Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


44 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 24050
Author(s): Smith, Kathryn A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Book, Body, and the Construction of Self in the Taymouth Hours [The author analyzes miniatures and bas de page illustrations in a book of hours made for an English royal woman in the 1330s. Smith finds evidence of models of appropriate devout behavior for the laity. The portrait of the book owner at prayer during mass shows her with hands extended and the book of hours at her side. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009.  Pages 173 - 204.
Year of Publication: 2009.

2. Record Number: 20730
Author(s): Mecham, June L
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages
Source: History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 448 - 480.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 14126
Author(s): Rudy, Kathryn M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Devotions at Court [The author briefly surveys the devotional activities of Margaret of York and her step-grandaughter Margaret of Austria. These included prayers and sacred objects related to fertility and childbirth, books for prayer, meditation, and teaching young childr
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 230 - 239.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 10827
Author(s): Hemptinne, Thérèse.de
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Writing, and Devotional Practices: Lay and Religious Women and the Written Word in the Low Countries (1350-1550) [The author argues in part that manuscripts in the vernacular served as a means of connection among female relatives and friends, both urban laywomen and those in religious life (Beguines as well as nuns). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10883
Author(s): Ziegler, Joanna E.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the Artistic Nature of Elisabeth of Spalbeek's Ecstasy: The Southern Low Countries Do Matter [The author argues that Elisabeth von Spalbeek should be considered an artist and that her reenactments of the passion can best be understood in visual terms as akin to theatrical performances. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 9719
Author(s): Mecham, June L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Between the Lines: Compilation, Variation, and the Recovery of an Authentic Female Voice in the "Dornenkron" Prayer Books from Wienhausen
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 29., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 109 - 128.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 9707
Author(s): Powell, Raymond A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe: An Exemplar of Late Medieval English Piety [The author argues that scholars for the most part have not put Margery Kempe within the context of late medieval English religious beliefs and practices. He suggests that Kempe was not religiously abnormal and that the themes in her book reflect contemporary religious concerns. Powell argues that people reacted badly to Kempe because she was annoying. Furthermore, Kempe was writing an account of her life as a saint, and persecution from her peers was part of her suffering. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Catholic Historical Review (Full Text via Project Muse) 89, 1 (January 2003): 1-23. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 8315
Author(s): Petersen, Zina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Authoritative Noise: Margery Kempe's Appropriation of Unique Ritual and Authority [The author argues that Margery Kempe's identity relied on her relationship with Christ and her ability to make this relationship concrete through private rituals. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Magistra , 8., 2 (Winter 2002):  Pages 84 - 118.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 6616
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beautiful Brides and Model Mothers: The Devotional and Talismanic Functions of Early Modern Marian Reliefs [The author discusses fifteenth century madonna and child reliefs in regard to their production, devotional uses, levels of contemplation evoked, and as magical objects for marriage and the procreation of male babies].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Magistra , 8., 2 (Winter 2002):  Pages 135 - 161.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 9512
Author(s): Wiethaus, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thieves and Carnivals: Gender in German Dominican Literature of the Fourteenth Century [The author examines two autobiographical vernacular texts from Margarete Ebner and Heinrich Seuse. She argues that Seuse was concerned in part with disciplining nuns under his care and showing that female spirituality was inferior to his more intellectual approach. Ebner, on the other hand, wrote a spiritual manual for the nuns in her house in order to enhance their daily practices. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Magistra , 8., 2 (Winter 2002):  Pages 209 - 238.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 6928
Author(s): Clark, Robert L. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Constructing the Female Subject in Late Medieval Devotion [The author analyzes a number of devotional manuals addressed to laywomen and argues that the practices therein advised (prayer, fasting, etc.) empowered women, giving them choices and some control over their everyday lives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Magistra , 8., 2 (Winter 2002):  Pages 160 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 6165
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Efter the Measse-Cos, Hwen the Preost Sacred: When is the Moment of Ecstasy in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author examines a passage in the "Ancrene Wisse" concerning the respect that the anchoress should show to the host and the presence of Christ].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 2001):  Pages 105 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 6929
Author(s): Rondeau, Jennifer Fisk.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conducting Gender: Theories and Practices in Italian Confraternity Literature [The author explores both confraternity statutes and "laude," vernacular hymns, for their uses of gender. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 2001):  Pages 183 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 8549
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affective Literacy: Gestures of Reading in the Later Middle Ages [The author uses "affective literacy" to mean the ways people develop emotional, gestural, and other physical relationships with texts. He argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" regulated its readers' devotional, physical, and affective behaviors. Transgressive literacy, in which readers touched or kissed images, gave them a relationship with sacred texts which came close to that of clerics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies: Proceeding of the Illinois Medieval Association (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 83-110 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 5465
Author(s): Renevey, Denis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery's Performing Body: The Translation of Late Medieval Discursive Religious Practices
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 197 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 5457
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Book of Hours [the author argues that the instructions for devotions in the "Ancrene Wisse" represent a middle stage between monastic practice and the Book of Hours, the "breviary for the use of the laity;" the Appendix reproduces an excerpt from the "Ancrene Wisse" and from the early Dominican Constitution dealing with the instructions for saying Matins].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 21 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 4381
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Candlemas Vision and Marie d'Oignies's Role in Its Dissemination [the author explores the visions associated with Candlemas, the Feast day commemorating the presentation of the infant Jesus in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary, in the writings associated with Gertrude the Great, Mechthild of Hackeborn, Angela of Foligno, Henry Suso, Bridget of Sweden, and Margery Kempe].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999.  Pages 195 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1999.

19. Record Number: 4377
Author(s): Galloway, Penny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Neither Miraculous Nor Astonishing: The Devotional Practice of Beguine Communities in French-Flanders
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999.  Pages 107 - 127.
Year of Publication: 1999.

20. Record Number: 4395
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bridget of Sweden, Margery Kempe, and Women's Jerusalem Pilgrimages in the Middle Ages [The author argues that there were unique motivations for women's pilgrimage to Jerusalem; because of their devotion to the humanity of Christ, they wanted to relive his sufferings in the places where it had happened.]
Source: Mediterranean Historical Review , 14., 1 (June 1999):  Pages 44 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1999.

21. Record Number: 5696
Author(s): Stones, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nipples, Entrails, Severed Heads, and Skin: Devotional Images for Madame Marie [the author argues that the Marie for whom Ms. 16251 was created was the noble woman Marie de Rethel who in 1266 became the third wife of Wautier d'Enghien; the author suggests that the many scenes of torture and death in the illustrations of Bible stories and saints' lives were intended to remind the viewer of Marie's roles as mother and wife].
Source: Image and Belief: Studies in Celebration of the Eightieth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 1999. Mediterranean Historical Review , 14., 1 (June 1999):  Pages 47 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 4405
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Conditions of Confession [the author traces the development of the conditions of confession in the twelfth century in order to evaluate its presentation in the "Ancrene Wisse;" she concludes that the "Ancrene Wisse"'s uniqueness is to be found in its expansion of the conditions of confession with non-scriptural "exempla" and other borrowings].
Source: English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 193 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 3564
Author(s): Weed, Stanley E.
Contributor(s):
Title : My Sister, Bride, and Mother: Aspects of Female Piety in Some Images of the "Virgo Inter Virgines" [The author argues that art representing the Virgin among virgins carried multiple layers of symbolism; the art work examined was produced for an audience of nuns].
Source: Magistra , 4., 1 (Summer 1998):  Pages 3 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1998.

24. Record Number: 4597
Author(s): Visconsi, Elliott.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Represents the Person of Our Lord: The Performance of Mysticism in the "Vita" of Elisabeth of Spalbeek and "The Book of Margery Kempe" [this essay describes "how medieval women produced a mysticism beyond extant gender representations, a performative mysticism firmly grounded in the disorderliness of the female flesh as it enacts the 'imitatio Christi,' predicated on an educable audience, and finally to result in a subjectivity of self-annihilation" (Page 79)].
Source: Comitatus , 28., ( 1997):  Pages 76 - 89.
Year of Publication: 1997.

25. Record Number: 10242
Author(s): Mahoney, Dhira B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe’s Tears and the Power Over Language [Margery’s tears play a significant role in her attempt to define herself and her role in society. She communicates her unique status to others through her tears. Weeping marks her as a woman who is both of the world while remaining apart from it, and she demonstrates her power outside of language by means of her tears and prayers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Comitatus , 28., ( 1997):  Pages 37 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1992.

26. Record Number: 10224
Author(s): Cassidy, Brendan
Contributor(s):
Title : Orcagna’s Tabernacle in Florence: Design and Function [In the mid-fourteenth century, Andrea Orcagna was commissioned to design a new shrine to house an image of the Madonna in the Church of Orsanmichele in Florence. The author describes the original appearance of the shrine and the devotional purposes it served, as well as the shrine’s relationship to an earlier tabernacle that stood in Orsanmichele. The shrine provided a focus for devotion to the Virgin, and although it was not originally designed for celebration of the Mass, it was at some point converted to include an altar for that purpose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 180 - 211.
Year of Publication: 1992.

27. Record Number: 14682
Author(s): Smith, Jeffrey Chipps.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret of York and the Burgundian Portrait Tradition [The author surveys nine surviving manuscript paintings of Margaret, arguing that she was the first Burgundian duchess to develop an individualized image. Her representations emphasize her devotional piety and charity but also take motifs from ducal portraits. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margaret of York, Simon Marmion, and "The Visions of Tondal": Papers Delivered at a Symposium organized by the Department of Manuscripts of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Collaboration with the Huntington Library and Art Collections, June 21-24, 1990.   Edited by Thomas Kren .   J. Paul Getty Museum, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 47 - 56.
Year of Publication: 1992.

28. Record Number: 10243
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Journey into Selfhood: Margery Kempe and Feminine Spirituality [The author reads Margery’s narrative of spiritual progression alongside feminist, psychological and theological accounts of how women achieve selfhood. This process involves self-negation, spiritual awakening, and self-naming. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Comitatus , 28., ( 1997):  Pages 51 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1992.

29. Record Number: 9461
Author(s): Orsten, Elisabeth M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Madame Eglentyne in Her Day and in Ours: Anti-Semitism in "The Prioress’s Tale" and a Modern Parallel [The author assesses twentieth-century scholarship on Chaucer’s Prioress and the controversy over whether the character is anti-Semitic (she tells a story about a little boy killed by Jews). Although one might see the Prioress as anti-Semitic according to our modern post-Holocaust perspective, it is ultimately unknowable whether Chaucer shared her views. The author finds a modern parallel to “The Prioress’s Tale” in the story of a shrine in Rinn, Austria (dedicated to a boy supposedly killed by Jewish merchants in 1462); its cult following endured through the late twentieth-century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 82 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1992.

30. Record Number: 10241
Author(s): Armstrong, Elizabeth Psakis.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Understanding by Feeling” in Margery Kempe’s Book [When Kempe’s writing is compared to the various devotional writers she mentions in her book (Richard Rolle, Julian of Norwich, Walter Hilton, Saints Bridget of Sweden and Catherine of Siena), it is clear that she borrows from both devotional and hagiographical traditions. She combines these traditions with other discourses in order to triumph over clerical authority and to enact her own new spirituality based on feeling. The author suggests that her religious practices are close to those of Protestants in later periods (including Pentecostal women). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 17 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1992.

31. Record Number: 10250
Author(s): Holloway, Julia Bolton.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride, Margery, Julian, and Alice: Bridget of Sweden’s Textual Community in Medieval England [Kempe models her devotional practices on Saint Bridget of Sweden, replicating the saint’s writings, life, and pilgrimages through her own book and travels. In her pilgrimages, Kempe visited the same sites Bridget did in her lifetime. Pilgrimage was available to both men and women, and writing a text enabled women to gain some access to power by narrating their travels. The author traces the lives, texts, and travels of historical figures like Saint Bridget of Sweden and Julian of Norwich, as well as Dame Alison (Chaucer’s fictional Wife of Bath). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 203 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1992.

32. Record Number: 10249
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the King’s Daughter of Hungary [In her “Book,” English mystic Margery Kempe adapts the text of another woman visionary, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. Instances of devotional suffering, weeping, and self-martyrdom in Kempe’s book could be modeled on selected incidents in Elizabeth’s writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 189 - 201.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 10993
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Texts and Images of Marian Devotion in Thirteenth-Century England [Many lay practices focused on the Virgin Mary developed in the thirteenth century. They required a basic knowledge of Latin to read books of hours. Many of the most popular ideas, such as Mary the intercessor, were found in art. Much of thirteenth century Marian art from England has been lost; but illuminated manuscripts employ the most common motifs, including Mary pleading bare-breasted for sinful humanity. The Appendix presents Middle English language texts of Marian antiphons, hymns, and prayers of the Sarum Hours from an early fifteenth century manuscript of "The Prymer or Lay Folks' Prayer Book." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England in the Thirteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1989 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by W.M. Ormrod Harlaxton Medieval Studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 69 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1991.

34. Record Number: 10891
Author(s): Hunt, Lucy-Anne
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman’s Prayer to Saint Sergios in Latin Syria: Interpreting a Thirteenth-century Icon at Mount Sinai [The icons at Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mount Sinai include one depicting a black-veiled woman keeling in prayer before an equestrian Saint Sergios. The symbolic significance of the woman’s black veil is unknown, but the painting may indicate the imp
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 15., ( 1991):  Pages 96 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1991.

35. Record Number: 12736
Author(s): Takacs, Sarolta A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Manuel Philes’ Meditation on an Icon of the Virgin Mary [This devotional poem by the fourteenth century Greek poet represents a progression from a meditation of a concrete object (an icon of the Virgin Mary) to a mystical or metaphysical plane of understanding. The author gives a line by line analysis of the language of the poem, which employs numerous rhetorical devices to connect allusions to the burning bush (which typographically prefigures the Virgin Mary) to imagery of divine fire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 15., ( 1990):  Pages 277 - 288.
Year of Publication: 1990.

36. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

37. Record Number: 12754
Author(s): Lewis, Suzanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Apocalypse of Isabella of France: Paris, Bibl. Nat. MS Fr. 13096. The Appendix outlines the picture cycle and text of the manuscript, listing the text (by chapter and verse number) and subject matter of images on each folio [Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):  Pages 224 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1990.

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Title : Lactation of St. Bernard
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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39. Record Number:
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Title : St. Bernadino Preaching in the Campo
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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40. Record Number: 32129
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Contributor(s):
Title : Reliquary of the Hand of Saint Marina
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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41. Record Number: 32584
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Contributor(s):
Title : Temple girls of Maabar offer food to the idol to whom they are consecrated
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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42. Record Number: 34457
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Title : Marie and other pilgrims with St. James
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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43. Record Number: 37534
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Contributor(s):
Title : Vision of St Bernard
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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44. Record Number: 37664
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Contributor(s):
Title : Mary of Burgundy reading from a book of hours
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):
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