differences in relation to their historical context and consider how they reflected the development of liturgical and devotional practices. The main focus of this paper, however, is an evaluation of the theory that pictorial images of St. Elizabeth may be in imitation of those representing Christ." Page 168.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 168 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 4672
Author(s): Pasztor, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sant'Elisabetta d'Ungheia nella religiosità femminile del secolo XIII [Elizabeth of Hungary is known for both her charitable actions and her visions. The latter aspect of her life can be studied from the reports of her maid, Isentrude, to Conrad of Marburg. Both Elizabeth's charitable work and her emphasis on the humanity of Christ place her within the Franciscan tradition. Once widowed, Elizabeth embraced continence, but Conrad refused to permit her to become a mendicant].
Source: Donne e sante: Studi sulla religiosità femminile nel Medio Evo. Edith Pasztor .   Edizioni Studium, 2000. Mediaeval Studies , 62., ( 2000):  Pages 153 - 171. Earlier published in Studies in Church History 27 (1990): 53-78.
Year of Publication: 2000.

8. Record Number: 5583
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Saintly Scenarios in Christine de Pizan's "Livre des trois vertus" [The author argues that Christine chose saints (Balthild, Clotilda, Elizabeth of Hungary, and Louis IX) as exemplars who offered more than one possible way of life; the saints also provided guidance on how to meet political obligations while maintaining spiritual and charitable activities].
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 62., ( 2000):  Pages 255 - 292.
Year of Publication: 2000.

9. Record Number: 4717
Author(s): Bauer, Elizabeth Jensen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Women and the Care of the Sick: Some Evidence from Hagiography [the author argues that some qualities that women saints display in the care of the sick according to their "vitae" are different from those in men's lives, namely humility, strength (not only physical strength but an absence of revulsion and nausea before the physical conditions of lepers and other sick people), and penance by identifying with the suffering of others].
Source: Magistra , 5., 1 (Summer 1999):  Pages 79 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 4907
Author(s): Vauchez, André.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between Virginity and Spiritual Espousals: Models of Feminine Sainthood in the Christian West in the Middle Ages
Source: Medieval History Journal , 2., 2 (July-December 1999):  Pages 349 - 359.
Year of Publication: 1999.

11. Record Number: 2896
Author(s): Crossley, Paul.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architecture of Queenship: Royal Saints, Female Dynasties and the Spread of Gothic Architecture in Central Europe [traces the influence of St. Elisabeth's church in Marburg on architecture in central Europe].
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997. Magistra , 5., 1 (Summer 1999):  Pages 263 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1997.

12. Record Number: 2510
Author(s): Wiethaus, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminist Historiography as Pornography: St. Elisabeth of Thuringia in Nazi Germany
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 46 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1997.

13. Record Number: 476
Author(s): Petrakopoulos, Anja.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sanctity and Motherhood: Elizabeth of Thuringia
Source: Sanctity and Motherhood: Essays on Holy Mothers in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Anneke B. Mulder-Bakker Garland Medieval Casebooks, 14.   Garland Publishing, 1995. Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 259 - 296.
Year of Publication: 1995.

14. Record Number: 5022
Author(s): Klaniczay, Gábor
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cinderella Effect: Late Medieval Female Sainthood in Central Europe and in Italy [The author examines the ideal of sainthood represented by pious princesses in Central Europe and how this aristocratic and mendicant movement fared in Italy where urban female sainthood embraced all social classes].
Source: East Central Europe , 20., 1 ( 1993- 1996):  Pages 51 - 68. Special issue title: Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1993- 1996.

15. Record Number: 10249
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the King’s Daughter of Hungary [In her “Book,” English mystic Margery Kempe adapts the text of another woman visionary, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. Instances of devotional suffering, weeping, and self-martyrdom in Kempe’s book could be modeled on selected incidents in Elizabeth’s writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. East Central Europe , 20., 1 ( 1993- 1996):  Pages 189 - 201.
Year of Publication: 1992.

16. Record Number: 11072
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin and the Visionary in the Revelations of St. Elizabeth [The article argues that the "Revelations" commonly attributed to Elizabeth of Thuringia were in fact written by her obscure great-niece, Elizabeth of Toess; it examines the "Revelations" in order to consider more generally what they reveal about the nature of medieval women’s visionary writing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 125 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1991.

17. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Small Maesta
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):
Year of Publication:

18. Record Number: 32320
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St Elizabeth of Hungary clothing a beggar
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):
Year of Publication: