Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


49 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27576
Author(s): Georgiadou, Sofia,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architectural Projects of Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas (1266/8-1296/8) and Anna Palaiologina in Arta, Epiros
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 83 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2009.

2. Record Number: 24169
Author(s): Franco, Tiziana
Contributor(s):
Title : Sul "muricciolo" nella chiesa di Sant'Andrea di Sommacampagna "per il quale restavan divisi gli uomini dalle donne" [Until late in the 15th century, Italian churches divided clergy from laity and men from women with barriers. Remains of the low wall have been excavated at Sant'Andrea, Sommacampagna, showing that it ran across the width of the nave. The women's section
Source: Hortus Artium Medievalium , 14., ( 2008):  Pages 181 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2008.

3. Record Number: 15840
Author(s): Weddle, Saundra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Identity and Alliance: Urban Presence, Spatial Privilege, and Florentine Renaissance Convents [The author analyses the locations and functions of women's monasteries in late medieval and early modern Florence. Weddle argues that architectural spaces carried multiple meanings. Womens' monasteries were places of spiritual work, but they also could convey meanings related to patronage and politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Hortus Artium Medievalium , 14., ( 2008):  Pages 394 - 412.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 14636
Author(s): Yakou, Hisashi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Contemplating Angels and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" [The author briefly discusses antecedents for the nuns' elevated choir and then turns to the church's frescoes. Yakou in particular focuses on the "Angelic Choirs" and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" in terms both of iconography and meditative use by the Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Hortus Artium Medievalium , 14., ( 2008):  Pages 93 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 14631
Author(s): Genovese, Rosa Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Prologue: History of the Building and Restoration of the Trecento Church [The author briefly surveys Santa Maria Donna Regina's history from its fourteenth century building and alterations in the early modern era to restorations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Hortus Artium Medievalium , 14., ( 2008):  Pages 13 - 26.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 10932
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ekphrasis at Kildare: The Imaginative Architecture of a Seventh Century Hagiographer [The author argues that the hagiographer Cogitosus wrote an extensive descripton of the church at Kildare in his "Vita" of Saint Brigit in order to link the space more closely with her sainted presence. Visitors to Kildare were not only connecting to Brigit, but to the center of Christian history with the church's borrowings from Rome. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 605 - 627.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 11827
Author(s): Manzalaoui, Mahmoud A.
Contributor(s):
Title : English Medieval Nunneries: Buildings, Precincts, and Estates [The author surveys both archaeological and textual monastic buildings and estates. Bond concludes that women's houses, unlike men's monasteries, were not distinctive according to religious order. They tend to be poorer and were usually not able to increase their holdings after the twelfth century. Bond describes all the different kinds of buildings involved including churches, gatehouses, cloisters, refectories, bake houses, and barns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 46 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 10210
Author(s): Talbot, Alice-Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Building Activity in Constantinople under Andronikos II: The Role of Women Patrons in the Construction and Restoration of Monasteries [The author notes the substantial number of both female patrons and women's monasteries during this period. The patrons are connected to the royal family by blood or marriage. Individuals profiled include Theodora Raoulaina, Maria Palaiologina, Theodora Synadene, Irene Choumnaina Palaiologina, and Maria Doukaina Komnene Branaina Palaiologina. The women were all widows at the time of their donations and gave substantial gifts for a monastery to which they could retire and where they could bury their family members. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine Constantinople: Monuments, Topography, and Everyday Life.   Edited by Nevra Necipoglu. The Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies, and Cultures, 400-1453, Volume 33 Medieval Mediterranean, 33.   Brill, 2001. Medieval History Journal , 4., 1 (January-June 2001):  Pages 329 - 343.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 21266
Author(s): Rossi Vairo, Giulia
Contributor(s):
Title : Isabella d'Aragona, "Rainha santa de Portugal," e il monastero di Santa Clara e Santa Isabel di Coimbra (1286-1336) [The monastery of Santa Clara e Santa Isabel was founded by Donna Mor Dias in 1286. Isabel, queen of Portugal, took over patronage of the monastery, refounded it, and completed the buildings. Isabel played a key role in the building project and secured favors for the monastery from the pope. The Queen played an active role in the community's life down to her death, when she was buried in the monastery. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 71., 40180 ( 2001):  Pages 139 - 170.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 6423
Author(s): Jäggi, Carola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eastern Choir or Western Gallery? The Problem of the Place of the Nuns' Choir in Königsfelden and Other Early Mendicant Nunneries
Source: Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 79 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 7040
Author(s): Uffmann, Heike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Inside and Outside the Convent Walls: The Norm and Practice of Enclosure in the Rerformed Nunneries of Late Medieval Germany
Source: Medieval History Journal , 4., 1 (January-June 2001):  Pages 83 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 4635
Author(s): Berman, Constance H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Labours of Hercules," the Cartulary, Church, and Abbey for Nuns of la Cour- Notre- Dame- de- Michery
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 1 (March 2000):  Pages 33 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 6326
Author(s): Weilandt, Gerhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Standortstudien I. Die "Nürnberger Madonna" in der Kirche--Ein neuer Fund zu originalem Aufstellungsort und ikonographischem Kontext
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 62., 4 ( 1999):  Pages 494 - 511.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 3956
Author(s): Holman, Beth L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exemplum and "Imitatio" : Countess Matilda and Lucrezia Pico della Mirandola at Polirone Italy [the Appendix reproduces four documents in Latin concerning Lucrezia Pico della Mirandola and the monastery at Polirone].
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 81,4 (December 1999): 637-664. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

15. Record Number: 4750
Author(s): Connor, Carolyn L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Documents: The Epigram in the Church of Hagios Polyeuktos in Constantinople and Its Byzantine Response [the author argues that Anicia Juliana herself may have composed the seventy-six line epigram that was inscribed inside and outside her magnificent church; later building inscriptions as well as books reacted to her family pride, sumptuous descriptions, and learned rhetoric that was reflected in her influential encomium/dedication; the appendices include a transcription of the Greek epigram that was inscribed in Hagios Polyeuktos; an English translation of the epigram; the Greek epigrams that were inscribed in the church of Saint Euphemia, a church that Juliana refurbished; a transcription of the Greek epigram from the Vienna Dioscurides manuscript (cod. med. gr. 1, fol. 6 verso) which forms an acrostic on Juliana's name; a transcription of the Greek epigram on the frieze of the church of Saints Sergius and Bacchus built by Justin and Theodora shortly after Hagios Polyeuktos].
Source: Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 479 - 527.
Year of Publication: 1999.

16. Record Number: 4336
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women at Church in Byzantium: Where, When- and Why? [The author argues that women were segregated in church and had other limitations to preserve church order, decorum, and offer protection].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 52 (1998): 27-87. Link Info Reprinted in Divine Liturgies - Human Problems in Byzantium, Armenia, Syria and Palestine. By Robert F. Taft. Ashgate Variorum, 2001. Article 1.
Year of Publication: 1998.

17. Record Number: 2896
Author(s): Crossley, Paul.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architecture of Queenship: Royal Saints, Female Dynasties and the Spread of Gothic Architecture in Central Europe [traces the influence of St. Elisabeth's church in Marburg on architecture in central Europe].
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997.  Pages 263 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1997.

18. Record Number: 2330
Author(s): Neuman de Vegvar, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints and Companions to Saints: Anglo-Saxon Royal Women Monastics in Context
Source: Holy Men and Holy Women: Old English Prose Saints' Live and Their Contexts.   Edited by Paul E. Szarmach .   State University of New York Press, 1996. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 51 - 93.
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 6311
Author(s): Magirius, Heinrich.
Contributor(s):
Title : Architektur der Zisterzienserklöster in der Lausitz
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 47., ( 1996):  Pages 263 - 283.
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 2284
Author(s): Shahid, Irfan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Church of Sts. Sergius and Bacchus in Constantinople: Who Built It and Why? [Suggests that both Justinian and his wife Theodora were responsible but had different motives. Theodora was moved by religious concerns while Justinian was worried about the outcome of the Persian War].
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 84
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 473
Author(s): Cooper, Kate
Contributor(s):
Title : A Saint in Exile: The Early Medieval Thecla at Rome and Meriamlik [literary and archaeological evidence of St. Thecla's cult].
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1995.

22. Record Number: 2288
Author(s): Carville, Geraldine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cistercian Nuns in Medieval Ireland: Plary Abbey, Ballymore, County Westmeath
Source: Hidden Springs: Cistercian Monastic Women. Book One. Medieval Religious Women Volume Three.   Edited by John A. Nichols and Lillian Thomas Shank, O.S.C.O Cistercian Studies Series .   Cistercian Publications, 1995. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 62 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 9519
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen Sancia of Mallorca and the Convent Church of Sta. Chiara in Naples [The author argues that the convent church building significantly departs from previous models of architectural planning in the Poor Clare tradition. In part she attributes this to Queen Sancia's deep devotion to the original ideals of Francis which prompted her to found a double house and redesign the church layout so that the nuns could see the host while remaining unseen by the laity and the Friars. The queen also was reacting to ecclesiastical controversies in which her own relatives took leading roles as proponents of the Franciscan Spirituals against Pope John XXII. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 40., ( 1995):  Pages 69 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1995.

24. Record Number: 149
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beauty and the Beast: Ridicule and Orthodoxy in Architectural Marginalia in Early Fourteenth-Century Lincolnshire [sculpted corbels, several of women representing various sins].
Source: Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 37 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 2447
Author(s): Ousterhout, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin of the Chora: An Image and Its Contexts [discussion of the mosaic icon of the Virgin in the church of the Chora Monastery in terms of its part in a decorative program that called upon a complex symbolism; also discusses the importance of the Virgin "orans" motif in the related images known as "Blachernitissa," "Episkepsis," and "Platytera"].
Source: The Sacred Image East and West.   Edited by Robert Ousterhout and Leslie Brubaker .   Illinois Byzantine Studies IV. University of Illinois Press, 1995. Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 91 - 109.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 1685
Author(s): Zomer, Hiltje F. H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The So-Called Women's Gallery in the Medieval Church: An Import from Byzantium [argues that the galleries were a symbol of royal power, not a place for women to be kept separate during services ; the author traces the use of church galleries from Constantine the Great and Justinian to their introduction in Germany at the convent basilica of Gernrode, perhaps under the influence of Theophano, and in France at St. Remi, a victory church for the Capets].
Source: The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Turn of the First Millennium.   Edited by Adelbert Davids .   Cambridge University Press, 1995. Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 169 - 193.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 1532
Author(s): Lozinski, Jean Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Henri II, Aliénor d'Aquitane et la cathédrale de Poitiers
Source: Cahiers de Civilization Médiévale , 37., ( 1994):  Pages 91 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 5100
Author(s): Barrière, Bernadette.
Contributor(s):
Title : Coyroux, Doublet féminin de l'Abbaye d'Obazine (Limousin, XIIe-XIIIe siècles) [The author, using textual and archaeological evidence, considers the dependence of the female house at Coyroux on the nearby male house ; Coyroux needed financial support, spiritual care, and even contact with the outside world through Obazine.]
Source: Les Religieuses dans le Cloître et dans le Monde des Origines à Nos Jours. Actes du Deuxième Colloque International de C.E.R.C.O.R. Poitiers, 29 septembre-2 octobre 1988. .   Publications de l'Université de Sainte-Etienne, 1994. Cahiers de Civilization Médiévale , 37., ( 1994):  Pages 131 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 8479
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Bodies in the Material World: Gender, Stigma, and the Body [ The author addresses two issues, one of which concerns the defining of the gendered female body through high status architecture. The author compares the spaces for women in castles with female monasteries. She finds segregation and enclosure in both with physical boundaries to control access. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 40., ( 1995):  Pages 43 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1994.

30. Record Number: 10224
Author(s): Cassidy, Brendan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Orcagna’s Tabernacle in Florence: Design and Function [In the mid-fourteenth century, Andrea Orcagna was commissioned to design a new shrine to house an image of the Madonna in the Church of Orsanmichele in Florence. The author describes the original appearance of the shrine and the devotional purposes it served, as well as the shrine’s relationship to an earlier tabernacle that stood in Orsanmichele. The shrine provided a focus for devotion to the Virgin, and although it was not originally designed for celebration of the Mass, it was at some point converted to include an altar for that purpose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 180 - 211.
Year of Publication: 1992.

31. Record Number: 10225
Author(s): King, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-style [Women were able to commission art and architecture in fourteenth and fifteenth century Italy in a variety of ways, even if their involvement in the production of images and construction of buildings wasn’t as widespread as men’s. For instance, wealthy widows could control the making of large, public images such as funerary altarpieces, while nuns could commission artwork and buildings through convent endowments. Through their acts of patronage, these “matrons” challenged conventional expectations that women inhabit a small, private sphere. The author also analyzes how women chose to represent themselves visually within the works they commissioned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 372 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1992.

32. Record Number: 10295
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hearing is Believing: Clarissan Architecture, ca. 1213-1340 [The article studies convent churches in medieval Italy, in order to evaluate changes in the liturgical participation of Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 83-91. Link Info Later published in Medieval Religion: New Approaches. Edited by Constance Hoffman Berman. Routledge, 2005. Pages 272-289.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 10298
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Art, Enclosure and the "Cura Monialium": Prolegomena in the Guise of a Postscript [The author addresses the question of female spirituality in the Middle Ages by looking both at monastic architecture and female patronage within the visual arts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 108-134. Link InfoReprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 35-109.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10297
Author(s): Simmons, Loraine N.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Abbey Church at Fontevraud in the Later Twelfth Century: Anxiety, Authority and Architecture in the Female Spiritual Life [The article considers how Abbey of Fontevraud implemented spatial expressions of "proximity anxiety" prompted by the special needs of a dual-gender community. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 99-107. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 8690
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed Art Thou Among Women: the Archaeology of Female Piety [The author discusses the orientation, archaeological, and iconographic details of medieval British cloisters and other women’s monastic buildings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman is a Worthy Wight: Women in English Society c. 1200-1500.   Edited by P.J.P. Goldberg .   Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992.  Pages 212 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 10294
Author(s): Barriere, Bernadette.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cistercian Convent of Coyroux in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries [The article considers the implications of the harsh living conditions at the Coyroux Cistercian convent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 76-82. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

37. Record Number: 11069
Author(s): Camille, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gothic Signs and the Surplus: The Kiss on the Cathedral [The kiss was a sign with many meanings, and its symbolic significance in medieval visual and verbal representations is manifold. A sculpture on the West Front of Amiens Cathedral depicts the sin of lechery through the image of a man and woman kissing, yet the kiss did not always stand in for representations of sexual intercourse (legitimate or illicit). The kiss could have spiritual and allegorical significance (e.g., visual representations of the Song of Songs), legal force (e.g., feudal and courtly rituals), treacherous or transgressive overtones (e.g., representations of Judas and Christ or other same-sex couples kissing), mystical meanings, or devotional purposes (e.g., the kiss of peace). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 151-170. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

38. Record Number: 12755
Author(s): Leveto, Paula D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Marian Theme of the Frescoes in Santa Maria at Castelseprio
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 391 - 413.
Year of Publication: 1990.

39. Record Number: 12692
Author(s): Kaske, R. E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amnon and Thamar on a Misericord in a Hereford Cathedral [Although the majority of misericords appear to depict secular scenes, one misericord in the Hereford Cathedral may in fact depict a Biblical scene: the episode of Amnon and Thamar (here, Amnon makes advances toward his half-sister Thamar just before he rapes her). Rather than being too unsuitable or obscure for an appearance on a misericord, this episode of rape and incest was well known and often moralized by medieval commentators. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1990.

40. Record Number: 12734
Author(s): Barber, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : The imperial panels at San Vitale: a reconsideration [Two sixth century mosaics in the aspe of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy, depict the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (on the left) and his wife Theodora (on the right). Although the Emperor and Empress appear to be represented identically (with purple clothing, haloes, and similar postures), other types of iconography in the panels differentiate the role and status of the figures according to their gender. The Emperor, flanked by priests and soldiers, carries objects that indicate his priestly and military roles. The Empress, dressed in more lavish clothing and jewels and enclosed in a depiction of architectural space, reflects Byzantine society’s legal and social relegation of women (even aristocratic ones) to the domestic sphere. Nonetheless, Theodora’s position in image (in the center with males on one side of her, females, on the other) places her at the boundary between the sexes, as a transgressive figure who straddles both public and private spheres. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 19 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1990.

41. Record Number: 30921
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Obsequies of St. Fina
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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42. Record Number: 30939
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Expulsion from Eden; Eve Tilling the Earth
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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43. Record Number: 30950
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pilgrims at the Tomb of St. Nicholas of Bari
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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44. Record Number:
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Title : Lactation of St. Bernard
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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45. Record Number:
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Title : St. Bernadino Preaching in the Campo
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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46. Record Number:
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Title : Hildesheim Doors
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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47. Record Number: 31174
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Panel from the Humility Polyptych - Umilta helps to build the church and monastery of San Giovanni Evangelista
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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48. Record Number: 31389
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Stucco reliefs of holy women
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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49. Record Number: 32405
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Kilpeck Sheela-na-Gig
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
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