Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


56 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 28446
Author(s): Hanaphy, Stephen,
Contributor(s):
Title : Consolation and Desperation: A Study of the Letters of Peter of Blois in the Name of Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010.  Pages 206 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 15868
Author(s): Scarabello, Giovanni.
Contributor(s):
Title : Per una storia della prostituzione a Venezia tra il XIII e il XVIII sec [Beginning in the thirteenth century, the Venetian Republic made efforts to regulate rather than eliminate prostitution entirely. By the fourteenth century authorities were trying to concentrate prostitutes in regulated neighborhoods. Nevertheless, prostitutes continued to operate outside these sanctioned areas, especially in taverns and bath houses. Venetian laws protected prostitutes from abusive pimps but also tried to protect their patrons from diseases. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Veneziani , 47., ( 2004):  Pages 15 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 8077
Author(s): Salisbury, Eve.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Wife," the Law, and the Middle English Breton Lays [The author argues that Chaucer's Wife and the Breton lays address legal questions and loopholes concerning rape and marriage, commenting on and reinforcing the laws of both ecclesiastical and secular counts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Studi Veneziani , 47., ( 2004):  Pages 73 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 4686
Author(s): Marchand, James W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Quoniam, Wife of Bath's Prologue D. 608 [The author cites several humorous uses of "quoniam" for vagina in Latin, French, Spanish, and Provençal texts].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 43 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1999.

5. Record Number: 3734
Author(s): Storm, Mel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Speech, Circumspection, and Orthodontics in the "Manciple's Prologue" and "Tale" and the Wife of Bath's Portrait
Source: Studies in Philology , 96., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 109 - 126.
Year of Publication: 1999.

6. Record Number: 4688
Author(s): Puhvel, Martin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's Tale: Mirror of Her Mind [the author argues that the tale of the loathly lady and the knight who needs to learn about women reflects the wish fulfillment of the Wife of Bath, specifically in her need to dominate men, desire for uninhibited sex, and concerns about aging and ugliness].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 291 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1999.

7. Record Number: 4210
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's "Prologue," LL. 328-336, and Boccaccio's "Decameron"
Source: Neophilologus , 83., 2 (April 1999):  Pages 313 - 316.
Year of Publication: 1999.

8. Record Number: 20982
Author(s): Salla, Sandra M
Contributor(s):
Title : Disappearing Fairies in the "Wife of Bath's Tale"
Source: Mediaevalia , 21., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 281 - 293.
Year of Publication: 1997.

9. Record Number: 2460
Author(s): Thomas, Susanne Sara.
Contributor(s):
Title : What the Man of Law Can't Say: The Buried Legal Argument of the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" [argues that the poem comments on the struggle over law among king, parliament, bureaucrats, and peasants; it supports the legal authority of the oral over the written].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 3 ( 1997):  Pages 256 - 271.
Year of Publication: 1997.

10. Record Number: 2466
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Apprentice Janekyn/Clerk Jankyn: Discrete Phases in Chaucer's Developing Conception of the Wife of Bath [argues that Jankyn went from an apprentice, to a clerk boarding in the house, to a clerk boarding with the Wife of Bath's gossip; this final situation allowed the Wife to make a knowledgeable refutation of the misogynist traditions and have a more developed courtship with her fifth husband].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 146 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1997.

11. Record Number: 2465
Author(s): Smith, Warren S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath Debates Jerome [argues that the Wife of Bath takes a centrist position on marriage and cleverly refutes the extreme misogyny of Jerome's "Adversus Jovinianum" and the classical tradition of anti-woman diatribe upon which he draws].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 129 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1997.

12. Record Number: 1344
Author(s): Beecher, Donald.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Silenced Knight: Questions of Power and Reciprocity in the "Wife of Bath's Tale"
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 359 - 378.
Year of Publication: 1996.

13. Record Number: 1343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly
Contributor(s):
Title : Cambridge MS. DD.4.24: A Misogynous Scribal Revision of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue"?
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 343 - 358.
Year of Publication: 1996.

14. Record Number: 1584
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Wife of Bath and Vernacular Translations [the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" amd "Tale" promote the status of the vernacular and acknowledge the role female audiences play in the translations of "authoritative" texts like Trotula].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 97 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1996.

15. Record Number: 6682
Author(s): Saunders, Corinne J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman Displaced: Rape and Romance in Chaucer's "Wife of Bath's Tale" ["Thus, the 'Wife of Bath's Tale' achieves two ends simultaneously. It explores minutely the problem of rape as a crime and the legal confusion over its status, referring to changing views of rape and the legal displacement of women, to the desire of women for action against rape, and to the possibility of the education of men regarding the need for equality in relationships yet at the same time, the tale affirms patriarchal values, inserting the woman within these structures and sustaining a traditional insistence on the action of rape as an element of romance: we hear no more of the victim, the knight is punished, but finally rewarded through otherworldly adventure, and the ideal of the young, beautiful and obedient wife is upheld." (page 131)].
Source: Arthurian Literature , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 115 - 131.
Year of Publication: 1995.

16. Record Number: 450
Author(s): Olson, Glending.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Marital Dilemma in the Wife of Bath's Tale: An Unnoticed Analogue and Its Chaucerian Court Context [Balade 806 ("Lequel vault mieulx a jeune chevalier") by Eustache Deschamps].
Source: English Language Notes , 33., 1 (Sept. 1995):  Pages 1 - 7.
Year of Publication: 1995.

17. Record Number: 343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly
Contributor(s):
Title : Variant Passages in the Wife of Bath's Prologue and the Textual Transmission of the "Canterbury Tales": The "Great Tradition" Revisited
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. English Language Notes , 33., 1 (Sept. 1995):  Pages 85 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1995.

18. Record Number: 568
Author(s): Hopenwasser, Nanda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wife of Bath as Storyteller: "Al is for to Selle" or Is It? Idealism and Spiritual Growth as Evidenced in the Wife of Bath's Tale
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 10., ( 1995):  Pages 101 - 115. Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1995.

19. Record Number: 469
Author(s): Dishaw, Carolyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Queer Touches/ A Queer Touches Chaucer [the Pardoner makes the norm of heterosexuality visible].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 1 (Spring 1995):  Pages 75 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1995.

20. Record Number: 310
Author(s): Lee, Brian S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exploitation and Excommunication in the "Wife of Bath's Tale" [rape and its punishment].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 74., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 17 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1995.

21. Record Number: 637
Author(s): Vasta, Edward.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer, Gower, and the Unknown Minstrel: The Literary Liberation of the Loathly Lady [uses Bakhtin's theory of carnival and the grotesque to contrast treatment of the Loathly Lady].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 395 - 418.
Year of Publication: 1995.

22. Record Number: 583
Author(s): Eadie, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's Non- Hengwrt Lines: Chaucerian Revision or Editorial Meddling? [differences in manuscript versions of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue" may be the result of Chaucer's revisions or more likely the additions of an early anti- feminist emender]
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 169 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 1948
Author(s): Giménez Bon, Margarita.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Good Wif Was Ther of Biside Bath [the figure of the Wife of Bath in Ní Dhuibhne's modern short story].
Source: Papers from the VII International Conference of the Spanish Society for Medieval English Language & Literature. .  1994. Arthurian Literature , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 101 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1994.

24. Record Number: 9455
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Double Sorwe” of the Wife of Bath: Chaucer and the Misogynist Tradition [Although the Wife of Bath can be read as a strong voice of defiance against male authority, she is ultimately an ambivalent figure. She expresses both anger and sorrow in response to conflicting and contradictory male attitudes toward marriage, female sexuality, and the worth of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 179 - 205.
Year of Publication: 1992.

25. Record Number: 9462
Author(s): Galloway, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Sermons, Polemical Sermons, and “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue”: A Generic Excursus [Instead of reading “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue” against an antifeminist literary tradition, the author reads the work against medieval sermons on marriage. In the fourteenth century, these sermons were both for and against women, and in this poem the Wife of Bath assumes the authoritative stance of a preacher on marriage. The author sees parallels between the “Prologue” and the marriage sermons of Jacob of Voragine. Moreover, the poem’s focus on women’s speech and power refers to fourteenth century struggles over who had the authority to preach. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 14., ( 1992):  Pages 3 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1992.

26. Record Number: 7415
Author(s): Tigges, Wim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lat the Womman Telle Hire Tale A Reading of the "Wife of Bath's Tale" [The author demonstrates that the answer to the queen's question in the "Wife of Bath's Tale" is that, "what women do definitely not desire is rape." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: English Studies , 73., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 97 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1992.

27. Record Number: 10780
Author(s): Wood, Chauncey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Three Chaucerian Widows: Tales of Innocence and Experience [The author contrasts the Wife of Bath with the Prioress and the Second Nun, finding her lacking in mercy and preoccupied with worldly concerns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. English Studies , 73., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 282 - 290.
Year of Publication: 1992.

28. Record Number: 10016
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A note on Chaucer's Prioress and her literary kinship with the Wife of Bath [The author observes that the Prioress and the Wife of Bath share a source in La Vieille from the Roman de la Rose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 92 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1992.

29. Record Number: 8778
Author(s): O'Brien, Timothy D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Troubling Waters: The Feminine and the Wife of Bath's Performance [The author discusses the relationship between women and water (both literal and figurative) in the "Wife of Bath's Prologue" and "Tale," paying particular attention to the idea of Bath/bath. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 377 - 391.
Year of Publication: 1992.

30. Record Number: 10250
Author(s): Holloway, Julia Bolton.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride, Margery, Julian, and Alice: Bridget of Sweden’s Textual Community in Medieval England [Kempe models her devotional practices on Saint Bridget of Sweden, replicating the saint’s writings, life, and pilgrimages through her own book and travels. In her pilgrimages, Kempe visited the same sites Bridget did in her lifetime. Pilgrimage was available to both men and women, and writing a text enabled women to gain some access to power by narrating their travels. The author traces the lives, texts, and travels of historical figures like Saint Bridget of Sweden and Julian of Norwich, as well as Dame Alison (Chaucer’s fictional Wife of Bath). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 203 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1992.

31. Record Number: 10240
Author(s): Provost, William.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and Her Calling [The author examines the relationship between one’s identity and vocation (job or personal calling) in Margery Kempe’s book. Compared to the medieval woman writer Julian of Norwich (who clearly presents herself as an anchoress) and Chaucer’s fictional Wife of Bath (whose very occupation is being a “wife”), Margery’s social role is indeterminate. She is neither a conventional wife nor a religious woman, and she confuses both her contemporaries and modern readers because she does not fit into any stable occupational category. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 3 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1992.

32. Record Number: 10251
Author(s): Wilson, Janet.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery and Alison: Women on Top [The author reads the fifteenth-century mystic Margery Kempe and the fictional character of Alison (Chaucer’s Wife of Bath) as flamboyant women who both cross social boundaries and disrupt social norms. Although their voices are mediated through men (scribes in the case of Margery and the author Chaucer in the case of Alison), these women can be read as examples of the carnivalesque: They both challenge patriarchal authority and subvert social hierarchies through their parodic or theatrical speech. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 223 - 227.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 10779
Author(s): Wimsatt, James I.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, the Franklin, and the Rhetoric of St. Jerome [The author briefly explores the variety of viewpoints on virginity and marriage expressed by the Wife of Bath arguing against Jerome and the Franklin advocating a moderate response to Dorigen's solution of death or dishonor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 53., ( 1992):  Pages 275 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 11199
Author(s): Hagen, Susan K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath: Chaucer’s Inchoate Experiment in Feminist Hermeneutics [Although the Wife of Bath seems to represent the perspective of a real woman, she is in fact a fiction created by a male poet. Through the Wife of Bath, Chaucer tries to imagine how to represent a woman’s personal, secular experience when it does not coincide with what religious authorities claim a woman’s experience should be. In order to justify and relate her worldly experience, the Wife of Bath differentiates between religious and secular types of authority, interprets Scripture in her own way, and adopts a feminine, non-linear narrative style. In spite of these literary experiments, Chaucer ultimately fails to escape misogynist ways of thinking. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991. English Language Notes , 28., 4 (June 1991):  Pages 105 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1991.

35. Record Number: 12687
Author(s): Ireland, Colin A.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Coverchief or a Calle: The Ultimate End of the Wife of Bath's Search for Sovereignty [The author suggests that the Wife of Bath and her tale may be influenced by Irish stories both in the figure of the Loathly Lady who awards sovereignty over the kingdom and in the meaning of the word "calle" (Middle English: hair net, headdress) (Modern English "caul"). The author argues that Chaucer may be drawing on the Irish words "caille" (veil) and "caillech" (veiled one) to give a metaphorical meaning to "calle" as a marker of a woman's station in life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 150 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1991.

36. Record Number: 12689
Author(s): Storm, Melvin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Miller, the Virgin, and the Wife of Bath [The author argues that Chaucer intended readers to see parallels between Alison in the "Miller's Tale" and the Wife of Bath. Storm further argues that both women are compared unfavorably with the Virgin Mary, and the Wife of Bath in particular is faulted for both physical and spiritual barrenness. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 303.
Year of Publication: 1991.

37. Record Number: 10688
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath and the Revelour: Power Struggles and Failure in a Marriage of Peers [The Wife of Bath’s fourth marriage differs from her previous ones in one major respect: the fourth husband is her equal in terms of financial and social status, age, and temperament. The Wife’s uncharacteristic silence about her fourth husband and any disputes they may have had in marriage suggests that neither spouse fully dominated in the relationship. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 154 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1991.

38. Record Number: 8658
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Clerkly Allusiveness: Griselda, Xanthippe, and the Woman of Samaria [The author traces many sacred and secular allusions in Chaucer’s "Clerk’s Tale," a narrative about the virtuous peasant Griselda. Some of the allusions in the tale connect Griselda to Biblical exemplars of feminine obedience and submission (such as the Virgin Mary, Rebecca, and the Samaritan woman), but other allusions connect her to secular figures of female disobedience like Xanthippe (the wife of Socrates) and the Wife of Bath. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Allegorica , 12., ( 1991):  Pages 17 - 27.
Year of Publication: 1991.

39. Record Number: 10886
Author(s): Charles, Casey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adversus Jerome: Liberation Theology in the "Wife of Bath’s Prologue" [The Wife of Bath subverts ecclesiastical (clerical) modes of Biblical exegesis in the “sermon” that begins her "Prologue." She appropriates the method of scriptural interpretation used by writers like Saint Jerome, but she uses their interpretive strategies to support her own worldly and carnal ideas on marriage and sexuality. Her sermon is more than a parody of the authorities she imitates; she exposes the misogyny of clerical writers and also sanctifies the profane through her appropriation of exegetical techniques. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Assays: Critical Approaches to Medieval and Renaissance Texts , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1991.

40. Record Number: 11821
Author(s): Green, Richard Firth.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Analogue to the "Marital Dilemma" in the Wife of Bath's Tale [The problem facing the husband at the end of this poem (the choice between an old and faithful wife or a beautiful and potentially fickle one) has an analogue in a later French poem, "Les deux maris et leurs deux femmes." The French poem derives the marital problem from the tradition of Latin rhetoric and debate. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 4 (June 1991):  Pages 9 - 12.
Year of Publication: 1991.

41. Record Number: 12676
Author(s): Haahr, Joan G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Marriage Group" Revisited: The Wife of Bath and Merchant in Debate [The author compares the attitudes of the Wife of Bath and the Merchant toward marriage. Both emphasize the carnal aspects and presume self-indulgence rather than respect as the ruling factor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Homo Carnalis: The Carnal Aspect of Medieval Human Life.   Edited by Helen Rodite Lemay Acta .   Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton, 1990. Comitatus , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 105 - 120. Papers presented at a conference held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1987
Year of Publication: 1990.

42. Record Number: 12809
Author(s): Agapitos, Panagiotis A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Erotic Bath in the Byzantine Vernacular Romance "Kallimachos and Chrysorrhoe" [The author interprets the erotic bath sequence from Kallimachos, a Byzantine vernacular romance, demonstrating that the bath is therapeutic as well as erotic. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Classica et Mediaevalia , 41., ( 1990):  Pages 257 - 273.
Year of Publication: 1990.

43. Record Number: 12808
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mars in Taurus at the Nativity of the Wife of Bath [The author investigates the Wife of Bath’s horoscope, and concludes she was predisposed to prostitution, basing this claim on a passage from Leopold of Austria’s astrological treatise, which states that if a woman is born under a feminine astrological sign, such as Taurus, and Mars is in that sign, she will become a prostitute. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 16
Year of Publication: 1990.

44. Record Number: 12757
Author(s): Martin, Carol A.N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alys as Allegory: The Ambivalent Heretic [The author argues that Chaucer endows his Wife of Bath with recognizably, even stereotypically, Lollard features in order to explore the tensions between orthodox culture and Lollardy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 52 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1990.

45. Record Number: 28553
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bathsheba
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/Hans_Memling_-_Bathsheba_-_WGA14921.jpg/250px-Hans_Memling_-_Bathsheba_-_WGA14921.jpg
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46. Record Number: 28816
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Desco da parto [birth tray]: Birthing Chamber Scene (obverse view)
Source:
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47. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Bath
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8c/Albrecht_D%C3%BCrer_-_The_Women%27s_Bath_-_WGA7041.jpg/250px-Albrecht_D%C3%BCrer_-_The_Women%27s_Bath_-_WGA7041.jpg
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48. Record Number:
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Title : Men's Bath
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a0/D%C3%BCrer_-_Das_M%C3%A4nnerbad.jpg/250px-D%C3%BCrer_-_Das_M%C3%A4nnerbad.jpg
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49. Record Number:
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Title : Steam Baths
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Miniatur-eines-Frauenbadehauses-Konrad-Kyeser-um-1400.JPG/250px-Miniatur-eines-Frauenbadehauses-Konrad-Kyeser-um-1400.JPG
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50. Record Number: 30948
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Erotic scenes
Source:
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51. Record Number:
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Title : Nativity and First Bath of the Christ Child
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52. Record Number:
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Title : Warm Water
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53. Record Number: 31856
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bathing Scene
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54. Record Number: 32300
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, from the Ellesmere Chaucer
Source:
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55. Record Number: 32404
Author(s):
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Title : Scene of a Bathhouse
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56. Record Number: 32506
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Melusine in her bath, spied upon by her husband Raymondin
Source:
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