Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


11 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 15839
Author(s): Tomas, Natalie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Women Have a Space? [The author briefly surveys the kinds of activities in which Florentine women took part. Given the gendered expectations of fathers and husbands based on religious beliefs and concerns with family honor, young and married women from privileged families mostly stayed at home. But this situation is further complicated by palaces being used for politics and business. Furthermore marriages were part of family strategies, and mothers of brides and grooms often took an active role in the considerations. Women from powerful families like Lucrezia Tornabuoni of the Medici, used their patron-client relationships to help the deserving and promote their families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006.  Pages 311 - 328.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 9651
Author(s): Kuehn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Family Solidarity in Exile and in Law: Alberti Lawsuits of the Early Quattrocento [The author examines two legal cases brought by the Alberti family in the early fifteenth century. Various members of the family were exiled from Florence for plotting against the government. In some cases Alberti wives were left in Florence to manage wha
Source: Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 421 - 439.
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 9502
Author(s): Horodowich, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beyond Marriage and the Convent: Women, Class, and Honour in Renaissance Italy [Among the books discussed in this review essay are two medieval titles: Ann Crabb's "The Strozzi of Florence: Widowhood and Family Solidarity in the Renaissance" and Stanley Chojnacki's "Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 340 - 345.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 6746
Author(s): Seidel Menchi, Silvana.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Girl and the Hourglass: Periodization of Women's Lives in Western Preindustrial Societies [The author examines various models that were used to indicate the significant ages in men's and women's lives; in the latter half of the article, the author concentrates on medieval Italian child brides, using case studies, prescriptive literature, and l
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 41 - 74.
Year of Publication: 2001.

5. Record Number: 5774
Author(s): Bryce, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing for Strangers: Women, Dance, and Music in Quattrocento Florence
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 4.1 (Winter 2001): 1074-1107. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

6. Record Number: 5720
Author(s): Woods-Marsden, Joanna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of the Lady, 1430- 1520 [the author traces the development of the patrician female ideal; portrait forms evolved very rapidly from the profile that suggested self-control and inaccessibility to the intimate frontal pose; the author argues that the change was due in part to the influence of humanism with its emphasis on the individual and subjectivity].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 62 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2001.

7. Record Number: 5718
Author(s): Kent, Dale.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Renaissance Florence [the author gives a brief overview of the factors and attendant evidence that characterized the lives of Florentine noble women including marriage and the painted wedding chests (cassone), childbirth and the celebratory birth trays, clothing and sumptuary laws, religious devotion, and death].
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001.  Pages 24 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 6747
Author(s): Chojnacki, Stanley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Getting Back the Dowry: Venice, c. 1360-1530 [the author explores the dowry system for the elite in Venice; he is particularly interested in the relationships within natal and marital families both in terms of widows seeking dowry restitution and for husbands-to-be seeking ways to guarantee their brides' dowries; in both cases the dowry system made women active and vital participants in familial networks].
Source: Time, Space, and Women's Lives in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anne Jackson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, 57.   Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 77 - 96. Republished as Getting Back the Dowry. By Stanley Chojnacki. Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. Pages 95-111.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 3055
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing the Bridal Body in Fifteenth-Century Florence
Source: Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 182 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1998.

10. Record Number: 5653
Author(s): Nelson, Jonathan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Place of Women in Filippino Lippi's Nerli Altarpiece [the author argues that the donor portrait of Nanna, wife of Tanai de' Nerli, as well as the domestic scene in the background of husband, wife, and small child, were intended to enhance Tanai's role as husband and father; Nanna is not represented as an individual but as an ideal wife: modest, pious, and honorable].
Source: Italian History and Culture , 1., ( 1995):  Pages 65 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1995.

11. Record Number: 7173
Author(s): Higgins, Paula.
Contributor(s):
Title : Parisian Nobles, a Scottish Princess, and the Woman's Voice in Late Medieval Song [The author identifies two different women named Jacqueline de Hacqueville in fifteenth century Paris who may have been the woman referred to in Antoine Busnoy's songs. The author suggests that Jacqueline herself wrote two poems in response to Busnoys and may have actively participated in the musical culture of the court. The author more generally examines late medieval poetry written in a woman's voice and suggests that many anonymous poems may well have been the work of women. The appendices present the text and English translations of the Hacqueville songs, "Ja que lui ne si actende," "A vous sans autre me viens rendre," "Je ne puis vivre ainsi tousiours," and "A que ville est abhominable." Appendix Two lists the family members of Jacques de Hacquville according to a legal document from 1482.].
Source: Early Music History (Full Text via JSTOR) 10 (1991): 145-200. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.