Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


19 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 19218
Author(s): Shepard, Laurie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marking Time: The Lives of the Young in Fifteenth-century Tuscany [In this short, introductory essay for an art exhibit, the author reviews religious and secular beliefs about infancy, childhood and adolescence. Gender distinctions affected girls' education, marriage, and spousal duties. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Secular Sacred: 11th-16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.   Edited by Nancy Netzer .   McMullen Museum of Art, 2006.  Pages 74 - 79.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 14092
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Desiring Virgins: Maidens, Martyrs, and Femininity in Late Medieval England [The author explores the attractions of virgin martyr stories for young women in the audience. Phillips suggests that the treatment of sexual themes in these stories should be described as "parasexual" (borrowed from studies of Victorian bar maids), cases in which sexuality is acknowledged but is controlled. At the same time the young virgin martyrs are presented as beautiful, glamorous, and dressed in fashionable clothing; all of this was of prime interest to the young women in the audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Youth in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. J. P. Goldberg and Felicity Riddy .   York Medieval Press in association with the Boydell Press, 2004.  Pages 45 - 59.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 14093
Author(s): Goldberg, P. J. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Migration, Youth, and Gender in Later Medieval England [The author looks at English records from church courts and from taxation. He concludes that most migrants were young and travelled relatively short distances. In addition, women were more likely to move away from home than men. Goldberg adds that, while migration was a lifecycle phase for many young people, some individuals because of poverty were obligated to remain migrant servants or laborers all their lives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Youth in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. J. P. Goldberg and Felicity Riddy .   York Medieval Press in association with the Boydell Press, 2004.  Pages 85 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 6217
Author(s): Hennessey, Cecily.
Contributor(s):
Title : Visibility/Invisibility: Young Male Byzantine Saints
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 8806
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Aristocratic Teenaged Female: Adolescent or Adult? [The author argues that there was a more "fluid scale of ages" for women than for men, particularly involving royalty and the nobility. Young women could act decisively and authoritatively when helping their husbands or protecting their children. Parsons points to the case of Isabelle of Hainaut who at fourteen performed a dramatic public prayer to win public support and prevent her husband's planned divorce. Elizabeth Plantagenet, Countess of Holland, at fiften years enlisted the help of the Hague's burgers to rescue her young husband who had been kidnapped by the regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 311 - 321.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 8804
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval Adolescent [The author provides a brief overview of ideas about sexuality and about the sexual behaviors of adolescents. The author concentrates on four groups in the late Middle Ages: monks, male and female royalty and nobles, university students (all young men), and female and male apprentices. Stoertz concludes that young women did not enjoy the freedom that most young men (excluding monks) had in sexual matters, though it was commonly acknowledged that all young people were lustful and full of passion. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 225 - 243.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 8802
Author(s): Sebregondi, Ludovica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothes and Teenagers: What Young Men Wore in Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author argues that young Florentine men wore distinctive clothing. Tight-fitting and revealing cothing that emphasized the wearer's masculinity were popular. Moralists complained but did not succeed in changing fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 27 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 8805
Author(s): Lansing, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Girls in Trouble in Late Medieval Bologna [The author draws evidence of teenaged girls from thirteenth century legal testimony. These cases involved concubines, kidnappings, pregnancies, and neglected girls without marriage prospects. Though the court tended to view these girls as victims, some evidence suggests they were frequently independent and even rebellious. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 293 - 309.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 8803
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Knights under the Feminine Gaze ["The women served a ratifying function for a youth's entry into a masculine hierarchy of knightly prestige, but they did not themselves choose the criteria by which they evaluated men. A woman's gaze at a young knight was not a sign of her activity as opposed to his passivity, but rather the sign that she was the prize he was to win, the currency in which his worth in other men's eyes was to be measured." Page 203.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 189 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 5998
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Women in France and England, 1050- 1300
Source: Journal of Women's History (Full Text via Project Muse) 12, 4 (Winter 2001): 22-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 3745
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Military Masculinity in England and Northern France c.1050 - c.1225 [the ideal aristocratic warrior was physically and morally complete, adept at war, and loyal, but above all he had deep friendships with his warrior companions].
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999.  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 1999.

12. Record Number: 4022
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maidenhood as the Perfect Age of Woman's Life [The author explores the idea of what was the ideal age for women, drawing evidence from the "Pearl," stories of the virgin martyrs, and representations of the Virgin Mary during the Assumption and the Coronation].
Source: Young Medieval Women.   Edited by Katherine J. Lewis, Noel James Menuge, and Kim M. Phillips .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1999.

13. Record Number: 2508
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Relationships Between Parents and their Absent Adolescent Offspring in the High Middle Ages [briefly considers contact between parents and children who were away because of marriage, apprenticeship, education at universities, or entrance into a monastery].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 38 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1997.

14. Record Number: 707
Author(s): Christelow, Stephanie Mooers.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Division of Inheritance and the Provision of Non- Inheriting Offspring Among the Anglo- Norman Elite [study of some fifty families over three generations with an emphasis on the careers of younger children through marriage, the Church, and royal service].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 17., 2 (Autumn 1996):  Pages 3 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1996.

15. Record Number: 1753
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Beauty Myth: An Aesthetics of Virginity [discusses the qualities that were most valued: slenderness, youth, virginity, and a meek and passive posture with a pulled-in chin and chest and a thrust-forward belly].
Source: Medieval Life , 5., (Summer 1996):  Pages 10 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1996.

16. Record Number: 324
Author(s): Nicholas, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Child and Adolescent Labour in the Late Medieval City: A Flemish Model in Regional Perspective
Source: English Historical Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 110 (Nov. 1995): 1103-1131. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

17. Record Number: 1084
Author(s): Ní Dhonnchadha, Máirín
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Lex Innocentium": Adomnán's Law for Women, Clerics, and Youths, 697 A. D [Adomnán attempted to shield women, youth, and clerics from warfare and levied heavy penalties against those who injured or killed women].
Source: Chattel, Servant, or Citizen: Women's Status in Church, State, and Society.   Edited by Mary O' Dowd and Sabine Wichert .   Historical Studies 19. Papers Read Before the XXIst Irish Conference of Historians, Held at Queen's University of Belfast, 27-30 May 1993. Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen's University of Belfast, 1995.  Pages 58 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1995.

18. Record Number: 10281
Author(s): Chojnacki, Stanley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Measuring Adulthood: Adolescence and Gender in Renaissance Venice [The article studies the different ways adolescence and adulthood were defined for men and women in renaissance Venice, and argues that graduated adulthood offered both sexes the possibility of varied adult identities. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Family History , 17., 4 ( 1992):  Pages 371 - 395. Republished in slightly altered form as Measuring Adulthood: Adolescence and Gender. By Stanley Chojnacki. Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. Pages 185-205.
Year of Publication: 1992.

19. Record Number: 10280
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Historical Descriptions and Prescriptions for Adolescence [The author considers the concept of adolescence, with a focus on female adolescence, as it was recognized and defined from the Middle Ages to the present. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Family History , 17., 4 ( 1992):  Pages 341 - 351.
Year of Publication: 1992.