Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


50 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 42497
Author(s): Catherine of Siena and Suzanne Noffke, O. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Catherine of Siena: An Anthology
Source: Catherine of Siena: An Anthology. Catherine of Siena.   Edited by Suzanne Noffke, O.P .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2012.  Pages 3 - 1143.
Year of Publication: 2012.

2. Record Number: 30981
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing Stigmata: Stigmatic Saints and Crises of Representation in Late medieval and Early Modern Italy
Source: Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 228 - 247. Special issue: Saints and Sanctity
Year of Publication: 2011.

3. Record Number: 20330
Author(s): Pozzi, Giovanni
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio della scrittura mistica: Santa Caterina [Medieval mystics tried expressing their experiences in various forms, including autobiography, narrative, and metaphysical discourse. Women mystics frequently employed autobiography, a diary or personal letters. Catherine of Siena dictated prayers, lette
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 20331
Author(s): Librandi, Rita
Contributor(s):
Title : Dal lessico della "Lettere" di Santa Caterina da Siena: La concretezza della fusione [Catherine of Siena used prophetic language in her letters. Although we lack a critical edition, the vocabulary of the letters can be studied for its use of metaphor. Her emphasis on images of spiritual feeding contrasts vividly with her extreme fasting i
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 19 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2006.

5. Record Number: 20332
Author(s): Santi, Francesco
Contributor(s):
Title : La scrittura nella scrittura di Caterina da Siena [The later Middle Ages saw an abandonment of confidence in language by intellectuals, with a related decline in exegesis of the Bible. Catherine of Siena used passages from the Bible, but she frequently used only a single phrase instead of full quotations
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 41 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 20333
Author(s): Leonardi, Lino
Contributor(s):
Title : Il problema testuale dell'epistolario Cateriniano [Catherine of Siena dictated her letters, and her oral language is reflected in the surviving texts. Modern editions too easily iron out the evidence of orality. The surviving manuscript traditions reflect the work of different secretaries and hagiographe
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 71 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2006.

7. Record Number: 20334
Author(s): Frosini, Giovanna
Contributor(s):
Title : Lingua e testo nel manoscritto Viennese delle letter di Caterina [Each collection of the letters of Catherine of Siena bears witness not just to the saint but to her secretaries and the compilers of individual manuscripts. The Vienna MS [ONB 3514] derives from the monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore. It brings together
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 91 - 125.
Year of Publication: 2006.

8. Record Number: 20335
Author(s): Zaggia, Masimo
Contributor(s):
Title : Varia fortuna editoriale delle lettere di Caterina da Siena [In the 16th century, the diffusion of the letters of Catherine of Siena in print derived from Venice. The texts were secured from Venetian Dominican houses. Only in the 18th century did the printing of Catherine's works pass to Tuscany and Rome. Older pr
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 127 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2006.

9. Record Number: 20337
Author(s): Trifone, Pietro
Contributor(s):
Title : Gli ingegnosi caprici di un linguaiolo: appunti sul "Vocabolario cateriniano" di Girolamo Gigli [Girolamo Gigli (d. 1722) composed his "Vocabolario cateriniano" as a part of a campaign against the Florentine domination of accepted Italian style. Gigli used passages from the saint's writings to illustrate local Sienese usages he wished to defend. The
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 189 - 203.
Year of Publication: 2006.

10. Record Number: 20338
Author(s): Bartolomei Romangoli, Alessandra
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio del corpo in Santa Caterina da Siena [Raymond of Capua described Catherine of Siena's body as transformed from a natural entity to one expressing Christ's own body. This was achieved by extreme mortification of the flesh, especially by giving up food. Catherine used bodily metaphors in her w
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 205 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2006.

11. Record Number: 20607
Author(s): Herzig, Tamar
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Participation in the Savonarolan Reform in Ferrara [The author explores women's activities in late 15th and early 16th century Ferrara. The holy woman, Lucia Brocadelli, was brought to the city by Duke Ercole d'Este to confer her prestige as a living saint on Ferrara. Lucia founded a house for female tertiaries dedicated to Saint Catherine of Siena. Savonarola's niece and other impoverished girls were encouraged to join (with their dowry paid by the duke) and perpetuate Savonarola's reformist ideals. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 543 - 564.
Year of Publication: 2006.

12. Record Number: 14698
Author(s): Luongo, F. Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saintly Authorship in the Italian Renaissance: The Quattrocento Reception of Catherine of Siena's Letters [The author argues that fifteenth century readers saw Catherine's letters as an important source of moral guidance. Furthermore their being written in the Italian vernacular was not a detraction. Catherine's mysticism conveyed authority as surely as Latin and Greek did for the classics. These trends crystalize in the edition of Catherine's letters printed by Aldus Manutius in 1500. He combines spiritual and literary goals with a new typeface for the saint's inspired vernacular. [Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 8., ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2005.

13. Record Number: 10934
Author(s): Lehmijoki-Gardner, Maiju.
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing Religious Rules as an Interactive Process: Dominican Penitent Women and the Making of Their "Regula" [In the fifteenth century, when the Dominican Order adopted their affiliated groups of penitent women officially, Thomas Caffarini rewrote the history of that association to make it appear more coherent. In fact, the relationship was informal; and these women and their patrons needed to lobby the friars for attention. Thus the original rule granted by Munio of Zamora was informal, given in response to these women. Once the order adopted the penitents more formally, they lost much of their initiative to the friars, whose histories of the movement buried traces of women's activities. Appendicies present the Latin text of Munio's "Ordinationes" written in 1286 for penitent women in Orvieto and a listing that compares the chapter headings in the "Ordinationes" with those in the "Tractatus," the Dominican penitent rule circa 1402-1405. Title note supplied by Feminae]
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 660 - 687.
Year of Publication: 2004.

14. Record Number: 11418
Author(s): Klaniczay, Gábor
Contributor(s):
Title : Le stigmate di santa Margherita d'Ungheria: immagini e testi [The earliest sources for Margaret of Hungary, a princess who became a Dominican nun, do not mention her stigmata. Reports of her reciept of the Stigmata were rejected by Tommaso Caffarini, but defenders of the story can be found as late as the sixteenth century. The earliest depictions of Margaret usually lack the stigmata, but a royal crown often is shown at her feet or on her head. Dominican claims to stigmatics threatened Franciscan ideas of their founder as "another Christ" ("alter Christus"), and questions about Margaret became intertwined with disputes over the stigmata of Catherine of Siena. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Iconographica , 1., ( 2002):  Pages 16 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 7066
Author(s): Debby, Nirit Ben-Aryeh
Contributor(s):
Title : The Preacher as Women's Mentor [Although a preacher like the Dominican Observant Giovanni Dominici guided women's lives, his audience also influenced him. Dominici's sermons praised the patriarchal family and procreation, while decrying all extramarital sex. He also criticized girls who became nuns for the wrong reasons, including the lack of a suitable husband. Dominici shared the misogyny of his age, but he showed an intimate awareness of women's situations and concerns. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Preacher, Sermon and Audience in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Carolyn Muessig .   Brill, 2002. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 229 - 254.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 5907
Author(s): Schmidt, Victor M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Painting and Individual Devotion in Late Medieval Italy: The Case of Saint Catherine of Alexandria because Catherine of Alexandria is ill-documented, possibly even legendary, ample room was left for invention by hagiographers; the tale of Catherine's conversion and mystical marriage to Christ is not in the earliest Latin or Greek sources; these stories are documented first in Italy, and they soon had an influence on artistic depictions of this popular saint; the same motif of mystical marriage appears in the lives of Italian women saints beginning in the fourteenth century; it is difficult to tell whether the Catherine story influenced these women or their mystical piety influenced the hagiographers who wrote about Catherine].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001. Iconographica , 1., ( 2002):  Pages 21 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2001.

17. Record Number: 4833
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Catherine of Siena and Lay Sanctity in Fourteenth-Century Italy [The author argues that Catherine's status as a Dominican tertiary without monastic vows or enclosure made her a lay person; in her preaching, letters, writings, and active involvement in Church and secular politics, she emphasized the roles of the laity]
Source: Lay Sanctity, Medieval and Modern: A Search for Models.   Edited by Ann W. Astell .   University of Notre Dame Press, 2000. Iconographica , 1., ( 2002):  Pages 77 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 5392
Author(s): Doglio, Maria Luisa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Letter Writing, 1350-1650 [The author gives a brief profile of a handful of women letter writers including St. Catherine of Siena and Alessandra Strozzi for the Middle Ages].
Source: A History of Women's Writing in Italy.   Edited by Letizia Panizza and Sharon Wood .   Cambridge University Press, 2000. Iconographica , 1., ( 2002):  Pages 13 - 24.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 4717
Author(s): Bauer, Elizabeth Jensen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Women and the Care of the Sick: Some Evidence from Hagiography [the author argues that some qualities that women saints display in the care of the sick according to their "vitae" are different from those in men's lives, namely humility, strength (not only physical strength but an absence of revulsion and nausea before the physical conditions of lepers and other sick people), and penance by identifying with the suffering of others].
Source: Magistra , 5., 1 (Summer 1999):  Pages 79 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1999.

20. Record Number: 3552
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystical Death, Bodily Death: Catherine of Siena and Raymond of Capua on the Mystic's Encounter with God [the author argues that Catherine's writings should serve as the main source of information about her spirituality and her life of concern for the Church and the world; her confessor, Raymond of Capua wrote a biography of Catherine that was shaped by his own hagiographic agenda and sought to minimize her activism in the world].
Source: Gendered Voices: Medieval Saints and Their Interpreters.   Edited by Catherine M. Mooney .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. Iconographica , 1., ( 2002):  Pages 136 - 167.
Year of Publication: 1999.

21. Record Number: 4907
Author(s): Vauchez, André.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between Virginity and Spiritual Espousals: Models of Feminine Sainthood in the Christian West in the Middle Ages
Source: Medieval History Journal , 2., 2 (July-December 1999):  Pages 349 - 359.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 4388
Author(s): Lacey, Antonia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Language and the Mystic Voice: Reading from Luce Irigaray to Catherine of Siena [The author applies the symbolic and semiotic language theories of Irigaray to the writings of Catherine of Siena; the author argues that Catherine found her authority in a self-affirming relationship with Christ].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Medieval History Journal , 2., 2 (July-December 1999):  Pages 329 - 342.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 5368
Author(s): Kelly, Henry Ansgar.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ethos Over Time: The Ongoing Appeal of St. Catherine of Siena
Source: The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric.   Edited by Christine Mason Sutherland and Rebecca Sutcliffe .   Papers at the Conference of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric at the University of Saskatchewan in July, 1997. University of Calgary Press, 1999. Medieval History Journal , 2., 2 (July-December 1999):  Pages 59 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 5054
Author(s): Nocentini, Silvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Una sequenza inedita di Raimondo da Capua [Raymond of Capua composed the "Vita" of Agnes of Montepulciano in 1365 after a brief stay in Montepulciano; he reports a liturgical sequence without music, that Agnes heard the angels sing in a vision of Mary seen shortly before Agnes' death; this sequence, with the rest of the "Vita," manifests Raymond's triumphant vision of Mary's glory; Catherine of Siena, even in Raymond's hagiographic work, conveys a more human vision of Mary's joys and sorrows].
Source: Medioevo e Rinascimento , ( 1998):  Pages 205 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1998.

25. Record Number: 3473
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine, Lacan, and the Problem of Psycho-History
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 3., ( 1998):  Pages 91 - 103. Translation, Transformation, and Transubstantiation in the Late Middle Ages
Year of Publication: 1998.

26. Record Number: 1937
Author(s): Villegas, Diana L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Discernment in Catherine of Siena
Source: Theological Studies , 58., 1 (March 1997):  Pages 19 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1997.

27. Record Number: 1216
Author(s): Kline, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Editing Women's Visions: Some Thoughts on the Transmission of Female Mystics' Texts [women mystics' writings were changed by late medieval English editors and translators who minimized and sometimes eliminated the female identity of the authors].
Source: Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 3 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1996.

28. Record Number: 2550
Author(s): Beemer, Suzy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Asceticism, Masochism, and Female Autonomy: Catherine of Siena and "The Story of O"
Source: Studies in Medievalism , 8., ( 1996):  Pages 195 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1996.

29. Record Number: 2821
Author(s): Maître, Jacques.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sainte Catherine de Sienne: patronne des anorexiques?
Source: CLIO, Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 109 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 3733
Author(s): Herlihy, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Caterina and San Bernardino: Their Teachings on the Family
Source: Women, Family, and Society in Medieval Europe: Historical Essays, 1978-1991.   Edited by David Herlihy .   Berghahn Books, 1995. CLIO, Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 174 - 192. The article was originally published in Atti del simposio internazionale Cateriniano- bernardiniano. Siena, 17-20 aprile 1980 a cura di Domenico Maffei e Paolo Nardi. Accademia senese degli Intronati, 1982. 917-933.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 8644
Author(s): Del Pozzo, Joan P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Apotheosis of Niccolò Toldo: An Execution "Love Story": Appendix A Translation of Saint Catherine of Siena's Most Celebrated Letter
Source: MLN: Modern Language Notes (Full Text via Project Muse) 110, 1 (January 1995): 164-177. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

32. Record Number: 8475
Author(s): de Courcelles, Dominique.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Dialogue de Catherine de Sienne ou l'accès du sujet intelligent créé à la perfection ultime du langage Thomiste au langage de l'âme
Source: Archives d'histoire doctrinale et littéraire du Moyen Age , 62., ( 1995):  Pages 71 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1995.

33. Record Number: 6625
Author(s): Papka, Claudia Rattazzi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Written Woman Writes: Caterina da Siena Between History and Hagiography, Body, and Text [the author argues that Catherine constructs her sanctity based on her body, both in terms of bodily suffering and her mystical assimiliation to the body of Christ, which allows her to take public action and have a public voice; her hagiographer Raymond of Capua prefers to emphasize gender, especially its negative stereotypes, and denies the body].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 131 - 149. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

34. Record Number: 6623
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Candied Oranges, Vinegar, and Dawn: The Imagery of Conversion in the Letters of Caterina of Siena [The author examines three letters that Catherine wrote in 1378 to Monna Costanza Soderini, wife of one of the Guelph leaders of Florence, to Stefano Maconi, one of her disciples in Siena, and to Pope Urban; all three of her correspondents were having dif
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 91 - 107. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

35. Record Number: 6627
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena in Late Medieval Britain: Feminizing Literary Reception Through Gender and Class [The author argues that the life and writings of St. Catherine had a great influence in England for 160 years following her death; she was valued for her role as a bridge between Christ and humanity, female and male, the lower social classes and the highe
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 163 - 203. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

36. Record Number: 6626
Author(s): Zancan, Marina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lettere di Caterina da Siena. Il testo, la tradizione, l'interpretazione [the letters of Catherine of Siena were gathered in private collections after her death and then in the Caffarini Collection, circa 1400; this was the version that passed into print; Catherine was careful to present herself as humble and unlearned, but her individual voice is heard through the letters even those revised in transmission to be more literary].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 151 - 161. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

37. Record Number: 390
Author(s): Luongo, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Catherine of Siena: Rewriting Female Holy Authority [use of erotic imagery and transformations of gender].
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 89 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1995.

38. Record Number: 6624
Author(s): Noffke, Suzanne, O. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Physical in the Mystical Writings of Catherine of Siena [The author argues that Catherine's physically vivid stories and images were intended to help her readers understand both God and human spirituality as incorporating and transcending the physical].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 109 - 129. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

39. Record Number: 3515
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Urban Spaces, Women's Networks, and the Lay Apostolate in the Siena of Catherine Benincasa
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994.  Pages 105 - 119.
Year of Publication: 1994.

40. Record Number: 6260
Author(s): Ferroni, Giulio.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Io e gli altri nelle "Lettere" di Caterina da Siena [Catherine of Siena can be described as the first woman author in the Italian vernacular, because we can hear her distinctive voice; however, in the transmission of her letters, most of them dictated to men, we have numerous problems of mediation to resol
Source: Les Femmes écrivains en Italie au moyen âge et à la renaissance. Actes du colloque international Aix-en-Provence, 12, 13, 14 novembre 1992. .   Université de Provence, 1994.  Pages 139 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1994.

41. Record Number: 1634
Author(s): Clouse, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Postmodern Look at the Mystical Body [application of postmodern theory to the mysticism of Catherine of Siena].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 20., 1 (March 1994):  Pages 3 - 9.
Year of Publication: 1994.

42. Record Number: 3516
Author(s): Roberts, Ann M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chiara Gambacorta of Pisa as Patroness of the Arts [the author argues that Prioress Chiara Gambacorta had an important role in commissioning and in choosing the subject, style, and imagery of the paintings produced for the convent of San Domenico, many of which represented female saints including Catherine of Siena and Bridget of Sweden].
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994. Mystics Quarterly , 20., 1 (March 1994):  Pages 120 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1994.

43. Record Number: 10003
Author(s): Sorelli, Fernanda.
Contributor(s):
Title : La produzione agiografica del domenicano Tommaso d'Antonio da Siena: esempi di santità ed intenti di propaganda [Many late-medieval saints' lives were composed by persons who knew their subjects, and chose to individualize them. Tommaso Caffarini's works personalize Catherine of Siena, presenting a spritual profile, not just recounting miracles. His work on Vanna of Orvieto and Margaret of Citta di Castello, however, is less rich in personal detail. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mistiche e devote nell'Italia tardomedievale.   Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi .   Liguori Editore, 1992.  Pages 157 - 169.
Year of Publication: 1992.

44. Record Number: 10176
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena, "Apostola" [The author argues that Catherine has most often been viewed either as the activist supporter of the papacy or the miraculous mystic celebrated in the canonization process. Scott argues that the autobiographical material in her letters paints a different picture. She saw herself as an apostle, a wandering preacher and peacemaker who integrated both the political and the visionary in a life of sacrifice and service. Scott suggests that she may have led such an active and unconvential life in part because she was not concerned about gender distinctions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Church History (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 1 (March 1992): 34-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

45. Record Number: 11073
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Catherine of Siena: The Two Hungers [The article discusses the “spiritual hunger” that Catherine of Siena describes in her writings, a hunger usually sated by the Eucharist, and related to her practice of fasting. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 173 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1991.

46. Record Number: 8654
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Secolo e chiostro [The penitent movement extended the monastic ideal to women living in the world. It was accessible not just to virgins, like Catherine of Siena, but to wives and widows. Originally published as "Penitenza e santità femminile in ambiente cateriniano e bernardiniano," in Atti del simposio internazionale cateriniano-bernardiniano, Siena 17-20 aprile 1980, edited by Domenico Maffei and Paolo Nardi (Accademia Senese degli Intronati, 1982). Pages 865-875. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 247 - 259. Originally published as "Penitenza e santità femminile in ambiente cateriniano e bernardiniano," in Atti del simposio internazionale cateriniano-bernardiniano, Siena 17-20 aprile 1980, edited by Domenico Maffei and Paolo Nardi (Accademia Senese degli Intr
Year of Publication: 1990.

47. Record Number: 8943
Author(s): Santi, Francesco.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tre manuali di storia del corpo [Modern historiography of holy women restores the body to importance, but it risks eliminating the concept of the soul. Catherine of Siena, for one, sought to transform the body, regarded as the female aspect of life, into a body of glory. In this review article the author discusses Rudolph Bell's "Holy Anorexia," Caroline Bynum's "Holy Feast and Holy Fast," and Ginette Raimbault and Caroline Eliacheff's "Les Indomptables." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 31., 2 (Dicembre 1990):  Pages 805 - 820.
Year of Publication: 1990.

48. Record Number: 28574
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena and Female Devotee
Source: Studi Medievali , 31., 2 (Dicembre 1990):
Year of Publication:

49. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena Receiving the Stigmata
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2c/Giovanni_di_Paolo_011.jpg/250px-Giovanni_di_Paolo_011.jpg
Year of Publication:

50. Record Number: 30910
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena before Pope Gregory XI at Avignon
Source:
Year of Publication: