Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


24 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27568
Author(s): Stanford, Charlotte A. ,
Contributor(s):
Title : Donations from the Body for the Soul: Apparel, Devotion, and Status in Late Medieval Strasbourg [The author analyzes evidence of lay people’s contributions to the building and services of Strasbourg’s cathedral as recorded in the “Book of Donors” from the early fourteenth century to 1521. Many people contributed clothing and related items, both for resale and for use in liturgical services. Stanford notes women’s participation as donors and the varieties of women’s clothing and ornaments given as gifts. She underlines the personal nature of many women’s gifts including elaborate linens decorated with gold and silk destined for the Virgin’s chapel. The appendices include a glossary of apparel-related terms in the “Book of Donors” both in Latin and in German (pages 199-205). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 173 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 24047
Author(s): Wells, Scott
Contributor(s):
Title : The Politics of Gender and Ethnicity in East Francia: The Case of Gandersheim, ca. 850-950 [The author argues that the women’s community at the monastery of Gandersheim was important because it conveyed multiple meanings for the Liudolfing-Saxon dynasty during a period of shifting familial and ethnic politics. During this time variations in royal support coincided with the monastery’s success or failure at articulating the ruling dynasty’s political identity. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 113 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2009.

3. Record Number: 11758
Author(s): Heller, Ena Giurescu.
Contributor(s):
Title : Access to Salvation: The Place (and Space) of Women Patrons in Fourteenth-century Florence [The author provides a case study of Monna Andrea Acciaiuoli's patronage of her husband's family chapel in Santa Maria Novella. She commissioned the glass windows and the altarpiece. Heller raises the question of whether Monna Andrea and other female patrons had access to these family chapels beyond the rood screen. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 161 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 11961
Author(s): Wood, Charles T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fontevraud, Dynasticism, and Eleanor of Aquitaine
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 377 - 405.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 13673
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn
Contributor(s):
Title : Dead to the World? Death and the Maiden Revisited in Medieval Women's Convent Culture [This essay looks at letters and biographies in the convents of Heloise and her English and French colleagues against the social and cultural history of medieval death. Rejecting stereotypes of nuns as immured from the world in the gothic embrace of a grave, the essay explores a living culture of death in which women interceded on behalf of themselves and others, organized their cultural traditions, shaped institutional memory, and dealt with the administrative, practical, and symbolic aspects of nunnery cemeteries. Equipping women for the work of commemoration and communion with the dead was to equip them with the means of self-conscious shaping of their own and others’ lives and spiritualities. Abstract submitted to Feminae by the author.]
Source: Guidance for Women in Twelfth-Century Convents.   Edited by Translated by Vera Morton with an interpretive essay by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Library of Medieval Women .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 157 - 180.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 11960
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen's Choice: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Tombs at Fontevraud [The tombs Eleanor of Aquitaine commissioned for Henry II, Richard I, and herself at Fontevrault, with their life-like images of royalty, were novel in their day. Eleanor was probably not inspired by royal tombs she saw on her travels, although Capetian queens' tombs had incised images. Eleanor's own tomb showed her as a living person, whereas the others were shown lying in state. It appears that Eleanor took charge of all these commemorations of the Plantagenet dead. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 377 - 405.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 8085
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Naming a Nun: Spiritual Exemplars and Corporate Identity in Florentine Convents, 1450-1530 [A newly professed nun frequently took a new name to mark her separation from the world and integration into a monastic community. This practice only slowly became common, especially for older girls entering monasteries. By the end of the fifteenth century, the practice, once sporadic, had become the norm. Names with classical or literary resonances were among those most frequently changed to more pious ones. Communities controlled their own naming practices, recycling the names of respected sisters for generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 215 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 8055
Author(s): Sheerin, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisters in the Literary Agon: Texts from Communities of Women on the Mortuary Roll of the Abbess Matilda of La Trinité, Caen [The author provides a brief introduction to the mortuary roll for Matilda, abbess of la Trinité monastery in Caen. Mortuary rolls announced the deaths of prominent religious women and men and provided space for monasteries and cathedrals to record prayers and commemorative poems. The author suggests that groups competed for the most elegant and rhetorically inventive entries. He also suggests that poems written by nuns may have prompted the misogynous comments in several of the entries from male religious communities. Latin texts and English translations follow of Matilda's obituary notice and the poems on the mortuary roll from women's communities. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 93 - 131.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 16595
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E. and Kelley M. Wickham-Crowley
Contributor(s):
Title : Last (w)Rites and Material Girls: Death, Memory, and Anglo-Saxon Women
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 10210
Author(s): Talbot, Alice-Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Building Activity in Constantinople under Andronikos II: The Role of Women Patrons in the Construction and Restoration of Monasteries [The author notes the substantial number of both female patrons and women's monasteries during this period. The patrons are connected to the royal family by blood or marriage. Individuals profiled include Theodora Raoulaina, Maria Palaiologina, Theodora Synadene, Irene Choumnaina Palaiologina, and Maria Doukaina Komnene Branaina Palaiologina. The women were all widows at the time of their donations and gave substantial gifts for a monastery to which they could retire and where they could bury their family members. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine Constantinople: Monuments, Topography, and Everyday Life.   Edited by Nevra Necipoglu. The Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies, and Cultures, 400-1453, Volume 33 Medieval Mediterranean, 33.   Brill, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 329 - 343.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 12685
Author(s): Wareham, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Transformation of Kinship and the Family in Late Anglo-Saxon England
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 10., 3 ( 2001):  Pages 375 - 399.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 5782
Author(s): Innes, Matthew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Keeping It in the Family: Women and Aristocratic Memory, 700- 1200
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 17 - 35.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 5787
Author(s): Walker, Rose.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Royal and Aristocratic Burial in Northern Spain, c. 950- c. 1250 [the author points out that the most successful efforts toward "memoria" were made by a united and strong royal couple and put into the hands of a female foundation; the two outstanding examples of royal pantheons are San Isidoro at León (built by King Fernando I and Queen Sancha with the subsequent support of their daughter Urraca) and Las Huelgas (built by King Alfonso VIII and Queen Eleanor)].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 150 - 172.
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 5781
Author(s): van Houts, Elisabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Medieval Memories [the author provides a brief overview of the themes explored in the book's essays; she considers the ways that gender informed the writing of history and the remembrance of the dead within the contexts of the aristocracy, authority, family, rites for the dead, prophecy of the future, and memory in art].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 5360
Author(s): Connor, Carolyn L.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Sense of Family: Monastic Portraits in the Lincoln College Typikon
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 107 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 2887
Author(s): Jäschke, Kurt-Ulrich.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Famous Empresses to Unspectacular Queens: The Romano-German Empire to Margaret of Brabant, Countess of Luxemburg and Queen of the Romans (d. 1311) [the appendices discuss Habsburg burials at Gaming, Vienna, and Stams; Appendix Two lists the empresses and queens in the Romano-German empire to 1324.].
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 75 - 108.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 16624
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen
Contributor(s):
Title : Mourning Rites, Memory, and Civilization in Premodern Italy [Diane Owen-Hughes argues that women's active role in mourning was a longstanding tradition of the Mediterranean and was frequently accomodated by Church officials. In late medieval Italy civic authorities acted to marginalize women's involvement by legislating their behavior, the kinds of mourning garb they could wear, and, in many cases, preventing even close female relatives from attending the funeral mass and burial. A male commemoration was given preference instead with men's funerary oratory and the new movement torward constructing elaborate tombs. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 23 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1994.

18. Record Number: 10225
Author(s): King, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-style [Women were able to commission art and architecture in fourteenth and fifteenth century Italy in a variety of ways, even if their involvement in the production of images and construction of buildings wasn’t as widespread as men’s. For instance, wealthy widows could control the making of large, public images such as funerary altarpieces, while nuns could commission artwork and buildings through convent endowments. Through their acts of patronage, these “matrons” challenged conventional expectations that women inhabit a small, private sphere. The author also analyzes how women chose to represent themselves visually within the works they commissioned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 372 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1992.

19. Record Number: 10729
Author(s): Coldstream, Nicola.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Commissioning and Design of the Eleanor Crosses [The author argues that Edward I’s extravagant mourning of Eleanor, epitomized by the commissioning of the Eleanor Crosses, intended to demonstrate the splendor of royalty. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 55 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1991.

20. Record Number: 10727
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: The Eleanor Crosses and Royal Burial Customs [The author shows that Edward I’s decisions regarding Eleanor’s remains drew on a number of funerary practices that had developed in France and England during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 9 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1991.

21. Record Number: 10730
Author(s): Lindley, Phillip.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sculptural Memorials of Queen Eleanor and their Context [The author shows that the vertical, multiplied images of Eleanor on her memorials and tomb effigies in effect elide secular and ecclesiastical iconography, and make her appear saintly. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 69 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1991.

22. Record Number: 28721
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Profile of a Woman
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

23. Record Number: 28729
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Giovanna Tornabuoni
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

24. Record Number: 31184
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Panel from the Humility Polyptych - The translation of the body of Humility on 6 June 1311
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):
Year of Publication: