Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


14 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 11425
Author(s): Besserman, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer, Spain, and the Prioress's Antisemitism
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 329 - 353.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 4276
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Rosaries: Virginity, Violence, and Desire in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale"
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 181 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1999.

3. Record Number: 4438
Author(s): Boenig, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alma Redemptoris Mater, "Gaude Maria," and The Prioress's Tale [The author describes the difficulty of "Gaude Maria" and suggests that Chaucer chose "Alma Redemptoris Mater" instead because it is much easier to sing and emphasizes the clergeon's young age and vulnerability].
Source: Notes and Queries , 3 (September 1999):  Pages 321 - 326.
Year of Publication: 1999.

4. Record Number: 3964
Author(s): Gaynor, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : He Says, She Says: Subjectivity and the Discourse of the Other in the "Prioress's Portrait" and "Tale"
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 375 - 390.
Year of Publication: 1999.

5. Record Number: 11864
Author(s): Dutton, Marsha L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Two Nuns [The author argues that Chaucer presents the Second Nun as a positive figure in contrast to the Prioress who is verbally and intellectually incompetent. The Prioress mistranslates Latin and tells a tale of vengeance that subordinates Christ to both Mary and the martyrs. The Second Nun instead emphasizes God's love and grace. Her Saint Cecilia is not an innocent victim because she chooses to follow Christ, knowing that the risks are worth eternal life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Monasteries and society in medieval Britain: proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by Benjamin Thompson Harlaxton medieval studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1999. Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 296 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1999.

6. Record Number: 945
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Possible Unity of Chaucer's Prioresses [argues that the prioress of the "Prologue" is a pretentious bourgeoise, while the prioress narrator worships the image of a divine child but has no love for humanity].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 3., ( 1996):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1996.

7. Record Number: 1469
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Voice for the Prioress: The Context of English Devotional Prose [analyzes stylistic features that echo the colloquial and affective elements in devotional literature written for women religious as well as common rhetorical practices like repetition and opposition].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 18., ( 1996):  Pages 25 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

8. Record Number: 1582
Author(s): Marvin, Corey J.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Will Thee Not Forsake: The Kristevan Maternal Space in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale" and John of Garland's "Stella maris"
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 35 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

9. Record Number: 4828
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "New Rachel" and the Theological Roots of Medieval Anti-Semitism [The author analyzes Chaucer's use of Rachel weeping in the Prioress's tale; the author is not able to say conclusively that Chaucer was satirizing antisemitism].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 77., 3 (Autumn 1995):  Pages 9 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1995.

10. Record Number: 9542
Author(s): Alexander, Philip S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Madame Eglentyne, Geoffrey Chaucer and the Problem of Medieval Anti-Semitism [The author argues that Chaucer’s Prioress’s Tale is unquestionably antisemitic in nature. Although many literary critics have tried to defend Chaucer against antisemitism by pointing to his highly ironic portrayal of the tale’s narrator (the Prioress), Chaucer ultimately reflects the biases of his contemporaries. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 74., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 109 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1992.

11. Record Number: 9461
Author(s): Orsten, Elisabeth M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Madame Eglentyne in Her Day and in Ours: Anti-Semitism in "The Prioress’s Tale" and a Modern Parallel [The author assesses twentieth-century scholarship on Chaucer’s Prioress and the controversy over whether the character is anti-Semitic (she tells a story about a little boy killed by Jews). Although one might see the Prioress as anti-Semitic according to our modern post-Holocaust perspective, it is ultimately unknowable whether Chaucer shared her views. The author finds a modern parallel to “The Prioress’s Tale” in the story of a shrine in Rinn, Austria (dedicated to a boy supposedly killed by Jewish merchants in 1462); its cult following endured through the late twentieth-century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 82 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1992.

12. Record Number: 7413
Author(s): Hahn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Performance of Gender in the Prioress [The author argues that Chaucer's Prioress both wears a kind of "mask of womanliness," and also identifies herself with a predominantly masculine Christian community by performing femininity. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 1., ( 1992):  Pages 111 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1992.

13. Record Number: 9543
Author(s): Frank, Hardy Long.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing the Prioress Whole [While many literary critics seek to psychoanalyze Chaucer’s Prioress, a more productive way to understand her is to examine the role of prioresses in fourteenth-century England. Prioresses were well-respected; they oversaw the daily activities of convents, entertained travelers of all classes, and traveled frequently on business trips. Rather than being childlike, sentimental, or naive, the Prioress is a capable professional woman who deserves respect. The Prioress’s Marian tale is also well-suited to her vocation and may perhaps refer to Chaucer’s own associations with the cult of Notre Dame du Puy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 25., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 229 - 237.
Year of Publication: 1991.

14. Record Number: 12864
Author(s): Dane, Joseph A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Prioress and Her Romanzen [The author demonstrates that the standard critical view of the Prioress as a romance heroine was invented by twentieth-century Chaucerians. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 24., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 219 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1990.