Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


164 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 12607
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Uncovering Griselda: Christine de Pizan, “un seule chemise,” and the Clerical Tradition: Boccaccio, Petrarch, Philippe de Mézières and the Ménagier de Paris [Christine’s sparse and forceful retelling of the story of patient Griselda in “La Cité des Dames” corrects the clerical tradition that informed previous versions of the story. While male writers like Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Chaucer frame the Griselda story with interpretive commentary, Christine strips the story of embellishment in order to focus attention on Griselda’s eloquence and her suffering at the will of her cruel husband. Just as Griselda is clothed and unclothed as she shifts in status within the story, so is the Griselda narrative itself rhetorically unclothed as Christine retells it. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 11425
Author(s): Besserman, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer, Spain, and the Prioress's Antisemitism
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 329 - 353.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 11024
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale": Interrogating "Virtue" through Violence [The author argues that the tale of Griselda should not be read as an allegory of humanity's relationship to God but as Chaucer's critique of hagiography's docile, virtuous heroines. Bodden cites the Envoy as clear evidence of Chaucer's condemnation of violence and in particular the torture of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 216 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 10453
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Disordered Grief and Fashionable Afflictions in Chaucer's "Franklin's Tale" and the "Clerk's Tale" [The author examines the gendered treatment of grief. Dorigen's expressions are extremely anguished and disordered, while the male characters experience grief more "rationally" in connection with honor and the loss of power over women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 51 - 63.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 8077
Author(s): Salisbury, Eve.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Wife," the Law, and the Middle English Breton Lays [The author argues that Chaucer's Wife and the Breton lays address legal questions and loopholes concerning rape and marriage, commenting on and reinforcing the laws of both ecclesiastical and secular counts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002.  Pages 73 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 10458
Author(s): Sanok, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing Feminine Sanctity in Later Medieval England: Parish Guilds, Saints' Plays, and the "Second Nun's Tale" [The author signals the "oppositional potential" of plays, pageants, and Chaucer's dramatic recounting of the lives of female martyrs. Seeing women, who are normally excluded from authority, portrayed as preaching and teaching (without any suggestion of heterodoxy) must have made civic and ecclesiastical officials nervous. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 269-303. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 11037
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monstrous (M)othering: The Representation of the Sowdanesse in Chaucer's "Man of Law Tale"
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002.  Pages 196 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 8079
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reframing the Violence of the Father: Reverse Oedipal Fantasies in Chaucer's Clerk's, Man of Law's, and Prioress's Tales [The author argues that the family relations both in the tales of Griselda and of Custance manifest a profound anxiety about paternity and a need for concealed violence, both physical and psychic. The happy endings do not mask the father's violence and the conflict between the generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002.  Pages 122 - 138.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 6043
Author(s): Patterson, Lee.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Pardoner on the Couch: Psyche and Clio in Medieval Literary Studies [the author argues that psycholanalytic theory has been abandoned by psychology and medicine while at the same time medieval literary historians have adopted it with great enthusiasm; the author takes the "Pardoner's Prologue" and "Tale" as a case study and suggests that the castration and homosexuality frequently seen as the key elements in the Pardoner's character were intended by Chaucer to be read metaphorically as indications of the Pardoner's barrenness and false religious beliefs].
Source: Speculum , 76., 3 (July 2001):  Pages 638 - 680.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 7909
Author(s): Bott, Robin L.
Contributor(s):
Title : O, Keep Me from Their Worse Than Killing Lust: Ideologies of Rape and Mutilation in Chaucer's "Physician's Tale" and Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 189 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 7903
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Chaucer Reading Rape
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 21 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 5981
Author(s): Weckström, Mari Pakkala.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Rise and Fall of the Faithful Wife: Chaucer's Griselda and Dorigen Seen Through Dialogue
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 5605
Author(s): Mann, Jill.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wife-Swapping in Medieval Literature [in order to understand better the relationships among Dorigen, Arveragus, and Aurelius, the author considers the exchange of wives between friends in a number of earlier medieval texts, including the Latin poem "Lantfrid and Cobbo," the many versions of "Amis and Amiloun," the thirteenth-century romance "Athis and Prophilias," Boccaccio's story in the "Decameron" concerning Titus and Gisippus, the story of Rollo and Resus in Walter Map's "De Nugis Curialium," and Giovanni Fiorentino's story of Stricca and Galgano in his fourteenth-century collection "Il Pecorone"].
Source: Viator , 32., ( 2001):  Pages 93 - 112.
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 5976
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Damned Dowagers: The Representation of the Queen Mothers in Chaucer's "Man of Law's Tale"
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Viator , 32., ( 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 6086
Author(s): Niebrzydowski, Sue.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sultana and Her Sisters: Black Women in the British Isles Before 1530
Source: Women's History Review , 10., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 187 - 210.
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 5492
Author(s): Mehl, Dieter.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lover's Complaint: Shakespeare and Chaucer [The author argues that Shakespeare was influenced by Chaucer's "Squire's Tale" when writing his poem, "A Lover's Complaint"; in both the abandoned woman bemoans her fate but the authors hold back from identifying with her so that the accused male seems l
Source: Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 237., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 133 - 138.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 5300
Author(s): Myers, Jeffrey Rayner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Pardoner as Female Eunuch [The author argues that the Pardoner is not a homosexual or a eunuch but a cross dressing woman who supports the Wife of Bath's defense of women and may have a heterosexual relationship with the Summoner].
Source: Studia Neophilologica , 72., ( 2000):  Pages 54 - 62.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 4810
Author(s): Collette, Carolyn P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and the French Tradition Revisited: Philippe de Mézières and the Good Wife ["Philippe de Mézières' book on marriage and good wives shows that even before Christine de Pizan, an exact contemporary of Chaucer's dealt with the idea of marriage and the good woman in terms and stories that indicated the public nature of the marriage bond, and, within that bond, the power of women to stabilize and destabilize elements of society through virtue and through uncontrolled will." (Page 167)].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Studia Neophilologica , 72., ( 2000):  Pages 151 - 168.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 4508
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale" [The author compares the three versions of Griselda's tale; he argues that the differences are not as great as critics have maintained with Chaucer deriving more from Boccaccio than was previously believed].
Source: Studies in Philology , 97., 3 (Summer 2000):  Pages 255 - 275.
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 4686
Author(s): Marchand, James W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Quoniam, Wife of Bath's Prologue D. 608 [The author cites several humorous uses of "quoniam" for vagina in Latin, French, Spanish, and Provençal texts].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 43 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1999.

21. Record Number: 4275
Author(s): Prior, Sandra Pierson.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginity and Sacrifice in Chaucer's "Physician's Tale"
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 165 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 3734
Author(s): Storm, Mel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Speech, Circumspection, and Orthodontics in the "Manciple's Prologue" and "Tale" and the Wife of Bath's Portrait
Source: Studies in Philology , 96., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 109 - 126.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 4688
Author(s): Puhvel, Martin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's Tale: Mirror of Her Mind [the author argues that the tale of the loathly lady and the knight who needs to learn about women reflects the wish fulfillment of the Wife of Bath, specifically in her need to dominate men, desire for uninhibited sex, and concerns about aging and ugliness].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 291 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 3652
Author(s): Bullough, Vern L. and Gwen Whitehead Brewer
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Masculinities and Modern Interpretations: The Problem of the Pardoner
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 237., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 93 - 110.
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 4210
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's "Prologue," LL. 328-336, and Boccaccio's "Decameron"
Source: Neophilologus , 83., 2 (April 1999):  Pages 313 - 316.
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 4276
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Rosaries: Virginity, Violence, and Desire in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale"
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Neophilologus , 83., 2 (April 1999):  Pages 181 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1999.

27. Record Number: 4438
Author(s): Boenig, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alma Redemptoris Mater, "Gaude Maria," and The Prioress's Tale [The author describes the difficulty of "Gaude Maria" and suggests that Chaucer chose "Alma Redemptoris Mater" instead because it is much easier to sing and emphasizes the clergeon's young age and vulnerability].
Source: Notes and Queries , 3 (September 1999):  Pages 321 - 326.
Year of Publication: 1999.

28. Record Number: 5297
Author(s): Jacobs, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Extra-Marital Contracts in the "Canterbury Tales" [The author argues that Chaucer's lovers delay consummation and pledge a contractual, legalistic promise to one another in imitation of marriage and courtship practices].
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 25 - 33.
Year of Publication: 1999.

29. Record Number: 3964
Author(s): Gaynor, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : He Says, She Says: Subjectivity and the Discourse of the Other in the "Prioress's Portrait" and "Tale"
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 375 - 390.
Year of Publication: 1999.

30. Record Number: 11864
Author(s): Dutton, Marsha L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Two Nuns [The author argues that Chaucer presents the Second Nun as a positive figure in contrast to the Prioress who is verbally and intellectually incompetent. The Prioress mistranslates Latin and tells a tale of vengeance that subordinates Christ to both Mary and the martyrs. The Second Nun instead emphasizes God's love and grace. Her Saint Cecilia is not an innocent victim because she chooses to follow Christ, knowing that the risks are worth eternal life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Monasteries and society in medieval Britain: proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by Benjamin Thompson Harlaxton medieval studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1999. Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 296 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1999.

31. Record Number: 5238
Author(s): Englade, Emilio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Straw for Youre Gentillesse: Masculine Identity, Honor, and Dorigen
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 5., ( 1998):  Pages 34 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1998.

32. Record Number: 4296
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Jewish Mother-in-Law: Synagoga and the "Man of Law's Tale" [The author suggests that Custance's mothers-in-law bring to mind Hildegard's figure of Synagoga].
Source: Hildegard of Bingen: A book of Essays.   Edited by Maud Burnett McInerney .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 191 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1998.

33. Record Number: 3782
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Povre Widwe" in the "Nun's Priest's Tale" and Boccaccio's "Decameron" [the poor widow's spare, modest, and healthy way of life is contrasted with the corrupt clergy].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 99., 3 ( 1998):  Pages 269 - 273.
Year of Publication: 1998.

34. Record Number: 3206
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Quiting Eve: Violence Against Women in the "Canterbury Tales"
Source: Violence Against Women in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Anna Roberts .   University Press of Florida, 1998. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 99., 3 ( 1998):  Pages 115 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1998.

35. Record Number: 3107
Author(s): Landman, James H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Laws of Community, Margery Kempe, and the "Canon's Yeoman's Tale"
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 2 (Spring 1998):  Pages 389 - 425.
Year of Publication: 1998.

36. Record Number: 8497
Author(s): Scala, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : John Matthews Manly (1865-1940) Edith Rickert (1871-1938) [Rickerts collaborated with Manly in the ambitious project of editing the "Canterbury Tales" in eight volumes. While Manly acknowledged Rickert's talents and hard work, she was very quickly erased from the scholarly record. Title note supplied by Feminae.
Source: Medieval Scholarship: Biographical Studies on the Formation of a Discipline. Volume 2: Literature and Philology.   Edited by Helen Damico with Donald Fennema and Karmen Lenz Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 1350.   Garland Publishing, 1998. Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 2 (Spring 1998):  Pages 297 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1998.

37. Record Number: 5433
Author(s): Baker, Joan and Susan Signe Morrison
Contributor(s):
Title : The Luxury of Gender: "Piers Plowman" and "The Merchant's Tale" ["We do not wish to suggest from our reading of these texts that Langland is indifferent to the gender concern Chaucer delightedly and delightfully explores. On the contrary, we regardLangland's relentless search for Truth throughout his poem as evidence that he would be uneasy at the very least about offering a painless placebo, a quick fix, for the problems of gender. We conclude our study, therefore, with a close look at some differences in the versions of "Piers Plowman" to assert that Langland was, indeed, not only aware of, but deeply concerned with such issues, particularly those concerning a gendered readership of his text. And this, we contend, makes his ultimate subordination of gender to other social and spiritual agendas a more deliberate and hence more compelling argument for the 'luxury' of gender." (Page 52)].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 31 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1998.

38. Record Number: 2036
Author(s): Cooke, Jessica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Januarie and May in Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale"
Source: English Studies , 78., 5 (September 1997):  Pages 407 - 416.
Year of Publication: 1997.

39. Record Number: 1996
Author(s): Allen, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer Answers Gower: Constance and the Trouble with Reading [the Man of Law's reactions to the incest theme in Gower's "Confessio Amantis"].
Source: ELH: A Journal of English Literary History (Full Text via Project Muse) 64, 3 (Autumn 1997): 627-655. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

40. Record Number: 20981
Author(s): Reed, Teresa P
Contributor(s):
Title : Shadows of the Law: Chaucer's "Man of Law's Tale," Exemplarity and Narrativity
Source: Mediaevalia , 21., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 231 - 248.
Year of Publication: 1997.

41. Record Number: 20982
Author(s): Salla, Sandra M
Contributor(s):
Title : Disappearing Fairies in the "Wife of Bath's Tale"
Source: Mediaevalia , 21., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 281 - 293.
Year of Publication: 1997.

42. Record Number: 2271
Author(s): Kraman, Cynthia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Communities of Otherness in Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale" [suggests that the female body, the Jewish text of the "Song of Songs," and the enclosed garden are all marginal elements that take on central importance at January's expense].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997.  Pages 138 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1997.

43. Record Number: 2467
Author(s): Raybin, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Creation and Recreation of the "Lyf of Seynt Cecile" [concerns how Chaucer fit the translated saint's life into the profane context of the Cantrbury tales; compares the austere otherworldliness of Saint Cecilia with the more complex, spiritual views of the "Canon's Yeoman's Prologue" and "Tale" and other tales].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 196 - 212.
Year of Publication: 1997.

44. Record Number: 2640
Author(s): Keller, Kimberly.
Contributor(s):
Title : Prudence's Pedagogy of the Oppressed [Prudence persuades her husband Melibee to take her advice through the use of scholastic arguments and learned citations; she changes the balance of power and sets an example for her female readers].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 98., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 415 - 426.
Year of Publication: 1997.

45. Record Number: 2460
Author(s): Thomas, Susanne Sara.
Contributor(s):
Title : What the Man of Law Can't Say: The Buried Legal Argument of the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" [argues that the poem comments on the struggle over law among king, parliament, bureaucrats, and peasants; it supports the legal authority of the oral over the written].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 3 ( 1997):  Pages 256 - 271.
Year of Publication: 1997.

46. Record Number: 2466
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Apprentice Janekyn/Clerk Jankyn: Discrete Phases in Chaucer's Developing Conception of the Wife of Bath [argues that Jankyn went from an apprentice, to a clerk boarding in the house, to a clerk boarding with the Wife of Bath's gossip; this final situation allowed the Wife to make a knowledgeable refutation of the misogynist traditions and have a more developed courtship with her fifth husband].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 146 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1997.

47. Record Number: 2707
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman's "Pryvete," May, and the Privy: Fissures in the Narrative Voice in the "Merchant's Tale," 1944-86 [examines the disjunction in May's character between the raped young bride and the duplicitous shrew who cuckolds the old knight in the misogynous fabliau ending].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1997.

48. Record Number: 1968
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "St. Anne Trinity" : Devotion, Dynasty, Dogma, and Debate [cults and literary allusions toSaint Anne, her daughter, the Virgin Mary, and her grandson, Jesus Christ ; the author relates them to religious and social issues including the debate over the Immaculate Conception, the sanctity and worth of marriage, and the new model of the mother as saint].
Source: Studies in Philology , 94., 4 (Fall 1997):  Pages 395 - 416.
Year of Publication: 1997.

49. Record Number: 2706
Author(s): Harding, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dynamics of Law in the "Clerk's Tale" [examines three relationships which embody the law: the interaction between lord and people, between husband and wife, and between God and believer].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 45 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1997.

50. Record Number: 2424
Author(s): Burger, Glenn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Erotic Discipline...Or "Tee Hee, I Like My Boys To Be Girls": Inventing With the Body in Chaucer's "Millers Tale"
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 245 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1997.

51. Record Number: 2462
Author(s): McGregor, Francine.
Contributor(s):
Title : What of Dorigen? Agency and Ambivalence in the "Franklin's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 365 - 378.
Year of Publication: 1997.

52. Record Number: 2465
Author(s): Smith, Warren S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath Debates Jerome [argues that the Wife of Bath takes a centrist position on marriage and cleverly refutes the extreme misogyny of Jerome's "Adversus Jovinianum" and the classical tradition of anti-woman diatribe upon which he draws].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 129 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 2425
Author(s): Sturges, Robert S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Pardoner, Veiled and Unveiled
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 261 - 277.
Year of Publication: 1997.

54. Record Number: 2464
Author(s): Warner, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman is Man's Babylon: Chaucer's "Nembrot" and the Tyranny of Enclosure in the "Nun's Priest's Tale" [gendered analysis of "wandering" (sexual, narrative, and linguistic) discusses several themes including woman as tyrant, transgressive sexuality, and the dangerous influence of Biblical translations on women].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 82 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

55. Record Number: 2463
Author(s): Taylor, Mark N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Servant and Lord/Lady and Wife: The "Franklin's Tale" and traditions of Courtly and Conjugal Love [The author traces ideas in the anti-adultery tradition, represented by Marcabru and Chrétien, that are developed in the story of the married love of Dorigen and Arveragus].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 64 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1997.

56. Record Number: 1348
Author(s): Everest, Carol A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and Old Age in Chaucer's "Reeve's Prologue" [metaphors for old age and loss of sexual vigor examined in the context of medieval medical theory].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 2 ( 1996):  Pages 99 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1996.

57. Record Number: 3581
Author(s): Newton, Allyson.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Occlusion of Maternity in Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale"
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Mediaevalia , 21., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 63 - 75.
Year of Publication: 1996.

58. Record Number: 1340
Author(s): Parry, Joseph D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dorigen, Narration, and Coming Home in the "Franklin's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 262 - 293.
Year of Publication: 1996.

59. Record Number: 1344
Author(s): Beecher, Donald.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Silenced Knight: Questions of Power and Reciprocity in the "Wife of Bath's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 359 - 378.
Year of Publication: 1996.

60. Record Number: 1347
Author(s): Pulham, Carol A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Promises, Promises: Dorigen's Dilemma Revisited
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 76 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1996.

61. Record Number: 1341
Author(s): Jankowski, Eileen S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reception of Chaucer's "Second Nun's Tale": Osbern Bokenham's "Lyf of S. Cycyle" [the appendix reproduces lines from the "Second Nun's Tale" and the "Lyf of S. Cycyle" that are similar].
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 306 - 318.
Year of Publication: 1996.

62. Record Number: 869
Author(s): Raybin, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Death of a Silent Woman: Voice and Power in Chaucer's Manciple's Tale [Phebus's wife is compared to the crow; both are unnaturally caged and seek their freedom].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 95., 1 (Jan. 1996):  Pages 19 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1996.

63. Record Number: 1346
Author(s): Beidler, Peter G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Price of Sex in Chaucer's "Shipman's Tale" [value of the 100 francs that the wife of the merchant of St. Denis charged the monk for one night of sex].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 5 - 17.
Year of Publication: 1996.

64. Record Number: 1343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly
Contributor(s):
Title : Cambridge MS. DD.4.24: A Misogynous Scribal Revision of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue"?
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 343 - 358.
Year of Publication: 1996.

65. Record Number: 945
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Possible Unity of Chaucer's Prioresses [argues that the prioress of the "Prologue" is a pretentious bourgeoise, while the prioress narrator worships the image of a divine child but has no love for humanity].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 3., ( 1996):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1996.

66. Record Number: 1469
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Voice for the Prioress: The Context of English Devotional Prose [analyzes stylistic features that echo the colloquial and affective elements in devotional literature written for women religious as well as common rhetorical practices like repetition and opposition].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 18., ( 1996):  Pages 25 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

67. Record Number: 1584
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Wife of Bath and Vernacular Translations [the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" amd "Tale" promote the status of the vernacular and acknowledge the role female audiences play in the translations of "authoritative" texts like Trotula].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 97 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1996.

68. Record Number: 1783
Author(s): Newman, Florence.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Man with Two Wives: Female Rivalry and Social Power in a Medieval Motif [International Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, May 1996].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 19 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1996.

69. Record Number: 1632
Author(s): Godorecci, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Re-Writing Griselda: Trials of the Grey Battle Maiden [the handling of the testing theme in Boccaccio, Petrarch's Latin translation, and Chaucer's English version].
Source: Romance Languages Annual , 8., ( 1996):  Pages 192 - 196.
Year of Publication: 1996.

70. Record Number: 1349
Author(s): Kelly, Henry Ansgar.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Neo-Revisionist Looks at Chaucer's Nuns [historical sketch of English nuns' conditions including estimated numbers, sources of income, opportunities to go on pilgrimage, and the priests associated with women's monasteries].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 2 ( 1996):  Pages 115 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1996.

71. Record Number: 1582
Author(s): Marvin, Corey J.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Will Thee Not Forsake: The Kristevan Maternal Space in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale" and John of Garland's "Stella maris"
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 35 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

72. Record Number: 879
Author(s): Flake, Timothy H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Love, "Trouthe," and the Happy Ending of the "Franklin's Tale" [Dorigen and Arveragus keep their word, proving the power of "trouthe" in the service of "gentillesse."]
Source: English Studies , 77., 3 (May 1996):  Pages 209 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1996.

73. Record Number: 1583
Author(s): Schibanoff, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Worlds Apart: Orientalism, Antifeminism, and Heresy in Chaucer's "Man of Law's Tale" [heresy includes both Islam and the Lollard movement which is mentioned in the "Epilogue" to the "Man of Law's Tale"].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 59 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1996.

74. Record Number: 9517
Author(s): Cox, Catherine S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Jangler's "Bourde": Gender, Renunciation, and Chaucer's Manciple [The author argues that the Manciple speaks in his mother's voice to emphasize anti-feminist themes. The kinds of indirect language used by the Manciple fit in with the "Parson's Tale" and the "Retractions," suggesting a resistant reading of Chaucer's reaction to orthodox theology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: South Atlantic Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 4 (Fall 1996): 1-21. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

75. Record Number: 1624
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Freedom Through Renunciation? Women's Voices, Women's Bodies, and the Phallic Order [female literary characters who want to abstain from sex].
Source: Desire and Discipline: Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray and Konrad Eisenbichler .   University of Toronto Press, 1996.  Pages 245 - 264.
Year of Publication: 1996.

76. Record Number: 49
Author(s): Lynch, Kathryn L.
Contributor(s):
Title : East Meets West in Chaucer's Squire's and Franklin's Tales
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 70 (1995): 530-551. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

77. Record Number: 311
Author(s): Cowgill, Bruce Kent.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sweetness and Sweat: The Extraordinary Emanations in Fragment Eight of the "Canterbury Tales"
Source: Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 343 - 357.
Year of Publication: 1995.

78. Record Number: 7
Author(s): Edwards, Robert R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Pious Talk About Marriage: Two Speeches from the Canterbury Tales [Franklin's Tale and Merchant's Tale].
Source: Matrons and Marginal Women in Medieval Society.   Edited by Robert R. Edwards and Vickie Ziegler .   Boydell Press, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 111 - 127. A portion of this essay is taken from Edwards's article published in Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 66 (1991): 342-367. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

79. Record Number: 255
Author(s): Farvolden, Pamela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Love Can No Frenship: Erotic Triangles in Chaucer's "Knight's Tale" and Lydgate's "Fabula duorum mercatorum"
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 21 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1995.

80. Record Number: 257
Author(s): Everest, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Paradys or Helle: Pleasure and Procreation in Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale"
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 63 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1995.

81. Record Number: 258
Author(s): Whitaker, Muriel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artists' Ideal Griselda
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 85 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1995.

82. Record Number: 260
Author(s): Filax, Elaine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Ideal: Chaucer's Second Nun
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 4 (Fall 1995):  Pages 133 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1995.

83. Record Number: 330
Author(s): Heffernan, Carol Falvo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Contraception and the Pear Tree Episode of Chaucer's Merchant's Tale
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 94., 1 (Jan. 1995):  Pages 31 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1995.

84. Record Number: 6682
Author(s): Saunders, Corinne J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman Displaced: Rape and Romance in Chaucer's "Wife of Bath's Tale" ["Thus, the 'Wife of Bath's Tale' achieves two ends simultaneously. It explores minutely the problem of rape as a crime and the legal confusion over its status, referring to changing views of rape and the legal displacement of women, to the desire of women for action against rape, and to the possibility of the education of men regarding the need for equality in relationships yet at the same time, the tale affirms patriarchal values, inserting the woman within these structures and sustaining a traditional insistence on the action of rape as an element of romance: we hear no more of the victim, the knight is punished, but finally rewarded through otherworldly adventure, and the ideal of the young, beautiful and obedient wife is upheld." (page 131)].
Source: Arthurian Literature , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 115 - 131.
Year of Publication: 1995.

85. Record Number: 450
Author(s): Olson, Glending.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Marital Dilemma in the Wife of Bath's Tale: An Unnoticed Analogue and Its Chaucerian Court Context [Balade 806 ("Lequel vault mieulx a jeune chevalier") by Eustache Deschamps].
Source: English Language Notes , 33., 1 (Sept. 1995):  Pages 1 - 7.
Year of Publication: 1995.

86. Record Number: 636
Author(s): Sprung, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : If It Youre Wille Be: Coercion and Compliance in Chaucer's Clerk's Tale
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 345 - 369.
Year of Publication: 1995.

87. Record Number: 420
Author(s): Van Dyke, Carolynn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clerk's and Franklin's Subjected Subjects [individual agency of Dorigen and Griselda].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 17., ( 1995):  Pages 45 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1995.

88. Record Number: 343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly
Contributor(s):
Title : Variant Passages in the Wife of Bath's Prologue and the Textual Transmission of the "Canterbury Tales": The "Great Tradition" Revisited
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 17., ( 1995):  Pages 85 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1995.

89. Record Number: 406
Author(s): Collette, Carolyn P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Peyntyng with Greet Cost: Virginia as Image in the "Physician's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 49 - 62. Ed. by Jean Host and Michael N. Salda. D.S. Brewer
Year of Publication: 1995.

90. Record Number: 407
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints, Wives, and Other "Hooly Thynges": Pious Laywomen in Middle English Romance
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 137 - 154. Ed. by Jean Host and Michael N. Salda. D.S. Brewer
Year of Publication: 1995.

91. Record Number: 4828
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "New Rachel" and the Theological Roots of Medieval Anti-Semitism [The author analyzes Chaucer's use of Rachel weeping in the Prioress's tale; the author is not able to say conclusively that Chaucer was satirizing antisemitism].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 77., 3 (Autumn 1995):  Pages 9 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1995.

92. Record Number: 568
Author(s): Hopenwasser, Nanda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wife of Bath as Storyteller: "Al is for to Selle" or Is It? Idealism and Spiritual Growth as Evidenced in the Wife of Bath's Tale
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 10., ( 1995):  Pages 101 - 115. Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1995.

93. Record Number: 469
Author(s): Dishaw, Carolyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Queer Touches/ A Queer Touches Chaucer [the Pardoner makes the norm of heterosexuality visible].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 1 (Spring 1995):  Pages 75 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1995.

94. Record Number: 56
Author(s): Georgianna, Linda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clerk's Tale and the Grammar of Assent [Griselda's story as a religious tale].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 70 (1995): 793-821. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

95. Record Number: 435
Author(s): Lomperis, Linda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodies That Matter in the Court of Late Medieval England and in Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" [Alisoun as a female impersonator and male homoeroticism at the court of Richard II].
Source: Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 243 - 264. Special issue: The Production of Knowledge: Institutionalizing Sex, Gender, and Sexualiity in Medieval Discourse. Ed. by Kathryn Gravdal.
Year of Publication: 1995.

96. Record Number: 310
Author(s): Lee, Brian S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exploitation and Excommunication in the "Wife of Bath's Tale" [rape and its punishment].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 74., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 17 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1995.

97. Record Number: 352
Author(s): Boyd, Beverly.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Moments in the "Kneeling World" [mysticism and devotion to Mary in Chaucer's ABC and Canterbury Tales].
Source: Vox Mystica: Essays on Medieval Mysticism in Honor of Professor Valerie M Lagorio.   Edited by Anne Clark Bartlett, Thomas H. Bestul, Janet Goebel, and William F. Pollard .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Philological Quarterly , 74., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 99 - 105.
Year of Publication: 1995.

98. Record Number: 1644
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Malkin" and Dafydd Ap Gwilym's "Mald Y Cwd" [this female name had disparaging associations from the thirteenth century onward ; in literature Malkin and Mald were ugly, sluttish hags].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1995):  Pages 159 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1995.

99. Record Number: 637
Author(s): Vasta, Edward.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer, Gower, and the Unknown Minstrel: The Literary Liberation of the Loathly Lady [uses Bakhtin's theory of carnival and the grotesque to contrast treatment of the Loathly Lady].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 395 - 418.
Year of Publication: 1995.

100. Record Number: 523
Author(s): Cox, Catherine S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Grope Wel Bihynde: The Subversive Erotics of Chaucer's Summoner
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 1 (Spring 1995):  Pages 145 - 177.
Year of Publication: 1995.

101. Record Number: 453
Author(s): Heinrichs, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tropological Woman in Chaucer: Literary Elaborations of an Exegetical Tradition [references to The Fall in the Canterbury Tales].
Source: English Studies , 76., 3 (May 1995):  Pages 209 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1995.

102. Record Number: 518
Author(s): Pigg, Daniel F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Constructing a Voice for Chaucer's Second Nun: Martyrdom as Institutional Discourse
Source: Aestel , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 81 - 95.
Year of Publication: 1995.

103. Record Number: 152
Author(s): Scala, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Canacee and the Chaucer Canon: Incest and Other Unnarratables
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 15 - 39.
Year of Publication: 1995.

104. Record Number: 583
Author(s): Eadie, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's Non- Hengwrt Lines: Chaucerian Revision or Editorial Meddling? [differences in manuscript versions of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue" may be the result of Chaucer's revisions or more likely the additions of an early anti- feminist emender]
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 169 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1995.

105. Record Number: 245
Author(s): Kennedy, Thomas C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translator's Voice in the Second Nun's "Invocacio": Gender, Influence, and Textuality
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 22., ( 1995):  Pages 95 - 110. Special issue: Diversity
Year of Publication: 1995.

106. Record Number: 4430
Author(s): Pelen, Marc M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Providence and Incest Reconsidered: Chaucer's Poetic Judgment of His Man of Law
Source: Papers on Language and Literature , 30., 2 (Spring 1994):  Pages 132 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1994.

107. Record Number: 1411
Author(s): Koubena, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lover's Cure in Ovid's "Remedia Amoris" and Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" [it requires that the lover experience the foulness of the naked female body].
Source: English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 13 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1994.

108. Record Number: 1949
Author(s): Manzanas Calvo, Ana Maria.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Economics of Salvation in "The Book of Margery Kempe" and "The Pardoner's Prologue": The Vision of Purgatory
Source: Papers from the VII International Conference of the Spanish Society for Medieval English Language & Literature. .  1994. English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 175 - 185.
Year of Publication: 1994.

109. Record Number: 1948
Author(s): Giménez Bon, Margarita.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Good Wif Was Ther of Biside Bath [the figure of the Wife of Bath in Ní Dhuibhne's modern short story].
Source: Papers from the VII International Conference of the Spanish Society for Medieval English Language & Literature. .  1994. English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 101 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1994.

110. Record Number: 1407
Author(s): Leicester, H. Marshall, Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : Newer Currents in Psychoanalytic Criticism, and the Difference "It" Makes: Gender and Desire in the "Miller's Tale" [psychoanalytic and post-Lacanian feminist gender theory applied to the figure of Alisoun].
Source: ELH: A Journal of English Literary History (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 3 (Autumn 1994): 473-499. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

111. Record Number: 1436
Author(s): Finnegan, Robert Emmett.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Should Have Said No to Walter: Griselda's Promise in "The Clerk's Tale" [emphasis on Griselda's moral responsibility with an analyis of the terms "assenten" and "consenten" and "tempten," "assaien," and "assaillen"].
Source: English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 303 - 321.
Year of Publication: 1994.

112. Record Number: 1409
Author(s): Dane, Joseph A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Syntaxis Recepta" of Chaucer's "Prologue to the Miller's Tale," Lines 3159-61
Source: English Language Notes , 31., 4 (June 1994):  Pages 10 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1994.

113. Record Number: 1541
Author(s): Barnett, Pamela E.
Contributor(s):
Title : And Shortly For to Seyn They Were Aton: Chaucer's Deflection of Rape in the "Reeve's" and "Franklin's Tales" [examines the intentions of the sexual violators to injure the fathers and husbands in the "Tales" by raping their women; also comments on the silenced female characters].
Source: Women's Studies , 22., 2 ( 1993):  Pages 145 - 162.
Year of Publication: 1993.

114. Record Number: 9455
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Double Sorwe” of the Wife of Bath: Chaucer and the Misogynist Tradition [Although the Wife of Bath can be read as a strong voice of defiance against male authority, she is ultimately an ambivalent figure. She expresses both anger and sorrow in response to conflicting and contradictory male attitudes toward marriage, female sexuality, and the worth of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 179 - 205.
Year of Publication: 1992.

115. Record Number: 9489
Author(s): Phelpstead, Carl.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Man of Law's Tale” as a philosophical narrative [The author argues that certain of Chaucer’s tales which are usually considered mainly exemplary in fact explore Boethian philosophical problems of suffering that apply to everyone. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 22., ( 1992):  Pages 181 - 189.
Year of Publication: 1992.

116. Record Number: 9485
Author(s): Johnson, Lynn Staley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Tale of the Second Nun and the Strategies of Dissent [The article considers the way Chaucer uses the Saint Cecilia legend to comment upon the status of the Church’s moral authority in the late fourteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Studies in Philology , 89., 3 (Summer 1992):  Pages 314 - 333.
Year of Publication: 1992.

117. Record Number: 9462
Author(s): Galloway, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Sermons, Polemical Sermons, and “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue”: A Generic Excursus [Instead of reading “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue” against an antifeminist literary tradition, the author reads the work against medieval sermons on marriage. In the fourteenth century, these sermons were both for and against women, and in this poem the Wife of Bath assumes the authoritative stance of a preacher on marriage. The author sees parallels between the “Prologue” and the marriage sermons of Jacob of Voragine. Moreover, the poem’s focus on women’s speech and power refers to fourteenth century struggles over who had the authority to preach. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 14., ( 1992):  Pages 3 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1992.

118. Record Number: 9542
Author(s): Alexander, Philip S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Madame Eglentyne, Geoffrey Chaucer and the Problem of Medieval Anti-Semitism [The author argues that Chaucer’s Prioress’s Tale is unquestionably antisemitic in nature. Although many literary critics have tried to defend Chaucer against antisemitism by pointing to his highly ironic portrayal of the tale’s narrator (the Prioress), Chaucer ultimately reflects the biases of his contemporaries. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 74., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 109 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1992.

119. Record Number: 7394
Author(s): Raybin, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wommen, of Kynde, Desiren Libertee: Rereading Dorigen, Rereading Marriage [The author suggests we re-read the "Franklin's Tale" from the perspective of its female character, Dorigen, in order to detect Chaucer's view on marital authority and women's agency. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 27., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 65 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1992.

120. Record Number: 7393
Author(s): Weisberg, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Telling Stories About Constance: Framing and Narrative Strategy in the "Canterbury Tales" [The author suggests we read the "Canterbury Tales" in terms of its "discourse on the frame" to better understand Chaucer's narrative organization, and uses the "Man of Law's Tale" to show how such a reading reveals nuances in character voice. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 27., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 45 - 64.
Year of Publication: 1992.

121. Record Number: 7415
Author(s): Tigges, Wim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lat the Womman Telle Hire Tale A Reading of the "Wife of Bath's Tale" [The author demonstrates that the answer to the queen's question in the "Wife of Bath's Tale" is that, "what women do definitely not desire is rape." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: English Studies , 73., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 97 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1992.

122. Record Number: 10780
Author(s): Wood, Chauncey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Three Chaucerian Widows: Tales of Innocence and Experience [The author contrasts the Wife of Bath with the Prioress and the Second Nun, finding her lacking in mercy and preoccupied with worldly concerns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. English Studies , 73., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 282 - 290.
Year of Publication: 1992.

123. Record Number: 7344
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Privileged Knowledge: St. Cecilia and the Alchemist in the "Canterbury Tales" [The author reads the "Second Nun's Tale" against the Alchemist's Tale in order to explore Chaucer's interest in the "epistemology of artistic transformation." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Chaucer Review , 27., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 87 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1992.

124. Record Number: 10016
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A note on Chaucer's Prioress and her literary kinship with the Wife of Bath [The author observes that the Prioress and the Wife of Bath share a source in La Vieille from the Roman de la Rose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 92 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1992.

125. Record Number: 9461
Author(s): Orsten, Elisabeth M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Madame Eglentyne in Her Day and in Ours: Anti-Semitism in "The Prioress’s Tale" and a Modern Parallel [The author assesses twentieth-century scholarship on Chaucer’s Prioress and the controversy over whether the character is anti-Semitic (she tells a story about a little boy killed by Jews). Although one might see the Prioress as anti-Semitic according to our modern post-Holocaust perspective, it is ultimately unknowable whether Chaucer shared her views. The author finds a modern parallel to “The Prioress’s Tale” in the story of a shrine in Rinn, Austria (dedicated to a boy supposedly killed by Jewish merchants in 1462); its cult following endured through the late twentieth-century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 82 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1992.

126. Record Number: 8778
Author(s): O'Brien, Timothy D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Troubling Waters: The Feminine and the Wife of Bath's Performance [The author discusses the relationship between women and water (both literal and figurative) in the "Wife of Bath's Prologue" and "Tale," paying particular attention to the idea of Bath/bath. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 377 - 391.
Year of Publication: 1992.

127. Record Number: 7392
Author(s): Edden, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sacred and Secular in the "Clerk's Tale" [The author argues that Chaucer's addition of humanizing character elements to the story of Griselda renders it secular rather than strictly religious or exemplary. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 4 ( 1992):  Pages 369 - 376.
Year of Publication: 1992.

128. Record Number: 7347
Author(s): McInerney, Maud Burnett.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucerian Ritual and Patriarchal Romance [The author argues that in adapting Boccaccio's Teseida, Chaucer marginalizes its female characters, and, as a result, masculinizes his own narrative romance, "The Knight's Tale." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 1., ( 1992):  Pages 65 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1992.

129. Record Number: 8724
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Truth and "Woman" in Chaucer's "Franklin's Tale" [The author explores the way the language used in the "Franklin's Tale" constructs, among other things, "woman," "troth / truth," and "freedom" as unstable concepts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 135 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1992.

130. Record Number: 9488
Author(s): Friedman, John B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nicholas's "Angelus ad Virginem" and the mocking of Noah [The author considers the humorous inversion in the “Miller’s Tale” of the Noah and Gabriel Biblical episodes within the context of other, similar kinds of medieval literary and artistic parodies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 22., ( 1992):  Pages 162 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1992.

131. Record Number: 7245
Author(s): Dawson, Robert B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Custance in Context: Rethinking the Protagonist of the "Man of Law's Tale" [The author suggests that we reconsider Custance in terms of her sophisticated, ironic use of language (which works to control her audience's view of her as a saintly figure) rather than as a completely passive and victimized character. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 293 - 308.
Year of Publication: 1992.

132. Record Number: 10766
Author(s): Dor, Juliette.
Contributor(s):
Title : From the Crusading Virago to the Polysemous Virgin: Chaucer's Constance
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 129 - 140.
Year of Publication: 1992.

133. Record Number: 10768
Author(s): Frese, Dolores Warwick.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Names of Women in the "Canterbury Tales": Chaucer's Hidden Art of Involucral Nomenclature [The author briefly discusses the rhetorical figure of "involucrum," which uses personal names to convey an allegorical meaning. The examples Frese cites include Saint Cecilie, Seinte Loy, and the description of the Wife of Bath as "biside Bath." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 155 - 166.
Year of Publication: 1992.

134. Record Number: 10251
Author(s): Wilson, Janet.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery and Alison: Women on Top [The author reads the fifteenth-century mystic Margery Kempe and the fictional character of Alison (Chaucer’s Wife of Bath) as flamboyant women who both cross social boundaries and disrupt social norms. Although their voices are mediated through men (scribes in the case of Margery and the author Chaucer in the case of Alison), these women can be read as examples of the carnivalesque: They both challenge patriarchal authority and subvert social hierarchies through their parodic or theatrical speech. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 223 - 227.
Year of Publication: 1992.

135. Record Number: 7413
Author(s): Hahn, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Performance of Gender in the Prioress [The author argues that Chaucer's Prioress both wears a kind of "mask of womanliness," and also identifies herself with a predominantly masculine Christian community by performing femininity. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 1., ( 1992):  Pages 111 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1992.

136. Record Number: 10276
Author(s): Dane, Joseph A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mulier Est Hominis Confusio: Note On Chaucer's "Nun's Priest's Tale" [The author argues that Chaucer may intentionally pun on the word "confusio" from the proverb "mulier est hominis confusio." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 276 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1992.

137. Record Number: 10756
Author(s): Allen, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blaunche on Top and Alisoun on Bottom [The author explores Chaucer's use of "descriptio" to characterize Blaunche and Alisoun. With Blaunche the physical characteristics confirm her virtuous moral qualities, while Alisoun's carnality givers her a certain autonomy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 23 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1992.

138. Record Number: 10779
Author(s): Wimsatt, James I.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, the Franklin, and the Rhetoric of St. Jerome [The author briefly explores the variety of viewpoints on virginity and marriage expressed by the Wife of Bath arguing against Jerome and the Franklin advocating a moderate response to Dorigen's solution of death or dishonor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 275 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1992.

139. Record Number: 10773
Author(s): Kooper, Erik.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Extremities of the Faith: Section VIII of the "Canterbury Tales" [The author contrasts the nun's Faith in God through her story of Saint Cecilia with the "Canon Yeoman's Tale" concerning the alchemist's false faith in the philosopher's stone. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 209 - 218.
Year of Publication: 1992.

140. Record Number: 11201
Author(s): Woods, William F.
Contributor(s):
Title : My Sweete Foo: Emelye’s Role in "The Knight’s Tale" [In this poem, the maiden Emelye acts as a mediator between the knights Palamon and Arcite. In terms of the poem’s narrative, Emelye is the love object whom both men desire. In terms of the thematic and poetic structure of the poem, Emelye represents the ambiguous vector between various types of opposing philosophical concepts (represented by the two male characters): for instance, humanity vs. nature, mercy vs. justice, love vs. war, individual desire vs. divine will. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Philology , 88., 3 (Summer 1991):  Pages 276 - 306.
Year of Publication: 1991.

141. Record Number: 11199
Author(s): Hagen, Susan K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath: Chaucer’s Inchoate Experiment in Feminist Hermeneutics [Although the Wife of Bath seems to represent the perspective of a real woman, she is in fact a fiction created by a male poet. Through the Wife of Bath, Chaucer tries to imagine how to represent a woman’s personal, secular experience when it does not coincide with what religious authorities claim a woman’s experience should be. In order to justify and relate her worldly experience, the Wife of Bath differentiates between religious and secular types of authority, interprets Scripture in her own way, and adopts a feminine, non-linear narrative style. In spite of these literary experiments, Chaucer ultimately fails to escape misogynist ways of thinking. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991. Studies in Philology , 88., 3 (Summer 1991):  Pages 105 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1991.

142. Record Number: 11200
Author(s): Owen, Charles A., Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Falcon’s Complaint in the Squire’s Tale [In its form and content, the falcon’s lament departs from the traditional poetic genre of the complaint. The poetic structure (including rhyme and meter) of this passage differs from other poems in the complaint genre, and the passage serves a narrative function as well as a lyric one. It relates the story of the falcon’s betrayal by her male lover and simultaneously expresses her emotional state through a complex series of poetic devices, including metaphors and allusions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991. Studies in Philology , 88., 3 (Summer 1991):  Pages 173 - 188.
Year of Publication: 1991.

143. Record Number: 12687
Author(s): Ireland, Colin A.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Coverchief or a Calle: The Ultimate End of the Wife of Bath's Search for Sovereignty [The author suggests that the Wife of Bath and her tale may be influenced by Irish stories both in the figure of the Loathly Lady who awards sovereignty over the kingdom and in the meaning of the word "calle" (Middle English: hair net, headdress) (Modern English "caul"). The author argues that Chaucer may be drawing on the Irish words "caille" (veil) and "caillech" (veiled one) to give a metaphorical meaning to "calle" as a marker of a woman's station in life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 150 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1991.

144. Record Number: 12689
Author(s): Storm, Melvin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Miller, the Virgin, and the Wife of Bath [The author argues that Chaucer intended readers to see parallels between Alison in the "Miller's Tale" and the Wife of Bath. Storm further argues that both women are compared unfavorably with the Virgin Mary, and the Wife of Bath in particular is faulted for both physical and spiritual barrenness. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 303.
Year of Publication: 1991.

145. Record Number: 10688
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath and the Revelour: Power Struggles and Failure in a Marriage of Peers [The Wife of Bath’s fourth marriage differs from her previous ones in one major respect: the fourth husband is her equal in terms of financial and social status, age, and temperament. The Wife’s uncharacteristic silence about her fourth husband and any disputes they may have had in marriage suggests that neither spouse fully dominated in the relationship. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 154 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1991.

146. Record Number: 8658
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Clerkly Allusiveness: Griselda, Xanthippe, and the Woman of Samaria [The author traces many sacred and secular allusions in Chaucer’s "Clerk’s Tale," a narrative about the virtuous peasant Griselda. Some of the allusions in the tale connect Griselda to Biblical exemplars of feminine obedience and submission (such as the Virgin Mary, Rebecca, and the Samaritan woman), but other allusions connect her to secular figures of female disobedience like Xanthippe (the wife of Socrates) and the Wife of Bath. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Allegorica , 12., ( 1991):  Pages 17 - 27.
Year of Publication: 1991.

147. Record Number: 10886
Author(s): Charles, Casey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adversus Jerome: Liberation Theology in the "Wife of Bath’s Prologue" [The Wife of Bath subverts ecclesiastical (clerical) modes of Biblical exegesis in the “sermon” that begins her "Prologue." She appropriates the method of scriptural interpretation used by writers like Saint Jerome, but she uses their interpretive strategies to support her own worldly and carnal ideas on marriage and sexuality. Her sermon is more than a parody of the authorities she imitates; she exposes the misogyny of clerical writers and also sanctifies the profane through her appropriation of exegetical techniques. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Assays: Critical Approaches to Medieval and Renaissance Texts , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1991.

148. Record Number: 11203
Author(s): Tobin, Lee Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Give the Saint Her Due: Hagiographical Values for Chaucer’s Second Nun’s Tale and Graham Greene’s "The End of the Affair" [When approaching Saint Celia (protagonist of the Second Nun’s Tale) and Sarah Miles (adulterous protagonist of Greene’s twentieth-century novel), modern critics perceive both of these heroines in a negative manner (deeming them disrespectful or unbelievable as female exemplars). However, such critics abide by rational and objective perspectives which are inappropriate for analyzing hagiographical literature. When viewed from a mystical and spiritual perspective, both heroines radically overturn male power structures and exhibit female strength and virginal power. While Greene revises the hagiographical tradition in his modern-day saint’s life, the essential features of the medieval genre remain unchanged. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica , 14., 40212 (Summer/Fall 1991):  Pages 48 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1991.

149. Record Number: 9543
Author(s): Frank, Hardy Long.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing the Prioress Whole [While many literary critics seek to psychoanalyze Chaucer’s Prioress, a more productive way to understand her is to examine the role of prioresses in fourteenth-century England. Prioresses were well-respected; they oversaw the daily activities of convents, entertained travelers of all classes, and traveled frequently on business trips. Rather than being childlike, sentimental, or naive, the Prioress is a capable professional woman who deserves respect. The Prioress’s Marian tale is also well-suited to her vocation and may perhaps refer to Chaucer’s own associations with the cult of Notre Dame du Puy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 25., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 229 - 237.
Year of Publication: 1991.

150. Record Number: 11079
Author(s): Finnegan, Robert Emmett.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife's Dead Child and Friar John: Parallels and Oppositions in the "Summoner's Tale" [The author suggests that the wife's dead child in the "Summoner’s Tale" may be a product of her affair with Friar John, in which case the child serves as a symbol for the Friar's spiritual condition. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 92., 4 ( 1991):  Pages 457 - 462.
Year of Publication: 1991.

151. Record Number: 11097
Author(s): Baker, Denise N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and Moral Philosophy: The Virtuous Women of "The Canterbury Tales" [The author briefly explores the sources for the representation of the four cardinal virtues in Chaucer's tales: fortitude (Constance in the "Man of Law's Tale"), obedience (Griselda in the "Clerk's Tale"), temperance (Virginia in the "Physician's Tale"), and prudence (Prudence in the "Tale of Melibee"). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 60., 2 ( 1991):  Pages 241 - 256.
Year of Publication: 1991.

152. Record Number: 12798
Author(s): Cramer, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lordship, Bondage, and the Erotic: The Psychological Bases of Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale" [The author offers a psychoanalytic interpretation of "The Clerk's Tale," questioning readings of the story which see Walter and Griselda as an "ideal" Oedipal couple. She further attempts to invalidate Oedipal resolutions by revealing their negative psyc
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 89., 4 (October 1990):  Pages 491 - 511.
Year of Publication: 1990.

153. Record Number: 12676
Author(s): Haahr, Joan G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Marriage Group" Revisited: The Wife of Bath and Merchant in Debate [The author compares the attitudes of the Wife of Bath and the Merchant toward marriage. Both emphasize the carnal aspects and presume self-indulgence rather than respect as the ruling factor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Homo Carnalis: The Carnal Aspect of Medieval Human Life.   Edited by Helen Rodite Lemay Acta .   Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton, 1990. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 89., 4 (October 1990):  Pages 105 - 120. Papers presented at a conference held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1987
Year of Publication: 1990.

154. Record Number: 12807
Author(s): Balliet, Gay L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife in Chaucer's "Reeve's Tale": Siren of Sweet Vengeance [The author analyzes the episode in which the miller’s wife attempts to strike him in order to take revenge for the wrongs he has done her. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 6.
Year of Publication: 1990.

155. Record Number: 12865
Author(s): Furrow, Melissa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Man of Law's St. Custance: Sex and the Saeculum [The author argues that the Man of Law's Tale must be read against the backdrop of other lives of holy women in order to show how Chaucer uses familiar material. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 24., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 223 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1990.

156. Record Number: 12862
Author(s): Raybin, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Custance and History: Woman as Outsider in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale [The author studies the ways in which Chaucer artistically transforms traditional medieval concepts of time in the Man of Law's Tale. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 12., ( 1990):  Pages 65 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1990.

157. Record Number: 12861
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Romance and Feminine Difference in "The Knight's Tale" [The article explores the ways in which Chaucer‚s generic revisions to Boccaccio's Teseida reveal a romance sensibility in "The Knight's Tale." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 12., ( 1990):  Pages 47 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1990.

158. Record Number: 12866
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Franklin as Dorigen [The author argues for the Franklin's marginal social status, and examines his gender and social rank in relation to the romance genre. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 24., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 236 - 252.
Year of Publication: 1990.

159. Record Number: 12808
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mars in Taurus at the Nativity of the Wife of Bath [The author investigates the Wife of Bath’s horoscope, and concludes she was predisposed to prostitution, basing this claim on a passage from Leopold of Austria’s astrological treatise, which states that if a woman is born under a feminine astrological sign, such as Taurus, and Mars is in that sign, she will become a prostitute. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 16
Year of Publication: 1990.

160. Record Number: 12757
Author(s): Martin, Carol A.N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alys as Allegory: The Ambivalent Heretic [The author argues that Chaucer endows his Wife of Bath with recognizably, even stereotypically, Lollard features in order to explore the tensions between orthodox culture and Lollardy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 52 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1990.

161. Record Number: 12864
Author(s): Dane, Joseph A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Prioress and Her Romanzen [The author demonstrates that the standard critical view of the Prioress as a romance heroine was invented by twentieth-century Chaucerians. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 24., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 219 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1990.

162. Record Number: 12875
Author(s): Edwards, Anthony S.G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Merchant's Tale and Moral Chaucer [The author argues that the Merchant's Tale produces a style and structure that render the tale morally neutral. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 51., ( 1990):  Pages 409 - 426.
Year of Publication: 1990.

163. Record Number: 12874
Author(s): Simmons-O'Neill, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Love in Hell: The Role of Pluto and Proserpine in Chaucer's Merchant's Tale [The author discusses the intercession of Pluto and Proserpine during the pear-tree scene in the Merchant's Tale, Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 51., ( 1990):  Pages 389 - 407.
Year of Publication: 1990.

164. Record Number: 32300
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, from the Ellesmere Chaucer
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 1 ( 1990):
Year of Publication: