Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


36 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 10451
Author(s): Ingham, Patricia Clare.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Kinship to Kingship: Mourning, Gender, and Anglo-Saxon Community [The author examines the characters Wealthow and Hildeburh in "Beowulf" and, to a lesser degree, the poems, "The Wife's Lament" and "Wulf and Eadwacer." Ingham argues that the women do important cultural work as the ones responsible for hopeless loss. In the larger historical moment they uphold the ties of kinship as society comes to accept the personal loyalty owed to a centralizing sovereign. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Grief and Gender: 700-1700.   Edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.  Pages 17 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2003.

2. Record Number: 11152
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Haliurunnas, Helrunan, and the History of Grendel's Mother
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

3. Record Number: 11155
Author(s): Gerli, E. Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nowell Codex: From "Judith" to "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

4. Record Number: 10108
Author(s): Towell, Julie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Transforming Power: Mis-Glossing Female Figures in "Beowulf" and "Judith" [Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Medieval Association, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, October 14-16, 1999, Session 4: "Anglo-Saxon Appropriations: Translating, Glossing, Editing Old English Texts."]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):
Year of Publication: 2000.

5. Record Number: 10111
Author(s): Drout, Michael D. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Deeds: Gender, Inheritance, and Death in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association of America, Chicago, December 27-30, 1999, Session 314: "Ways of Reading Old English Texts: Colonialism, Gender, and Identity."
Year of Publication: 2000.

6. Record Number: 10124
Author(s): Stratyner, Leslie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beyond "Gold-hroden": Oral Formulaic Theory and the Women of "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 461: "Beowulf III."
Year of Publication: 2000.

7. Record Number: 10122
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Consequential Actions/ Marginality and Perversion: Breaking the Man-Monster Binary in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 347: "Beowulf I."
Year of Publication: 2000.

8. Record Number: 5058
Author(s): McFadden, Brian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sleeping After the Feast: Deathbeds, Marriage Beds, and the Power Structure of Heorot
Source: Neophilologus , 84., 4 (October 2000):  Pages 629 - 646.
Year of Publication: 2000.

9. Record Number: 10110
Author(s): Gravlee, Cynthia A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Circling the Entity: Power and the Feminine Principle in Old English Poetry
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Medieval Association, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, October 14-16, 1999, Session 45: "Representing Women."
Year of Publication: 2000.

10. Record Number: 10121
Author(s): Trilling, Renée R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Monster's Mother: Maternity, Femininity and Alterity in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 347: "Beowulf I."
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 10123
Author(s): Peach, Bridget.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Suppression of the Powerful, Avenging Woman in "Beowulf": Beowulf's Encounter with Grendel's Mother
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 347: "Beowulf I."
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 4463
Author(s): Thompson, Victoria.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Power, and Protection in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century England [The author briefly explores Old English texts which present women's voices in order to determine whether their power was real or merely rhetorical].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4752
Author(s): Cadden, Joan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wealth They Left Us: Two Women Author Themselves Through Others' Lives in "Beowulf" [the author examines the cases of Wealhtheow who contemplates the story of Hildeburh mourning over her son and brother on the Finnsburg battlefield in order to avoid being a victim and of Hygd who considers the alternative of Thryth's life story, where she redeems her violence with generosity and a happy marriage].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 78., (Winter/Spring 1999):  Pages 49 - 76.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 3610
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beowulf's Tears of Fatherhood [the author argues that since Hrothgar's masculine power is fading, he proposes to adopt the powerful and masculine Beowulf, but Beowulf rejects his proposal]
Source:   Edited by Eileen A. Joy and Mary K. Ramsey with the assistance of Bruce D. Gilchrist Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (Spring 1998):  Pages 1 - 28. Reprinted in The Postmodern "Beowulf": A Critical Casebook. Edited by Eileen A. Joy and Mary K. Ramsey with the assistance of Bruce D. Gilchrist. West Virginia University Press, 2006. Pages 439-466.
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 3611
Author(s): Hala, James.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Parturition of Poetry and the Birthing of Culture: The Ides Aglaecwif and Beowulf [an analysis of Grendel's mother].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (Spring 1998):  Pages 29 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1998.

16. Record Number: 1404
Author(s): Olsen, Alexandra Hennessey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Roles [overview of recent scholarship with an emphasis on the active roles that women play in "Beowulf"].
Source: A Beowulf Handbook.   Edited by Robert E. Bjork and John D. Niles .   University of Nebraska Press, 1997. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (Spring 1998):  Pages 311 - 324.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 2349
Author(s): Drout, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Tolkien Reading "Beowulf": Is A "Masculinist" Interpreation Necessary?
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

18. Record Number: 1110
Author(s): Fee, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beag and Beaghroden: Women, Treasure, and the Language of Social Structure in "Beowulf"
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 97., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 285 - 294.
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 878
Author(s): Morey, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beowulf's Androgynous Heroism [in crossing tribal lines, Beowulf assumes the feminine role of peace weaver].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 95., 4 (Oct. 1996):  Pages 486 - 496.
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 992
Author(s): Menzer, Melinda J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aglaecwif ("Beowulf" 1259A): Implications for "-Wif" Compounds, Grendel's Mother, and Other "Aglaecan"
Source: English Language Notes , 34., 1 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 1 - 6.
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 2341
Author(s): Davidson, Mary Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Speech, Gender, and Linguistic Change in "Beowulf"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 458
Author(s): Overing, Gillian R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Women of "Beowulf": A Context for Interpretation [operation of desire within the poem and without; female characters as peace- weavers].
Source: Beowulf: Basic Readings.   Edited by Peter S. Baker .   Basic Readings in Anglo- Saxon England 1. Garland Publishing, 1995. Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):  Pages 219 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 493
Author(s): Grossman, Janice.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tropes of Femininity and Monstrosity in Old English Poems [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 244].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

24. Record Number: 495
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Grendelle: The Dead Mother in "Beowulf" [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 40.]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 491
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Toward an Understanding of Hildeburh: The Tales of Branwen and Guthrun [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 244].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 482
Author(s): Olsen, Alexandra H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Speech and Women's Power in "Beowulf" [Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association of America, San Diego, December 27-30, 1994, Session 57]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 494
Author(s): Tripp, Raymond P., Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Women are Unimportant in "Beowulf" Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 40.
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 4402
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Diminished by Kindness: Frederick Klaeber's Rewriting of Wealhtheow [The author argues that Klaeber was so influenced by his nineteenth century background (in which women were only mothers and had no power) that he mistranslated words to avoid Wealhtheow's power and political maneuvering].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 93., 2 (April 1994):  Pages 183 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 1410
Author(s): Albano, Robert A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Role of Women in Anglo-Saxon Culture: Hildeburh in "Beowulf" and a Curious Counterpart in the "Volsunga Saga" [Signy who seeks revenge against her husband, King Siggeir, for the wrongs he has done to her Volsung family].
Source: English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1994.

30. Record Number: 3561
Author(s): Lees, Clare A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men and "Beowulf" [The author argues that the masculinity in "Beowulf" is not as transparent as earlier critics have thought; the poem is both appreciative and critical of the patriarchal warriors].
Source: Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Clare A. Lees with the assistance of Thelma Fenster and Jo Ann McNamara Medieval Cultures, 7.   University of Minnesota Press, 1994. English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 129 - 148. Reprinted in The Postmodern "Beowulf": A Critical Casebook. Edited by Eileen A. Joy and Mary K. Ramsey with the assistance of Bruce D. Gilchrist. West Virginia University Press, 2006. Pages 417-438.
Year of Publication: 1994.

31. Record Number: 1408
Author(s): Taylor, Keith P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beowulf1259a: The Inherent Nobility of Grendel's Mother [meaning of the phrase "ides aglaecwif].
Source: English Language Notes , 31., 3 (March 1994):  Pages 13 - 25.
Year of Publication: 1994.

32. Record Number: 8721
Author(s): Bennett, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Mourner at Beowulf's Funeral: Filling in the Blanks / Hearing the Spaces [The article discusses the incomplete funeral passage in "Beowulf," and critiques normative editing practices around that passage, which tend to "fill it in" with a particular kind of female mourner -- the passive female victim -- rather than to accept its silences and its holes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 35 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 7420
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Issue of Feminine Monstrosity: A Reevaluation of Grendel's Mother [The author argues that labeling Grendel's mother "monstrous" is a relatively recent trend, originating not in the text itself (which calls her a "lady" and a "warrior"), but in translations and literary critical treatments of the text. The author argues that Grendel's mother was considered terrible because she violated gender norms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 23., ( 1992):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10193
Author(s): Justice, Steven.
Contributor(s):
Title : Þeah seo bryd duge!: The Freoðuwebbe in Anglo-Saxon Literature and Society
Source: Old English Newsletter , 25., 3 (Spring 1992): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Twenty-Seventh Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, May 7-10, 1992, Session 16: "Old English Literature I
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 11208
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Branwen, "Beowulf," and the Tragic Peaceweaver Tale.
Source: Viator , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1991.

36. Record Number: 12780
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Wealhtheow” as a Foreign Slave: Some Continental Analogues [The author discusses the possible meaning of Wealhtheow’s name (“foreign slave”) in relation to relevant parallels in patterns of medieval royal marriage, particularly in northern Continental kingdoms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 69., ( 1990):  Pages 107 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1990.