Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


6 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 11407
Author(s): Lifshitz, Felice.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Persistence of Late Antiquity: Christ as Man and Woman in an Eighth-Century Miniature [The author discusses a miniature in which she argues that Christ is portrayed twice, once as the crucified Jesus and beneath as a female blessing figure. Lifshitz connects this to an intellectual milieu in which aristocratic women in monastic double houses were used to having spiritual authority. Furthermore they had access to late antique sources with similar outlooks including the Priscillianist tractates and the "Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles." Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 18 - 27.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 4762
Author(s): Snipes-Hoyt, Carolyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jeanne d'Arc Visits Paris in 1912: "Dramatis personae" and Personification [the author argues that the novelist Comtesse d'Houdetot embodies the values of a hierarchical system in her novel about Joan of Arc; at the same time she suggests in the subtext that women can move beyond the limits imposed by turn-of-the-century bourgeois society].
Source: French Review , 73., 6 (May 2000):  Pages 1141 - 1154.
Year of Publication: 2000.

3. Record Number: 1751
Author(s): Edwards, Lilas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Joan of Arc: Empowerment and Risk in Androgyny
Source: Medieval Life , 5., (Summer 1996):  Pages 3 - 6.
Year of Publication: 1996.

4. Record Number: 878
Author(s): Morey, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beowulf's Androgynous Heroism [in crossing tribal lines, Beowulf assumes the feminine role of peace weaver].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 95., 4 (Oct. 1996):  Pages 486 - 496.
Year of Publication: 1996.

5. Record Number: 1127
Author(s): Corless, Roger.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Androgynous Mysticism of Julian of Norwich [Julian mostly avoids erotic heterosexual imagery in favor of a God that acts both as father and mother].
Source: Magistra , 1., 1 (Summer 1995):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1995.

6. Record Number: 12729
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donatello's Bronze 'David': Grillanda, Goliath, Groom? [Art historians have explored many perspectives on Donatello's youthful and androgynous representation of the nude David including psychoanalytic and homoerotic perspectives, but these male centered approaches overlook the possibility of a female audience for the statue. Paintings on contemporary Florentine cassoni (wedding chests), including scenes from the life of David (like his battle with Goliath or his subsequent wedding to a royal bride) or seemingly unrelated depictions of scantily clad males (often painted underneath the lids), establish the possibility of a wedding context for Donatello's sensuous nude. In the context of nuptial imagery, this representation of David might appeal to a prospective bride as well as the narcissistic or homoerotic desire of an imagined male audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1993.