Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


76 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27565
Author(s): Garver, Valerie L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weaving Words in Silk: Women and Inscribed Bands in the Carolingian World [The author analyzes three silk woven bands surviving from Carolingian Germany: Witgar’s belt, Ailbecunda band, and the Speyer band. Witgar’s belt was a gift from Emma, wife of King Louis the German, to Witgar, the future bishop of Augsburg. In these three cases women not only donated high-status silk inscribed bands, but evidence also points to women as weavers of the tablet bands. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 33 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 27574
Author(s): Drpic, Ivan,
Contributor(s):
Title : Notes on Byzantine Panagiaria
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 28 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2009.

3. Record Number: 24046
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Women and the Needle Arts: Piety, Devotion, and Stitching the Sacred, ca. 500- 1150 [The author catalogs evidence of women’s embroidery for the Church done by queens, noble women, and nuns. They decorated Church vestments with gold, silver, and jewels. Schulenburg argues that their skills were values and associated with wisdom. Many of the embroiderers and patrons hoped for the special prayers of saints in return for their shining gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 83 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2009.

4. Record Number: 19219
Author(s): Leone, Stephanie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Vogue in Fifteenth-Century Florence: The Material Culture of Marriage [In this short, introductory essay for an art exhibit, the author surveys the meaning of the sumptuously painted wedding chest ("cassone") given by the groom and used to transport the bride's trousseau. The rich iconography of specific "cassoni" is discussed including the Meeting of Esther. Title Note Supplied by Feminae].
Source: Secular Sacred: 11th-16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.   Edited by Nancy Netzer .   McMullen Museum of Art, 2006. Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 81 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2006.

5. Record Number: 14122
Author(s): Franke, Birgit.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Role Models in Tapestries [The author briefly describes some of the tapestries owned or used by Margaret of York and her step-grand-daughter, Margaret of Austria. Frequently a series of tapestries celebrated heroic female figures like Esther, as savior of her people, and Abigail,
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 154 - 165.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 12606
Author(s): Starkey, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Tristan” Slippers: An Image of Adultery or a Symbol of Marriage? [Leather slippers decorated with iconography apparently representing the adulterous courtly couple Tristan and Isolde were popular in the urban centers of the Low Countries, and these shoes were perhaps given as bridal gifts or in betrothal ceremonies. Although the image of an adulterous couple may not seem appropriate for shoes associated with marriage, other iconography on the slippers (such as an orchard, falcon, chessboard, and literary inscriptions) and contemporary Dutch literature about the Tristan story indicate that the urban public was reappropriating elements of courtly culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 35 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 11959
Author(s): Beech, George T.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Eleanor of Aquitaine Vase
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 369 - 376.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 10748
Author(s): Carroll, Jane L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woven Devotions: Reform and Piety in Tapestries by Dominican Nuns [The author examines two tapestries that were produced by Dominican nuns in Germany. Both have small depictions of nuns working at looms in the margins. Carroll suggests that these images are part self-portraits, part devotional images, while also serving as exemplars of the Dominican reform for a "vita activa" that avoided luxury and sloth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 182 - 201.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 10996
Author(s): de Vries, Joyce.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caterina Sforza's Portrait Medals: Power, Gender and Representation in the Italian Renaissance Court [Caterina Sforza ruled Forli and Imola after the murder of her husband. She commissioned a series of portrait medals that established her persona first as a noble young wife, then a widow-ruler, and finally as a triumphant regent. The medals use motifs associated with male political power to indicate her authority and success. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 23 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2003.

11. Record Number: 10746
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gothic Mirror and the Female Gaze [The author explores the representations of couple on carved ivory mirror cases. Smith argues that in the majority of cases, the depicted female gaze is responsive to that of men with the male lover taking an active role. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 73 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2003.

12. Record Number: 10747
Author(s): Kornbluth, Genevra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Richildis and Her Seal: Carolingian Self-Reference and the Imagery of Power [The author explores women's use of seals during the Carolingian era. Kornbluth focuses on the drawing of a seal (now lost) engraved with the name "Richilde." She suggests that it may have belonged to the empress married to Charles the Bald and may represent the Greek mythological figure Omphale, the Lydian queen with whom Hercules fell in love. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 161 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 6617
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Renaissance Household Goddesses: Fertility, Politics, and the Gendering of the Spectatorship [the author argues that these terracotta statuettes of Dovizia (a woman with a basket of fruit on her head who is leading a little boy), based on Donatello's statue now lost, can be read both as an embodiment of wealth and fertility and as a political, public symbol of the city and reminder of the pre-Medicean era; the author explores the implications of both female and male spectatorship].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 163 - 189.
Year of Publication: 2002.

14. Record Number: 8487
Author(s): Cotsonis, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin and Justinian on Seals of the "Ekklesiekdikoi" of Hagia Sophia [The author explores the various meanings carried by the seals made for the clerical tribunal from Hagia Sophia, which present the standing figures of the Virgin and the Emperor Justinian, holding between them a model of the church Hagia Sophia. The church building in part signifies a place of mercy and refuge. Justinian was not only the builder of the church but also the patron of the clerical tribunal. The Virgin was the most powerful intermediary and an object of hope for the penitent and those in trouble. The clerics from the tribunal turned to the Virgin Mary and Justinian for help in coming to just and merciful decisions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 56 (2002): 41-55. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 8852
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : (In)Famous Men: The Continence of Scipio and Formations of Masculinity in Fifteenth-Century Tuscan Domestic Painting [The author explores the representation of Scipio Africanus in Florentine "cassoni" paintings on wedding furniture and argues for a range of masculinities. Some paintings celebrate his sexual restraint with Scipio returning the captured princess to her betrothed. However, other paintings present him as a conqueror with booty, an exemplar of masculine financial and political success for the bridegroom viewer. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 109 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 6221
Author(s): L'Estrange, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Incarnations and Confinements: the (in)visibility of childbirth in some late-medieval sources
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

17. Record Number: 7817
Author(s): Clark, Anne L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Priesthood of the Virgin Mary: Gender Trouble in the Twelfth Century [The author examines the writings of Hildegard of Bingen and Elisabeth of Schönau and the representation of Mary on the silver eucharistic chalice from Cologne. Though Mary is shown with her hands raised in prayer, her association with other male figures on the chalice suggests an affirmation of male priestly prerogatives. Hildegard and Elisabeth emphasize their visions and virginity, not to argue for the ordination of women, but to indicate the roles they and other religious women played in the church. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion , 18., 1 (Spring 2002):  Pages 5 - 24.
Year of Publication: 2002.

18. Record Number: 6256
Author(s): Halpin, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Piety. Part Three of Court and Piety in Late Anglo-Saxon England by Mary Frances Smith, Robin Fleming, and Patricia Halpin [the author focuses on the often rich material goods, sometimes of their own making, that women gave to the Church, including embroideries, woven cloth, ecclesiastical vestments, crucifixes, books, and jewelry; the author argues that women in general were concerned with encouraging a private, personal spirituality and had more control over the dispersal of their material goods than their land].
Source: Catholic Historical Review (Full Text via Project Muse) 87, 4 (October 2001): 588-602. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

19. Record Number: 5970
Author(s): Ketskemety, Esther.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Court, the Forest, and the Symbolism of the "chasse" in "The Bear Hunt," a Late Fifteenth Century Burgundian Tapestry Design
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001.
Year of Publication: 2001.

20. Record Number: 8677
Author(s): De Bingen, Hildegarde and Laurence. Moulinier
Contributor(s): Børresen, Kari Elisabeth, reviewer
Title : Rhetorical Images of the Virgin: The Icon of the "Usual Miracle" at the Blachernai [The author connects the icon of Mary at the Blachernai (which was revealed every Friday by the miraculous raising of a silk cover) with a new image-type in which Mary raises her hands in prayer and has a medallion that contains the Christ child hovering on her chest. The author argues that this image was influenced by Neoplatonic ideas to represent both the presence of the Holy Spirit and the embodiment of the incarnation. The author also connects the new image type to the Komnenoi dynasty which had various political reasons to champion orthodoxy. In the Appendix the author surveys publications on seals to identify instances of the orans Virgin with the hovering medallion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics , 38., (Autumn 2000):  Pages 34 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2000.

21. Record Number: 5450
Author(s): Tinagli, Paola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Womanly Virtues in Quattrocento Florentine Marriage Furnishings [the author examines how behavioral ideals for both new husbands and wives, as represented on cassoni, spalliere, and other furnishings given to the bridal couple, emphasized chastity, restraint, and other virtues that contributed to a well-ordered civic society].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 265 - 284.
Year of Publication: 2000.

22. Record Number: 5408
Author(s): Collier, Jo-Kate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cassoni: The Inside Story [The author argues that the nude paintings of men and women inside the cassoni lids were intended to arouse sexually the newly married husband and wife so that they would quickly produce a male heir].
Source: Renaissance Papers , ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 11.
Year of Publication: 2000.

23. Record Number: 3713
Author(s): Hanson, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Erotic Imagery on Byzantine Ivory Caskets
Source: Desire and Denial in Byzantium: Papers from the Thirty-First Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, March 1997.   Edited by Liz James. Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, Publications 6 .   Variorum (Ashgate Publishing), 1999. Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 23., ( 1999):  Pages 171 - 184.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 4443
Author(s): Monsour, Michele.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady With the Unicorn
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 134., 1571 (décembre 1999):  Pages 237 - 254.
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 4977
Author(s): Labarge, Margaret Wade.
Contributor(s):
Title : Stitches in Time: Medieval Embroidery in Its Social Setting [The author examines surviving physical evidence as well as some documentary evidence of embroiderers (who were mostly women); she traces the increasing luxuriousness of royal embroideries with gems and gold thread].
Source: Florilegium , 16., ( 1999):  Pages 77 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 4187
Author(s): Tuerk, Jacquelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Early Byzantine Inscribed Amulet and Its Narratives
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 23., ( 1999):  Pages 25 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1999.

27. Record Number: 4025
Author(s): Gourlay, Kristina E.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Positive Representation of the Power of Young Women: The Malterer Embroidery Re-examined [The author argues that the embroidery is to be interpreted as "positive and good-natured acknowledgment of the power of love and female sexuality and the responsibility of men in succumbing to this power..."].
Source: Young Medieval Women.   Edited by Katherine J. Lewis, Noel James Menuge, and Kim M. Phillips .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 23., ( 1999):  Pages 69 - 102.
Year of Publication: 1999.

28. Record Number: 4447
Author(s): Rushing, James A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adventure in the Service of Love: Yvain on a Fourteenth-Century Ivory Panel [the author argues that the Yvain panel was intended to remind viewers of the services that he performed for love and thus suggest the power of love; ivory boxes, of which this panel is a part, were given to noble women as love tokens and marriage gifts by their suitors].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 61., ( 1998):  Pages 55 - 65.
Year of Publication: 1998.

29. Record Number: 3660
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Rape of the Sabine Women on Quattrocento Marriage-Panels [the author argues that the theme of the rape of the Sabine women urged women to observe their duties of childbearing in a society seriously depopulated by multiple plague outbreaks].
Source: Marriage in Italy, 1300-1650.   Edited by Trevor Dean and K. J. P. Lowe .   Cambridge University Press, 1998. Florilegium , 16., ( 1999):  Pages 66 - 82.
Year of Publication: 1998.

30. Record Number: 6503
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medici-Tornabuoni "Desco da Parto" in Context [the author argues that the large and elaborately painted birth tray now in the Metropolitan Museum was given by Piero de Medici to his wife Lucrezia Tornabuoni on the birth of their son, Lorenzo de Medici; the author explores the production and use of birth trays in the celebration of childbirth in post-plague Italy].
Source: Metropolitan Museum Journal , 33., ( 1998):  Pages 137 - 151.
Year of Publication: 1998.

31. Record Number: 3147
Author(s): Caviness, Madeline H.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Contemplative Life in Washington
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 37, 2 (1998): 150-157. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

32. Record Number: 1591
Author(s): Armstead, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Interpreting Images of Women with Books in Misericords [some represent piety, while others mock women's pretensions].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 57 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1997.

33. Record Number: 3668
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imaginative Conceptions in Renaissance Italy [The author argues that women were encouraged to fulfill their maternal role through a wide variety of images and objects that emphasized the delivery of healthy, male babies].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 42 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1997.

34. Record Number: 2560
Author(s): Taralon, Jean
Contributor(s): Taralon-Carlini, Dominique, avec la collaboration de
Title : La Majesté d' or de Sainte Foy de Conques [see the accompanying article #2561 on the statue's crown].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 11 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1997.

35. Record Number: 2561
Author(s): Taralon, Jean
Contributor(s): Taralon-Carlini, Dominique, avec la collaboration de
Title : La Couronne [see the accompanying article #2560 on the statue].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1997.

36. Record Number: 2459
Author(s): Martindale, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Theodolinda: The Fifteenth-Century Recollection of a Lombard Queen [analysis of Theodolinda's meaning for the late medieval period, based on the art in the Theodolinda Chapel, the Cathedral's treasures associated with the queen, and the accounts by the fourteenth century chronicler Bonincontro and the eighth century historian, Paul the Deacon].
Source: The church retrospective: papers read at the 1995 Summer Meeting and the 1996 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 33.  1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 195 - 225.
Year of Publication: 1997.

37. Record Number: 3149
Author(s): Gerstel, Sharon E. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Construction of a Sainted Empress
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 11
Year of Publication: 1997.

38. Record Number: 1877
Author(s): Gerstel, Sharon E. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saint Eudokia and the Imperial Household of Leo VI
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 79, 4 (December 1997): 699-707. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

39. Record Number: 2572
Author(s): Gourlay, Kristina E.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Dame à la Licorne: A Reinterpretation [argues that the tapestry series does not represent an allegory of the five senses but rather a romance between the maiden and the unicorn in order to celebrate or commemorate a marriage in the Le Viste family].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 47 - 72.
Year of Publication: 1997.

40. Record Number: 1395
Author(s): Salet, Francis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chronique. Orfèvrerie. Les anges d'Anne de Bretagne du trésor du Saint-Esprit [summary of an article by Danielle Gaborit-Chopin published in the Revue du Louvre (1994), pages 17-28].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 154., 2 (juin 1996):  Pages 178 - 179.
Year of Publication: 1996.

41. Record Number: 2380
Author(s): Hooper, Bari.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Medieval Depiction of Infant-Feeding in Winchester Cathedral [misericord depicts an infant drinking from a cow's horn].
Source: Medieval Archaeology , 40., ( 1996):  Pages 230 - 233.
Year of Publication: 1996.

42. Record Number: 9803
Author(s): Motz, Lotte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Note on a Bracteate from Trollhättan [The author identifies the object held by a female figure on a bracteate ( ) as a yarn winder. Motz argues that such a tool used in spinning and weaving was also used by women in magical practices to ensure prosperity for the coming year. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Collegium Medievale , 9., ( 1996):  Pages 153 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

43. Record Number: 2279
Author(s): McClanan, A. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Byzantine Steelyard Weights Depicting Empresses
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 36
Year of Publication: 1996.

44. Record Number: 1017
Author(s): Caviness, Madeline H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Art as Nostalgia for the Future
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 22., (Fall 1996):  Pages 19 - 21.
Year of Publication: 1996.

45. Record Number: 818
Author(s): Legaré, Anne- Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reassessing Women's Libraries in Late Medieval France: The Case of Jeanne de Laval
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 209 - 236.
Year of Publication: 1996.

46. Record Number: 1357
Author(s): Beech, George T.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Eleanor Vase": Witness to Christian-Muslim Collaboration in Early Twelfth-Century Spain [argues that the vase came into the possession of Eleanor's grandfather, Duke Guillaume IX of Aquitane, as a gift from the Muslim king of Saragossa, perhaps in 1120 when they were both fighting against the Almoravid invaders near Saragossa].
Source: Medieval Life , 2., (Spring 1995):  Pages 12 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1995.

47. Record Number: 1987
Author(s): Mango, Marlia Mundell.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artemis at Daphne [mythological hunting motifs on brass buckets and a mosaic pavement at Daphne near Antioch are analyzed].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 263 Issue title: Bosphorus: Essays in the Honour of Cyril Mango. Ed. by Stephanos Efthymiadis, Claudia Rapp, and Dimitris Tsougarakis.
Year of Publication: 1995.

48. Record Number: 2722
Author(s): Jensen, Robin M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Femininity of Christ in Early Christian Iconography [suggests that feminine attributes of Jesus, including long, curly hair, smooth, beardless cheeks, and small, protruding breasts, were borrowed from savior deities of the mystery cults, especially Dionysus and Orpheus].
Source: Studia Patristica , 29., ( 1995):  Pages 269 - 282. Papers Presented at the Twelfth International Conference on Patristic Studies Held in Oxford. Historia, Theologica et Philosophica, Critica et Philologica
Year of Publication: 1995.

49. Record Number: 5558
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Noces feintes: sur quelques lectures de deux thèmes iconographiques dans les "cassoni" florentins [The author analyzes the scenes painted on a wedding cassone, formerly from the Rose Art Museum; scholars had believed that the scenes illustrated the story of lovers who reconciled their warring families from the "Istorietta Amorosa," but the author argu
Source: I Tatti Studies: Essays in the Renaissance , 6., ( 1995):  Pages 11 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1995.

50. Record Number: 484
Author(s): Kelly, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ubi unus clericus et Aelfgyva: Aelfgyva and the Bayeux Tapestry [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Sessio
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

51. Record Number: 1684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Theophano Leave her Mark on the Ottonian Sumptuary Arts?
Source: The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Turn of the First Millennium.   Edited by Adelbert Davids .   Cambridge University Press, 1995. Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):  Pages 169 - 193. This text appeared in German in Kaiserin Theophanu: Prinzessin aus der Fremde- des Westreichs Grosse Kaiserin. Edited by G. Wolf. Bohlau, 1991. Pages 263-278.
Year of Publication: 1995.

52. Record Number: 229
Author(s): Campbell, C. Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Courting, Harlotry, and the Art of Gothic Ivory Carving
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 11-19. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

53. Record Number: 2447
Author(s): Ousterhout, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin of the Chora: An Image and Its Contexts [discussion of the mosaic icon of the Virgin in the church of the Chora Monastery in terms of its part in a decorative program that called upon a complex symbolism; also discusses the importance of the Virgin "orans" motif in the related images known as "Blachernitissa," "Episkepsis," and "Platytera"].
Source: The Sacred Image East and West.   Edited by Robert Ousterhout and Leslie Brubaker .   Illinois Byzantine Studies IV. University of Illinois Press, 1995.  Pages 91 - 109.
Year of Publication: 1995.

54. Record Number: 899
Author(s): Cotsonis, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virgin with the "Tongues of Fire" on Byzantine Lead Seals
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 49 (1994): 221-227. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

55. Record Number: 1549
Author(s): Anderson, J. C. and M. J. Jeffreys
Contributor(s):
Title : The Decoration of the Sevastokratorissa's Tent [Greek text, English translation, and commentary on two poems describing Eirene's tent; the authors see parallels in the secular motifs of muses and peacocks with decorations found on ivory boxes].
Source: Byzantion , 64., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 8 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1994.

56. Record Number: 11171
Author(s): Frese, Dolores Warwick.
Contributor(s):
Title : Worda and Worca : "The Battle of Maldon" and the Lost Text of AElfflaed's Tapestry [The author trace similar narrative patterns in "The Battle of Maldon" and the Bayeux Tapestry. Frese suggests that they both may have drawn from AElfflaed's tapestry, described in the "Liber Eliensis," wihich celebrated the deeds of her husband, Byrhtnoth, who was killed at Maldon. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediaevalia , 17., ( 1994):  Pages 27 - 51. (1994 (for 1991))
Year of Publication: 1994.

57. Record Number: 1556
Author(s): Bolduc, Michelle
Contributor(s):
Title : The Disruptive Discourse: Women in the Margins of the "Bayeux Tapestry" and the "Hours of Catherine de Clèves"
Source: Romance Languages Annual , 6., ( 1994):  Pages 18 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1994.

58. Record Number: 8734
Author(s): Kornbluth, Genevra A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Susanna Crystal of Lothar II: Chastity, the Church, and Royal Justice [The author considers the iconography of the Susanna Crystal (which illustrates the Old Testament story) and its relation to contemporary Lotharingian politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 31, 1 (1992): 25-39. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

59. Record Number: 10223
Author(s): Rushing, James A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Iwein as Slave of Woman: the “Maltererteppich” in Freiburg [The story of the Arthurian knight Iwein was known to medieval audiences not only through literary texts but also through pictorial representations, such as an early fourteenth-century tapestry in the Augustinermuseum in Freiburg. This wall-hanging features a series of medallions, two of which depict Iwein’s adventures. The other medallions feature examples of “Frauensklaven” or “Minnesklaven” (men humiliated by their submission to women), including some well-known figures like Samson and Delilah and Aristotle and Phyllis. Although the meaning of the tapestry is unclear, the images remove Iwein from his original function as an exemplary figure and insert him into a new context: a pictorial representation of the “Frauensklaven” topos. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 124 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1992.

60. Record Number: 10299
Author(s): Edwards, Nancy and Hulse and Tristan Gray
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fragment of a Reliquary Casket from Gwytherin, North Wales [The authors discuss a recently rediscovered gable end of the shrine of Saint Gwenfrewi (or Winefride). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Antiquaries Journal , 72., ( 1992):  Pages 91 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1992.

61. Record Number: 10269
Author(s): Leja, Meg
Contributor(s):
Title : Mythology, Women and Renaissance Private Life: the Myth of Eurydice in Italian Furniture Painting [The author considers the increasing focus on Eurydice's suffering and death, as well as on her feminine desirability, in Renaissance Italian furniture painting featuring the Orpheus myth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 15., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 127 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1992.

62. Record Number: 10270
Author(s): Olsen, Christina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gross expenditure: Botticelli's Nastagio degli Onesti Panels [The article traces the themes of consumption and extravagance in four Botticellan panels. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 15., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 146 - 170.
Year of Publication: 1992.

63. Record Number: 11046
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Griselda, or the Renaissance Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelor in Tuscan "Cassone Painting" [The author discusses key scenes of Griselda's bridal nudity in Renaissance cassone painting, and argues that these depictions resist simple interpretations either as allegorical icons or reflections of social history. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Stanford Italian Review , 10., 2 ( 1991):  Pages 153 - 175.
Year of Publication: 1991.

64. Record Number: 9541
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : “La Festa di Susanna”: Virtue on Trial in Renaissance Sacred Drama and Painted Wedding Chests [The author examines paintings of Susanna that appear on many fifteenth-century cassoni (wedding chests given to brides upon marriage and also used to transport dowry goods). In fifteenth-century Florence, cassoni paintings and sacred theatrical performances (“sacre rappresentazioni”) engaged in a problematic display of feminine virtue. Domenico di Michelino’s “Susanna and the Elders” panel, originally a cassone painting, depicts scenes from “La Festa di Susanna” (a fifteenth-century “sacra rappresentazione”) along with events from the Biblical narrative. The painting thus invites the viewer to consider not only the example of the Biblical heroine Susanna but also a larger host of contemporary legal, economic, and social issues. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 14., 3 (September 1991):  Pages 329 - 344.
Year of Publication: 1991.

65. Record Number: 12744
Author(s): Balas, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cybele and Her Cult in Andrea Mantegna's "The Triumph of Caesar" [English adaptation of French abstract: The article explains in detail the presence, never before noted, of the pagan goddess Cybele in the series of paintings by Mantegna, "The Triumph of Caesar." Mantegna draws upon Classical and early medieval art and literature in order to present Cybele in different roles: political, military, and religious. The author analyzes Cybele in relation to her cult, suggesting that, during the time of Julius Caesar, she became a national goddess. She was carried along from Gaul by the army for protection, and was brought into Rome in triumph as a spoil of war. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 115., (January 1990):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1990.

66. Record Number: 12752
Author(s): Heslop, T. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Production of De Luxe Manuscripts and the Patronage of King Cnut and Queen Emma [Many lavishly illustrated English Gospel books and devotional manuscripts were produced during the reign of King Cnut and Queen Emma. These luxury items were produced with royal money with the intent that they would be given as presents to powerful individuals in order to help secure allegiance to the crown or they were given (alongside valuable relics or artwork) to institutions like monasteries and churches in order to convey the donors’ piety. Evidence from the handwriting and illumination of Gospel books during the period suggests a large scale production by monastic scribes and artists who worked in close collaboration. Three Appendices. Appendix One lists lavishly illuminated Anglo-Saxon Gospels, 990-1030, with the name of the manuscript, its scribe(s), probable origin, and earliest known medieval ownership. Appendix Two provides excerpts from Latin accounts that give evidence of patronage of art and donation of relics by Cnut and Emma. Appendix Three gives bibliographical information on the Besancon and Copenhagen Gospel books, including information on foliation, ruling, scribes, artists, production sequence, date and origin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):  Pages 151 - 195.
Year of Publication: 1990.

67. Record Number: 12754
Author(s): Lewis, Suzanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Apocalypse of Isabella of France: Paris, Bibl. Nat. MS Fr. 13096. The Appendix outlines the picture cycle and text of the manuscript, listing the text (by chapter and verse number) and subject matter of images on each folio [Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):  Pages 224 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1990.

68. Record Number: 12756
Author(s): Carrasco, Magdalena Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spirituality in Context: The Romanesque Illustrated Life of Saint Radegund of Poitiers (Poitiers, Bibliotheque Municipale, MS 250)
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 414 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1990.

69. Record Number: 12802
Author(s): Enright, Michael J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Goddess Who Weaves: Some Iconographic Aspects of Bracteates of the Fürstenberg Type [The author identifies a possible Nordic weaving goddess on a bracteate, and suggests that further study in this area may allow scholars to perceive continuities between German paganism and the High Middle Ages. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 24., ( 1990):  Pages 54 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1990.

70. Record Number: 12872
Author(s): Williamson, Joan B.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady with the Unicorn and the Mirror [The article discusses the relationship between literature and the Tapestries of the Lady with the Unicorn in the Musée de Cluny, Paris. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinardus: Yearbook of the International Reynard Society , 3., ( 1990):  Pages 213 - 225.
Year of Publication: 1990.

71. Record Number: 12734
Author(s): Barber, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : The imperial panels at San Vitale: a reconsideration [Two sixth century mosaics in the aspe of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy, depict the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (on the left) and his wife Theodora (on the right). Although the Emperor and Empress appear to be represented identically (with purple clothing, haloes, and similar postures), other types of iconography in the panels differentiate the role and status of the figures according to their gender. The Emperor, flanked by priests and soldiers, carries objects that indicate his priestly and military roles. The Empress, dressed in more lavish clothing and jewels and enclosed in a depiction of architectural space, reflects Byzantine society’s legal and social relegation of women (even aristocratic ones) to the domestic sphere. Nonetheless, Theodora’s position in image (in the center with males on one side of her, females, on the other) places her at the boundary between the sexes, as a transgressive figure who straddles both public and private spheres. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 19 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1990.

72. Record Number: 12753
Author(s): Butler, Lawrence and James Graham-Campbell
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lost Reliquary Casket from Gwytherin, North Wales [The Church of Saint Winifrid at Gwytherin in North Wales once possessed a richly decorated casket containing the relics of the martyred virgin Saint Winifred (also known as Gwenfrewi or Winefride) of Wales. A drawing of the casket attributed to Edward Lluyd suggests that Winifred’s reliquary was probably produced in the eight or early ninth century and it was influenced by Anglo-Saxon and Irish decorative styles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Antiquaries Journal , 70., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 40 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1990.

73. Record Number: 11198
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Power of Women Topos on a Fourteenth-Century Embroidery
Source: Viator , 12., ( 1990):  Pages 203 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1990.

74. Record Number: 15595
Author(s): Bedos, Rezak, Brigitte
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Women in French Sigillographic Sources [The author analyzes surviving seals used to authenticate the owners' agreements on charters and other documents. The iconography falls into three categories: 1) Images on women's Seals, 2) Female representations on women's seals, 3) Female representations on other seals. The article was later republished in Form and Order in Medieval France: Studies in Social and Quantitative Sigillography. By Brigitte Bedos-Rezak. Variorum, 1993. Article 10. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Viator , 12., ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1990.

75. Record Number: 12873
Author(s): Ekroll, Øystein and Christopher McLees
Contributor(s):
Title : A Drawing of a Medieval Ivory Chess Piece from the 12th-century Church of St Olav, Trondheim, Norway [The article discusses the discovery of a drawing of a chess piece found in the ruins of St Olav's Church around 1890; the piece itself has been lost. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Archaeology , 34., ( 1990):  Pages 151 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1990.

76. Record Number: 2986
Author(s): Holbert, Kelly.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vindication of a Controversial Early Thirteenth-Century "Vierge Ouvrante" in the Walters Art Gallery
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):  Pages 101 - 121.
Year of Publication: